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Thread: Bridge City Tools

  1. #46
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    Sep 2007
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    Longview WA
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    As double iron planes, my Clifton’s have a chip breaker that is engineering perfection, right where it counts. Yes the blade is a bit thicker and the plane heavy.
    Some thoughts on thicker plane irons:

    When irons are thicker than ~1/8" they can be a pain to sharpen for us members of the flat bevel society.

    Being thicker adds weight to the iron. Extra weight requires more energy to set up resonance in the blade. Resonance is one aspect of chatter. Part of the idea of a chip breaker/ cap iron was to help prevent chatter with thin irons. Good plane design will also help to lessen chatter.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
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    Greeley, CO
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    53
    When I look at the BCT designs they remind me of de-constructed recipes. I don't understand the attraction of either. I do like the Veritas design philosophy. It's a little different with a consistant look/feel and functional improvements. I like the Lie-Nielsen classic design and their improvements. Both companies offer a bargain considering they're manufactured in North America.

    Super expensive planes impress me with the meticulous craftsmanship (much like a $20k watch impresses me). It does seem that the initial act of using one will reduce the value by several hundreds of dollars much like wearing that expensive watch to dinner.
    Last edited by Eric Danstrom; 06-29-2019 at 11:27 AM.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    South West Ontario
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    863
    Quite right Jim, I am also a member of the flat bevel society, the leather hone is the only secondary bevel.

    We can rejoice in diamond plates! They save us from all the grunt work. Our forefathers would have loved them!
    Follow up with a series of Shaptonís and life is not so bad.
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Vienna, Austria
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    Not sure about hand planes (though, block plane with side depth stops can be handy), but they do have affordable squares and miters and sliding bevels. In fact, I'm waiting to receive my order soon with two squares and one miter. The price here in Europe is comparable to all aluminium squares from Incra or Woodpecker. But they have stainless still blades and no "plywood" support lip that makes it hard to check stock sides for square. I know Vesper Tools have a nice compromise with rotating tab to popup when needed but costs double or triple. I say "plywood" because here in Europe we do not understand that design, it is probably good only for sheet materials.

    And Joint Maker Pro... Man, I dream about that for a few years already. Maybe will make my own of sorts.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southern Md
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    1,139
    I do, but I have no 900 planes add the extra I'm well over that :-( cost to play.

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
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    137
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    The folks at FWW are trumpeting the soon to be released Dual Angle Bench Planes from Bridge City Tools. Scary money. I am an extreme tool nerd. I love precision. These planes (and other BCT products) exude substance, quality, and luxury. Am I the only guy that considers them an elegant and horrifically expensive solution desperately seeking a problem? No disrespect to BCT.
    I’m not among their target demographic. (Makes all the difference.) I wouldn’t begin to understand who that person even is. To each their own, live and let live, etc. However, I appreciate the elegant, simple, and understated, so I wouldn’t enjoy using or even possessing anything so extravagant and esoteric.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    South Coastal Massachusetts
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    5,326
    Quote Originally Posted by Kurtis Johnson View Post
    Iím not among their target demographic. (Makes all the difference.)
    Don't own any Automatic watch winders, hovering loudspeakers or custom made driving gloves?

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
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    137
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Matthews View Post
    Don't own any Automatic watch winders, hovering loudspeakers or custom made driving gloves?
    You must have nailed the demographic! Wait! Do you have those things?

