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Thread: Money burning a hole in my pocket - new router table?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Northern Arizona
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    682

    Money burning a hole in my pocket - new router table?

    I was thinking of replacing my Jet JWS-22CS shaper with a SawStop cast iron router table attached to my SawStop ICS. Although there will be no savings in floor space the working surface for the table saw and router would be greater. I think dust collection would be better too for router functions. Are there any other advantages? Any disadvantages besides the extra expense?

  2. #2
    What's the length of your fence? I've got a similar setup in my Grizzly G1023, which has a standard short fence. I find that the fence I built for the router table takes up a good amount of space, reducing usable space of the table saw. It's not too bad, but I do find it annoying to shift things back and forth depending on whether I'm using the router table, or the table saw.

    I'm thinking about upgrading to a SawStop in the future with a 52" fence to avoid this issue.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
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    4,273
    Should work fine, as long as you don't need the shaper.

    I have a RT built into my TS, but don't use it too often for the reasons Andrew mentions.

    Is it possible to go the other way, and add a RT setup to the back side of your shaper? Both worlds etc.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Landenberg, Pa
    Posts
    172
    Depending on your saw, you may need new rails for the router table extension, which may add to the expense and trouble of the setup. Just a thought.

    Whether the SS extension, or a standalone RT (whatever brand you like), the appropriate dust bucket beneath is going to achieve the dust collection you seek in any case.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    I was thinking of replacing my Jet JWS-22CS shaper with a SawStop cast iron router table attached to my SawStop ICS. Although there will be no savings in floor space the working surface for the table saw and router would be greater. I think dust collection would be better too for router functions. Are there any other advantages? Any disadvantages besides the extra expense?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
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    1,164
    I made a router table fence that just slips over top of the TS fence. It only takes seconds to put on or take off. Works well for me.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    285
    I'm kind of going in the opposite direction.

    I have a standalone Woodpeckers Router table, which I replaced the stand with a home made cabinet to utilize the space beneath and provide better dust collection.

    I also added a router table to my Sawstop and went with the Incra LS Positioner fence, which can be lifted off and rotated 180 degrees and becomes the router sub fence. I can then attach the Incra Wonder fence and now have great dust collection plus fantastic repeatability in setup.

    I have the Jessem Master Lift 2 in my router table in the Sawstop. I actually prefer this to the Woodpeckers PRL2, which wore out the gears and had to be returned for service. Woodpeckers' were great about this, but I was out shipping, one way, and about 3 weeks for repair.

    I'm waiting the delivery of a Hammer Shaper, been putting it off for a few months, while my garage is currently converted to a temporary spray booth.

    Prior to having the Woodpeckers or the router in my Sawstop, I had made a router table with a large top and really appreciated the large working area, even with featherboards and other hold downs, having the extra width on the indeed and outfield, to support the work, just felt better.

    This is my WoodPeckers, shown with my homemade cabinet and with the original Woodpeckers stand




    On my Sawstop, I decided to go with the Incra router table insert with the Jesse lift. This allowed me to make a dust collection box, out of a 12" melamine shelf, and easily attach it to the underside of the router table. It also provided me with storage space for the Incra router wonder fence when not in use.

    Incra fence in saw position, sits over the router lift.



    Router dust box with door removed.


    Router dust box with door in place, held on by magnets



    Storage for Incra wonder fence on router dust box



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    6,340
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    I was thinking of replacing my Jet JWS-22CS shaper with a SawStop cast iron router table attached to my SawStop ICS. Although there will be no savings in floor space the working surface for the table saw and router would be greater. I think dust collection would be better too for router functions. Are there any other advantages? Any disadvantages besides the extra expense?
    Steve
    Other than the ability to use a smaller diameter cutters/bits, albeit less expensive, or make joints with the correct fences and jigs, I personally do not see any advantage to a table mounted router, when compared to a shaper.
    I realize that your shaper is not a big one, at 1-1/2HP, but it is still more robust in build than the largest router you can mount in a table. I would analyze what your shaper is not doing for you, and correct that. If dust collection is the central issue, correct that with the shaper you have.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 07-04-2019 at 11:43 AM.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    9,441
    I canít imagine going from a shaper to a router table.

    The power, capacity, accuracy and versatility of a shaper makes any router table pale in comparison.

    Yes shapers take up space, thatís why I have a saw/shaper combo.

    Tiliting spindle, sliding table, 4 speeds, reverse rotation, stock feeder, the ability to make tenons in one pass, climb cut, use an outboard fence are a few of the things that make a shaper the most versatile machine in my shop.....Regards, Rod.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    959
    I feel the same as Rod. I used to have a router table and then I purchased my first shaper,it was a Steel City 3 h.p. with forward/reverse and two speeds. It came with a 3/4'' and 1'' spindles and a router bit collet. We used the router bits I already had at first . I now have quite a few shaper cutters for it and use them most of the time. The router collet still gets used occasionally. I have since bought a second shaper that is bigger and came with a pile of tooling. I doubt I will ever have another router table.

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