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Thread: Soundproofing for workshop entry wall

  1. #16
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    Apr 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I was told that a wall made of lead bricks is quieter insider the cave area. Wonder what effect sheet lead inside walls ,like at a dentist office, would have. I do not notice it at my dentists.
    Bill D
    Lead works very well, but is rarely used anymore. There are just easier, cheaper ways to add mass to an assembly. And no one wants lead in their house.

    Unless your dentist clinic is more than 30 or 40 years old, it will not have lead in the walls. X-ray exposure is currently a tiny fraction of what it was back in the day. The last time we did a CT scanner room about 15 years ago, it had lead in the walls though (much more intense radiation in there)

  2. #17
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    I would look at adding MLV (suspended if possible) or likely the double drywall works as well - mass is good. Other good advice/experiences here, chase any openings, 'windows' essentially anything that can conduct vibration from one side to the other. I have only done automobiles albeit with a LOT of reading/research on the subject. Yes a lot of conflicting information because few/limited direct scientific comparisons out there and every space is different (the details matter!). And dont forget noise can transmit to the outside and then back in to the house - you have to do the entire shop to control that! (or put key culprits like dust collectors in their own isolation room)

    My experience has been that each step along the way makes a 'little' difference. And then my ears quickly adapt and the next most annoying sound is obvious. So it can become a little obsessive to chase... But in the end, all the efforts added up to something that makes a big difference (although it is hard to get before/after data without sophisticated equipment, and even then you have to interpret because some sounds (types, frequencies) are more tolerable to humans than others)

    Also consider the SOURCE of noise. For example, not all equipment makes the same sound. Using a shaper is much less annoying sound wise than a router table for example. Planer blades (straight vs spiral) make a difference. Certain table saw blades seem louder than others (or a different pitch). Dust collectors are not all the same noise levels. And of course, the more you do with hand tools the lower the noise level...

    Am chuckling, because for as much passion as exists around dust collection, festool, and sawstops here the entire topic of sound deadening could top them all... just there arent that many shops that tackle it. Definitely let us know what you do and how it works out!!

  3. #18
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    I'm stuck with the large double doors. I'll get insulated outside doors, and weatherstrip, but that certainly won't be perfect.What will help, somewhat, for the upstairs of the house is the 17 foot ceilings with solid cement block construction and tin metal covering. I'm worried more about noise travelling to my neighbor next door.
    If you drive at the speed of light, do your headlights work? - Steven Wright

    If a man points at the moon, an idiot will look at the finger.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    I'm stuck with the large double doors. I'll get insulated outside doors, and weatherstrip, but that certainly won't be perfect.What will help, somewhat, for the upstairs of the house is the 17 foot ceilings with solid cement block construction and tin metal covering. I'm worried more about noise travelling to my neighbor next door.
    For my room I used back to back exterior insulated steel doors. By themselves they weren't great, so I secured 3/4" MDF/GreenGlue to each door and added a second set of weather stripping to each. Made a tremendous improvement.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    Lead works very well, but is rarely used anymore. There are just easier, cheaper ways to add mass to an assembly. And no one wants lead in their house.

    Unless your dentist clinic is more than 30 or 40 years old, it will not have lead in the walls. X-ray exposure is currently a tiny fraction of what it was back in the day. The last time we did a CT scanner room about 15 years ago, it had lead in the walls though (much more intense radiation in there)
    We also had battleship armor that had been acquired with the thought of using it for shielding. This was new surplus material from cancelled battleship construction. It was flat from the rolling mill, not yet curved into final shape. But it was not flat enough to stack and have tight gaps that particles could not leak through. They ended up using it as retaining walls. I think it was about 12x24 inches and 20-30 feet long. Must have cost a fortune to custom make. I was told no scrap yard was interested in it since it was too big to melt down. It would cost more to cut into small enough chunks then the scrap would sell for.
    Bil lD
    W

  6. #21
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    How do the double sheet rock sheets attach to each other when using Green Glue? Are they screwed together, or does the glue hold them in place (seems iffy at best).
    If you drive at the speed of light, do your headlights work? - Steven Wright

    If a man points at the moon, an idiot will look at the finger.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    We also had battleship armor that had been acquired with the thought of using it for shielding. This was new surplus material from cancelled battleship construction. It was flat from the rolling mill, not yet curved into final shape. But it was not flat enough to stack and have tight gaps that particles could not leak through. They ended up using it as retaining walls. I think it was about 12x24 inches and 20-30 feet long. Must have cost a fortune to custom make. I was told no scrap yard was interested in it since it was too big to melt down. It would cost more to cut into small enough chunks then the scrap would sell for.
    Bil lD
    W
    Wow! How much would one of those pieces weigh?

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    How do the double sheet rock sheets attach to each other when using Green Glue? Are they screwed together, or does the glue hold them in place (seems iffy at best).
    GreenGlue isn't even actually glue, it's just really, really sticky. But it doesn't harden & has no holding power. It's just applied to the surface & then the next sheet screwed on.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    Wow! How much would one of those pieces weigh?
    Enough that if it was thrown in the melting pot the pot would break and molten iron would pour out on the floor.
    Bill D

    about 1200 pounds per cubic foot.

  10. #25
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    Apr 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    Quietrock is super expensive. Better to just go with more layers of fire rated 5/8" with GG between them.
    Rats...
    “Learn what you can control and what you cannot..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

  11. #26
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    Mar 2016
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    My attached garage in Florida is insulated similarly to our house but actually better as the walls have spray foam in them and I run a separate mini split for heat/cool. The wall between the house and garage has a layer of OSB on the studs, followed by two 5/8” layers of drywall. Builder said they did this as a fire wall since garage was attached but the side benefit is that you can’t really hear the shop noise in the house.

  12. #27
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    So here is what I chose. It will be a couple of months until it's installed, but hopefully it will work well. I'll definitely report back when it's finished.

    It will be a 2x6 stud wall with double 5/8" drywall with green glue between them on one side, R30 Quiet Batt insulation inside for thermal and some sound insulation, and 5/8" drywall on the shop side.

    Hopefully this will help a lot. Time will tell. Certainly not cheap.
    If you drive at the speed of light, do your headlights work? - Steven Wright

    If a man points at the moon, an idiot will look at the finger.

  13. #28
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    If you do 2 x 6 wall, then do a double row of staggered studs. It will make a huge difference over solid 6" studs.

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