Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Chisel Tills

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    White Lake, Michigan
    Posts
    42

    Chisel Tills

    Of my own design, rendered in cherry. Dovetails, dadoes, and the back panel joinery done using hand-tools only. It was a particular pleasure to use my new Veritas combination plane to produce the tongues, the grooves, and the beads on each of the slats in the back panel. Finished in polyurethane.

    Thanks for looking.

    IMG_0708.jpgIMG_0709.jpgIMG_0710.jpgIMG_0711.jpgIMG_0712.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    6,449
    David, I like that. In fact, that is what I would do if I had the space. There are large tool cabinets on the wall above my lathe, and when I upgraded from a Jet mini plus bed extension several months ago, I went looking for a way to add bowl chisels to spindle chisels.

    My “solution” to storage of lathe chisels works OK, but it is not my first choice.









    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    White Lake, Michigan
    Posts
    42
    Derek...

    I acquired the lathe and the tools from a local fellow who priced them to sell, and I snatched them up forthwith. I am blessed with a large shop space and had the room to mount the tills on the wall. I also purchased a Oneway Wolverine system with a 60 grit CBN wheel to maintain the turning chisels (I already owned a 180 grit CBN wheel to put bevels on my edge tools), and I am now poised learn turning on what I hope to me my starter lathe.

    The real star of the show in this project was the Veritas combination plane, which I find to be a truly elegant tool, and one that is a true pleasure to use.

    Thanks for the kind remarks....

    - David

  4. #4
    Looks great! Cherry is a favorite of mine and I like the clean lines. Glad to hear you enjoyed the combo plane- I’m looking forward to getting mine back out after I finish drywalling and painting in my shop.

    Best
    Chris

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    6,449
    Quote Originally Posted by Joel David Katz View Post
    Derek...

    I acquired the lathe and the tools from a local fellow who priced them to sell, and I snatched them up forthwith. I am blessed with a large shop space and had the room to mount the tills on the wall. I also purchased a Oneway Wolverine system with a 60 grit CBN wheel to maintain the turning chisels (I already owned a 180 grit CBN wheel to put bevels on my edge tools), and I am now poised learn turning on what I hope to me my starter lathe.

    The real star of the show in this project was the Veritas combination plane, which I find to be a truly elegant tool, and one that is a true pleasure to use.

    Thanks for the kind remarks....

    - David
    David, I meant to state that the reason for posting mine was to make yours look even better! I had exactly the same Jet lathe as yours for 10 years. It is a truly excellent lathe for small parts, and I also used to make chair and table legs on it as well ... just work slowly (due to its lower power).

    Incidentally, did you mean a 600 grit CBN wheel? You wrote "60 grit", and I cannot imagine its use for lathe chisels.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Last edited by Derek Cohen; 06-28-2019 at 6:28 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N Illinois
    Posts
    4,423
    Joel, very nice plan and results!!! Good job!
    Jerry

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    White Lake, Michigan
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    David, I meant to state that the reason for posting mine was to make yours look even better! I had exactly the same Jet lathe as yours for 10 years. It is a truly excellent lathe for small parts, and I also used to make chair and table legs on it as well ... just work slowly (due to its lower power).

    Incidentally, did you mean a 600 grit CBN wheel? You wrote "60 grit", and I cannot imagine its use for lathe chisels.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    I took your post as a great compliment. I admire your work and expertise and I appreciate the kind words.

    There was no typo. I bought a 60 grit for a specific purpose, i.e., the chisels needed a lot of material removed to bring them into working order, and the 60 grit is the tool for the job. In addition, I regularly refurbish old tools and a 60 grit wheel provides a no-nonsense method of putting new bevels on edge tools that have been neglected and/or abused over many decades. Lastly, there are not a few fellows out there who prefer sharpening their roughing gouges, spindle gouges, and skew chisels on a 60 grit wheel because it minimizes the time you're away from the lathe. In any case, I also have a 180 grit CBN wheel mounted on the same grinder. If you're right (and you may very well be right) that it's overkill I have the 180 to fall back on when sharpening those turning tools.

    - David

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •