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Thread: Priming OSB

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    NH
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    Priming OSB

    Hi Folks, I am getting ready to paint my shop. The first step will be to apply primer to the OSB. I have the rough side out so no waxy stuff to worry about. Just wondering if anyone has done this and what you used. Internet searches pretty much all say to oil based primer.
    Izzy

  2. #2
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    Feb 2007
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    southeast Michigan
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    Izzy, I've done this on the walls in 2 shops so far. And I've use Kilz. I just wanted white to help with the lighting. And even though it's a primer I never intended, and didn't, put a finish coat on. First shop was sprayed and second one was rolled. I do have an occasional spot where there was a little bleed through but not enough to bother me. I'd probably go over those areas if I were to put a finish coat on.

  3. #3
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    It almost doesn't matter what you use because the first coat is going to get soaked up a lot. OSB was never intended to be painted or even exposed. Once you get the first coat on and it dries, subsequent coats will adhere and cover much better. Spraying with an airless and back-rolling makes the job go easier if that's a possibility for you.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Okotoks AB
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    I sprayed latex primer followed by 1 coat of semigloss, sprayed as well. Did both coats in one evening. My OSB is smooth side out. There was a smooth coating of some kind on it, but definitely not waxy. I've never seen OSB with a waxy coating. Maybe it's a regional thing. Anyway, the paint stuck like snot to a blanket & there has been no discoloration from the OSB.

  5. #5
    Probably overkill, but I used SW premium wall and wood primer on mine and it worked very well. I did not bother to topcoat it as I only wanted to improve light reflectivity and a single coat of the primer got me a long way there.

  6. #6
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    Mar 2003
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    Upland CA
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    What I can tell you is that PVA primer for drywall does NOT work well on OSB.

    My new garage is drywalled and has an uncovered 7X14 ridge beam. We shot it with PVA and two coats white paint, and it still didn't cover well, although the drywall is fine.

    I never thought it would work well on the OSB, but went ahead, because it doesn't show up as bad as if we left it natural. Just wanted a nice bright surface to help with lighting.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Ada, Oklahoma
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    I put OSB in my shop and primed the sheets with oil based Kilz before putting it up and then top coated it with a latex paint after it was up and it looks good. I did need one small piece to finish out a small area and it wasn't primed with Kilz, I just coated it with the a couple of coats of the top coat paint. There was a definite difference in the smoothness of the surfaces. The piece without the Kilz primer is a lot rougher like the moisture raised the grain making it a rough surface. YMMV.

  8. #8
    I didn't prime it at all, just went straight to the top coat.

    I had 5 gallons of paint a painter friend of mine gave me.

    He told me don't worry about primer. No issues whatsoever. Apparently he was right.

    I laid on first coat thick and followed up with a second coat.

    No issues.

  9. #9
    Kilz2. It will take two coats of primer.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    SoCal
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    Rolled Zinsser BIN, no problem, nice and white. Topped with cheap white semi gloss.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Okotoks AB
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Rolled Zinsser BIN, no problem, nice and white. Topped with cheap white semi gloss.
    The one problem I did have with the paint was that where I'd used latex caulk to seal up gaps, the paint went kinda sticky, so those areas had dust & dirt stick to them. I went over them with Bin & then semigloss & problem gone. It's good stuff.

    I attribute the problem with the caulk to the crappy Behr paint (it's never happened with other brands) I used. That was the last straw for Behr & I'll never use it again. Terrible paint.

  12. #12
    Just curious, why OSB for a shop wall. We can't use it around here if exposed to high humidity. It swells lengthwise, buckles and looks "flakey" If a house with OSB is left empty for a year, the siding starts to look wavy.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Hilbert Jr View Post
    Just curious, why OSB for a shop wall. We can't use it around here if exposed to high humidity. It swells lengthwise, buckles and looks "flakey" If a house with OSB is left empty for a year, the siding starts to look wavy.
    It's inexpensive, strong and holds screws well. Summertime humidity isn't usually above 40%, except for short term weather events. Sometimes my shop gets quite humid in the winter from snow melt off the cars & there has been no effect on the OSB on the walls & ceiling.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Hilbert Jr View Post
    Just curious, why OSB for a shop wall. We can't use it around here if exposed to high humidity. It swells lengthwise, buckles and looks "flakey" If a house with OSB is left empty for a year, the siding starts to look wavy.
    It's not exposed to "high moisture" on the inside of the shop...unless there is a leak. Regular humidity isn't the issue, for the most part. Personally, I don't like the stuff, but the price is right for many folks.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    NH
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    https://www.sherwin-williams.com/pai...ilbased-primer
    Thanks for all the replies. It seems like there is some leeway it what can be used. The above link was a primer someone local recommended. Sorry about it being above I did not have control on that. I do have a sprayer an have used it a lot so I can go with that. It seems like oil primer will not raise the wood chips so I will probably go with an oil based primer and the a latex paint.

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