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Thread: Exasperated with Fine Woodworking Magazine!

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    500
    It would appear the train is coming off the tracks and there is no engineer in the locomotive.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Manning View Post
    It would appear the train is coming off the tracks and there is no engineer in the locomotive.
    This is something often seen in organizations where there are different departments trying to do the same thing. The policy decision do not flow to the workers on the front line. They are told one thing and the management above has a different policy and the different departments have their own way of doing things.

    It sounds like a mess.

    After all my subscriptions expired my choice has to spend a little time at the magazine rack to see if there is anything of interest to me.

    Sadly, the items of interest are becoming as rare as the magazine racks that used to be in almost every grocery, hardware and drug store.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    Ben, I was specifically told by customer service that there was no online only option.
    Let me look into that, because I was told there was going to be. Please shoot me an email when you can. bstrano@taunton.com

  4. #49
    The same thing happened to me (credit card expired, I had appeared to lose my access to the grandfathered rate). Customer support fixed me right up (I don't recall if I phoned or emailed). I was actually fairly impressed that the system worked well and fairly (I was expecting to be told this was my fault for having not updated the credit card and was SOL). So - kudos to FWW customer support from me. (I'm definitely a nobody with no from-high interventions).

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SE KY
    Posts
    317
    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Strano View Post
    J. Greg,

    If you like, shoot me an email and we'll get you set back up. bstrano@taunton.com
    Thanks to Ben and the excellent support staff at Fine Woodworking Iím back up and running with my old subscription. The process went much more smoothly than what I would have expected and Iím appreciative of that. Thanks again Ben!

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    6,437
    I am not pleased with any of the current woodworking magazines.
    I think they have run out of new innovative ideas and techniques, both technical and design.
    I do buy and read them though.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    6,437
    I must recant this post. I forgot that I had mailed in a subscription to Fine Woodworking. The first issue came today, and it is fresh with good ideas. I will keep it on the coffee table for awhile.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    6,437
    Ben,
    I received my first issue today and it is an interesting issue. It will stay on my coffee table for awhile.
    I recant my earlier post.

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broadview Heights, OH
    Posts
    609
    A personal favorite was the article on Belt Sander Basics. Because nothing screams Fine Woodworking more than the subtleties of operating the belt sander.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Longview WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Taran View Post
    A personal favorite was the article on Belt Sander Basics. Because nothing screams Fine Woodworking more than the subtleties of operating the belt sander.
    LOL!

    The sander screams... and screams and screams.

    Since learning better plane techniques and sharpening my use of sandpaper has dropped considerably.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,435
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Taran View Post
    A personal favorite was the article on Belt Sander Basics. Because nothing screams Fine Woodworking more than the subtleties of operating the belt sander.
    Why not? Very useful tool for roughing work. Or were they discussing finishing applications?

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    459
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Taran View Post
    A personal favorite was the article on Belt Sander Basics. Because nothing screams Fine Woodworking more than the subtleties of operating the belt sander.
    Who among us has never experimented with a belt sander when we didn't have access to the tools that would do the best job possible. If you're careful and conservative on how you use it, a belt sander can work as a starting point. The finishing can come after flattening a board or leveling out a glue joint.

    While you and I may have all the tools necessary to avoid using a belt sander,, many beginning woodworkers don't.

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
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    1,164
    I wouldn't look down my nose at a belt sander any more than I would a Black & Decker Workmate. Both are very useful, if not high brow, tools.

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broadview Heights, OH
    Posts
    609
    Randy,

    I've never experimented with a belt sander and don't own one. I can't think of any practical use for one frankly. Just stating that articles on belt sanders are not why most folks subscribe to FWW. I think FWW is adrift. Coming next month: Router Shoot Out and Review! YMMV.


    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Heinemann View Post
    Who among us has never experimented with a belt sander when we didn't have access to the tools that would do the best job possible. If you're careful and conservative on how you use it, a belt sander can work as a starting point. The finishing can come after flattening a board or leveling out a glue joint.

    While you and I may have all the tools necessary to avoid using a belt sander,, many beginning woodworkers don't.

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    7,693
    have a "Dragster" B&D beltsander right now, and USE it.

    For those big curves that the sabre saw cuts..
    Computer Desk Hutch, round corners.JPG
    To remove those saw marks, and "fair" the curve a bit better.
    Or, put an old 100 grit belt on, well worn....clamp the top handle in the vise, and clamp a chisel or plane iron in the honing guide. Lock the sander "On", and remove the hollow grind into a flat grind, AND flatten the backs.

    If the "scream" bothers you....wear the ear protection you wear in the shop, anyway.

    Nothing cleans up dirty, rough sawn lumber better than a beltsander with some 60 grit belts....beats using my planes, and save the plane irons' edges.

    When you can't take the outside jobs to the shop's bench,,,,and Work Mate (type 2) takes the bench to the job. used mine during the front porch project, in fact...
    They all have their place...

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