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Thread: First class and planes

  1. #1

    First class and planes

    Just got done with my first class. And onto the next soon.


    i took a class where started with white oak thick logs. split them and used froes to rip boards. Riving.we planned the boards down. The goal was a Viking toolchest. Now I’m more of a blacksmith so the next step the metal wasn’t to complicated. However it’s got it hooks in me!

    now for class picked up a scrub plane and # 4 plane.

    what planes would you suggest next in order? What beginner tools would you say make sure to get for this in particular ?

    rabbet plane ( I borrowed one)
    #7 plane
    jack plane
    foreplane over a #7 plane

  2. #2
    Definitely jack plane next. Very handy and usually readily available used pretty inexpensively. Good for basic flattening and can be used for edge jointing in a pinch. Actually having a couple or more is nice, then you can have one with a cambered blade for heavy cuts, and one with a flatter blade and a finer mouth for edge jointing or more refined flattening. Some folks prefer a single low angle jack with multiple blades for this, but for me, that isn't compatible with my patience level and it costs more than multiple standard angle planes.

    After that, I'd say block plane, then maybe a longer plane like a fore or jointer.

    Warning, plane acquisition can be habit forming. Below is only one cabinet.

    IMG_5275.jpg
    Last edited by Andrew Seemann; 06-26-2019 at 12:32 AM.

  3. #3
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    Howdy Jamie and welcome to the Creek.

    What plane comes next depends on a few things.

    Are you planning on buying new or used?

    How big are the pieces on which you intend to be working?

    The jack plane gains its moniker from being a 'jack of all trades'. It is very versatile. If you are riving a lot of wood, it can be fitted with a cambered blade to be used as a scrub plane. For stock in the 3 to 4' range it can be used like a jointer. A jointer would have a straighter edge. A #5 with a blade very slightly cambered or no camber blade makes a nice long smoother. Set the mouth tight and the chip breaker close.

    If you are buying used, #5 planes are rather common and can be purchased relatively inexpensively. Buying a used #7 requires a bit of luck to be in the right place at the right time. It does happen. One came to be for less than $25. It required a lot of work:

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?114373

    It is now a nice usable plane.

    If you are looking for used, check the pawn shops, antique shops and other second hand stores.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 06-26-2019 at 1:37 AM. Reason: changed word & added more to the jack plane versitility
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Derudder View Post
    Just got done with my first class. And onto the next soon.


    i took a class where started with white oak thick logs. split them and used froes to rip boards. Riving.we planned the boards down. The goal was a Viking toolchest. Now I’m more of a blacksmith so the next step the metal wasn’t to complicated. However it’s got it hooks in me!

    now for class picked up a scrub plane and # 4 plane.

    what planes would you suggest next in order? What beginner tools would you say make sure to get for this in particular ?

    rabbet plane ( I borrowed one)
    #7 plane
    jack plane
    foreplane over a #7 plane
    Jamie,

    Living in the desert allows me to have a lot of tools. That said, my true working tool kit is pretty small because I use machines to prep my stock. Planes, a #4 and a #5 Jack (cambered iron), a few wide paring chisels, a half dozen or so bench chisels. a rabbit, a plow, a router, and a #140 block plane. Too many squares of all kinds along with marking knives and bevels and way too many saws. I will not go into stones but will say I've never met a stone I didn't love.

    Depending on what you want to do, make stuff or play with tools. If it is make stuff buy good new and go to work. If you enjoy playing with tools you can find all kinds of used tools to spend your time and money on. In the end the cost is about the same either way.

    ken

  5. #5
    I have from smithing acquired a kick on new tools.


    So I really like what I read and will probably be going for Lee valley tools. However we all know lifestyle creep exists so will be spreading it out as thatís important too.

    pics from class! My hands still hurt though ..

  6. #6
    Welcome to the forum, Jamie.

    The traditional kit for this work is four wooden planes:

    Jack plane 16" with cambered iron for rough work
    Trying plane 22" for truing the surface.
    Jointer plane 30" for making edge joints and refining
    Smooth plane for cleaning up finished work

    Metal planes can be substituted for all of these and a kit of #5, #7, an either #3 or #4 will work. The jack plane and the trying plane are used for the bulk of planing, however, and since they are more comfortable and less tiring to use than the metal planes, wooden are preferred.

    I recommend avoiding the bevel up planes; these were designed by people who did not know how to use planes. Not for serious work.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Mickley View Post
    I recommend avoiding the bevel up planes; these were designed by people who did not know how to use planes. Not for serious work.
    Uh oh. Incoming!
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  8. #8
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    Jamie a jack plane would be next, immensely useful tool. Your boards are shorter than a #7 but that would be next.
    I have a bevel up jack and #7. They can be very frustrating but occasionally do a better job than bevel down for some woods. I would stick to regular for now.
    Wooden planes are shocking in how light and fast they work, I have a couple and love them but tuning takes more time, no simple knob to twist. A wooden #7 would save some money (mine cost $10) and it’s just to fine tune an edge or a top, not the grunt work.
    Last edited by William Fretwell; 06-26-2019 at 10:29 AM.
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  9. #9
    Been searching and found Jim Bode, is there any other sites that have drops on woodworking tools like this? Obviously ebay..anything else?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Derudder View Post
    Been searching and found Jim Bode, is there any other sites that have drops on woodworking tools like this? Obviously ebay..anything else?
    Hi Jamie,

    Maybe it is my age that has me wondering what you mean by "have drops on."

    Patrick Leach has a monthly email list of tools for sale. Even when no tool purchase are being considered his list is one of my must reads for the educational value.

    Start here:

    http://www.supertool.com

    To sign up for the monthly list click on > Old Tools < in the links across the lower part of the page.

    For information on Stanley planes, click on > Patrick's Blood & Gore <.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  11. #11
    Drop on: internet lingo for sites you shop on that randomly will put up items that you are in search of ..

    You have to beat everyone else if you are in search of something. Itís a clever business strategy really as ( in the case of Jim bode..etcetc) as it keeps you checking out the site. Tons of internet merchants do it especially as the items go up in collectibility/need.

  12. #12
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    Might look at timetestedtools.....Don Wilwol is a member here....

  13. #13
    Picked up a few , found a couple of older ones for about $40 a 3 and 6, picked up a 5/7 for more. Have some projects to refurb these.

    Anyone know if taking a 2x72 belts/ scrotchbrite belt to these is a good decision. It should give it a nice satin look.. but the patina will be gone. Will this make these instant rust ?

    (I live in phoenix)

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    First I would try a rust remover with fine wire wool on non painted surfaces. If you have to flatten the bottoms tape a large sheet of sand paper to a flat granite surface and do a figure of 8. Wipe clean surfaces with Johnsonís paste wax to protect from rust. A Peter Sellers rag in a can for the bottom during use and after will stop rust, not likely where you live!
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  15. #15
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    I think you need at least one draw knife for rough shaping.

    https://www.woodcraft.com/search?utf...3-f27dbc56136d

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