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Thread: Repair a broken chair leg

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    Hi Jeff,
    For this particular application, either of the items you have mentioned will work fine. Take is from a mechanical engineer with many years of experience. Let me know if you require a further explanation.
    David
    Hi David,
    For most applications ,I will agree that any metal might be 'overkill', that's why I said "highly stressed". But nobody mentioned any sizes, and his pictures would not 'download for me. Take that from a cabinetmaker that started fixing broken chairs in 1969. I'll stand by what I wrote .

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Davies View Post
    Hi David,
    For most applications ,I will agree that any metal might be 'overkill', that's why I said "highly stressed". But nobody mentioned any sizes, and his pictures would not 'download for me. Take that from a cabinetmaker that started fixing broken chairs in 1969. I'll stand by what I wrote .
    Hi Jeff,
    Effective around the beginning of May 2019, you will now need to become a "Contributor" to see photos at SMC. You can become a "Contributor" for as little as $6 per year. Perhaps if you could see the photos, you would have a more clear understanding of my response.
    David

    https://sawmillcreek.org/announcement.php?f=7&a=26

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Davies View Post
    be aware that threaded rod and rebar and the like are relatively flexible and should not be used on highly stressed joints- only tempered or hardened steel will do.
    With a tensile yield strength of 36 ksi, I suspect ordinary mild steel would be about 100 times as strong as any wood known to man...or 50X as strong as any epoxy...not that I've ever seen any threaded rod or rebar made from A36. (Usually it's stronger.)

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Tucson, Arizona
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Reverb View Post
    With a tensile yield strength of 36 ksi, I suspect ordinary mild steel would be about 100 times as strong as any wood known to man...or 50X as strong as any epoxy...not that I've ever seen any threaded rod or rebar made from A36. (Usually it's stronger.)
    Exactly my point. Heat treated alloy steel rod or a hardened grade 8 bolt are not required for this.
    David

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
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    1,438
    Unless it's a priceless antique where originality is paramount I'd make a new leg with the grain running the right direction. Any of the "insert a whatever" solutions will be difficult to set up and do and probably leave evidence of a ragged break. Just re-glueing will probably also not be perfect and will be subject to another break nearby.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    546
    I think the suggestions of gluing the leg back together with slow setting epoxy, and then later drilling up thru the foot and gluing in either a steel rod or a hardwood dowel with straight grain would work.

    You should avoid having to sand any of the surface of that leg - you'll never be able to re-stain and finish it to match what it looks like now, unless you have years of experience refinishing furniture.

    If you use epoxy to re-glue the leg together, you can use white vinegar to clean off the epoxy squeeze out. If you use alcohol or acetone you might strip the finish and stain.

  7. #22
    I'm finding that my Gorilla wood glue that I typically use, or even Titebond is not appropriate for this job. I'd like to try a good epoxy to start the project's initial break, then I will attempt to drill up from the bottom. Please recommend a good epoxy to buy, and if I have to pre-mix it pryer to applications that's fine. Lowe's and Home Depot are nearby, Woodcraft is a good 50 minutes by car. What epoxy do you suggest?

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    Hi Jeff,
    Effective around the beginning of May 2019, you will now need to become a "Contributor" to see photos at SMC. You can become a "Contributor" for as little as $6 per year. Perhaps if you could see the photos, you would have a more clear understanding of my response.
    David

    https://sawmillcreek.org/announcement.php?f=7&a=26
    yep, I couldn't even see my own pics until I paid for it

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    folsom, california
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    93
    you can order epoxies online and get them delivered. west, and system three are two good name brands that have good online support and guidance. there are many more that would work. most epoxies are too thin to fill gaps, so adding small amount of wood flour (superfine wood dust from your sander) or microspheres helps the epoxy span gaps.

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    Unless it's a priceless antique where originality is paramount I'd make a new leg with the grain running the right direction. Any of the "insert a whatever" solutions will be difficult to set up and do and probably leave evidence of a ragged break. Just re-glueing will probably also not be perfect and will be subject to another break nearby.
    It's a fancy carved design leg so that probably won't happen. Would never match the other 3 legs

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Exeter, CA
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    352
    Also be aware the JB weld is black, don't get any on outside of leg....

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
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    688
    If the leg breaks again it could hurt someone, possibly badly. That leg was made with defective wood. The grain is all wrong. A new leg is needed and a careful examination of the others is in order.

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