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
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    462
    "...a solution desperately seeking a problem..."? Hardly. If that were true then there are tons of tools out there that could be put in that category, including the Domino, CNC machines (for hobbyists), and many other high end machines like Felders. No one needs any high end tool like those to make boxes, drawers, cabinets, furniture, shop projects, etc. However, if a tool makes your woodworking experience more enjoyable because you're using a fine or innovative tool, then it definitely improves your woodworking experience and, maybe even gives you a different outlook on life because it's enjoyable to you to use the tool. Would I buy a $700 - $900 hand plane? I doubt it but I get enjoyment from using my powered tools as much or more than my hand tools; and I have enough sunk into tools overall to never feel I have to buy another one - hand or power.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
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    1,306
    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Heinemann View Post
    "...a solution desperately seeking a problem..."? Hardly. If that were true then there are tons of tools out there that could be put in that category, including the Domino, CNC machines (for hobbyists), and many other high end machines like Felders. No one needs any high end tool like those to make boxes, drawers, cabinets, furniture, shop projects, etc. However, if a tool makes your woodworking experience more enjoyable because you're using a fine or innovative tool, then it definitely improves your woodworking experience and, maybe even gives you a different outlook on life because it's enjoyable to you to use the tool. Would I buy a $700 - $900 hand plane? I doubt it but I get enjoyment from using my powered tools as much or more than my hand tools; and I have enough sunk into tools overall to never feel I have to buy another one - hand or power.
    My point (perhaps poorly articulated) was that the plane nut had already been cracked. Touting features that add questionable value (dual angle) is the solution seeking a problem. "I need the ability to remove the iron from my $700 block plane and reverse it to deal with this pesky end grain" is something said by no one ever.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    My point (perhaps poorly articulated) was that the plane nut had already been cracked. Touting features that add questionable value (dual angle) is the solution seeking a problem. "I need the ability to remove the iron from my $700 block plane and reverse it to deal with this pesky end grain" is something said by no one ever.
    Rob, it is important to consider the time this plane was designed and built. This was still the height of high cutting angles as the means to control tearout. Today, with the wisdom of years since, we understand that there are alternatives. This makes the dual angle notion appear over done. Further, I really doubt that BCT bench planes are actually purchased to be used to build, say, furniture. The are devilishly clever in design, unique in their offerings, and desired as art. There are clearly a number who (used to?) collect them when they were built in small quantities. Now the market place is being opened up by the new owner. No longer do they have that same collector status, and they are having to compete with all the other planes being offered. Some will succeed and some (like this one) will likely not.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  12. #57
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    Jan 2007
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    Michiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Rob, it is important to consider the time this plane was designed and built. This was still the height of high cutting angles as the means to control tearout. Today, with the wisdom of years since, we understand that there are alternatives. This makes the dual angle notion appear over done. Further, I really doubt that BCT bench planes are actually purchased to be used to build, say, furniture. The are devilishly clever in design, unique in their offerings, and desired as art. There are clearly a number who (used to?) collect them when they were built in small quantities. Now the market place is being opened up by the new owner. No longer do they have that same collector status, and they are having to compete with all the other planes being offered. Some will succeed and some (like this one) will likely not.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    I understand your point. BST does make works of precision art. The layout tools they used to produce are like bench jewels. I’d love to own some. I also want to wear an Omega but my Tissot keeps the same time for 90% less. I’d understand if they’d promote them in that manner instead of touting questionable improvements in utility. Again, no disrespect to BST.

    I had an idea the other day. A dual purpose chisel configured like a tuning fork. One side a standard bench grind, the other a paring grind. Rough work with one, finesse with the other. Just flip it over and never miss a beat. A socket handle fashioned from petrified mastodon bone. Elegant. A devil to sharpen, but elegant. I’m thinking $800. Do you suppose I could get any traction? Maybe I could convince Rob Lee to feature it next April?
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  13. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    I had an idea the other day. A dual purpose chisel configured like a tuning fork. One side a standard bench grind, the other a paring grind. Rough work with one, finesse with the other. Just flip it over and never miss a beat. A socket handle fashioned from petrified mastodon bone. Elegant. A devil to sharpen, but elegant. Iím thinking $800. Do you suppose I could get any traction? Maybe I could convince Rob Lee to feature it next April?
    Brilliant! I love the idea! If LV makes it out of PMV11, it should sell out quickly on April 1.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
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    Why stop at double-sided? Imagine a four-sided cross or even more ... a whole set of chisels arranged in a circle ! The ideas are endless ... off to take my meds ...

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    DuBois, PA
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    1,677
    My watch winder stopped and I don't feel like resetting a bunch of automatics (let alone choosing), so today it's a Timex!


    Anyhow, some buy BCT, some buy Harbor Freight and that's what makes the world go round.
    If the thunder don't get you, the lightning will.

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