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Thread: Sound damping butyl on Dust Collectors?

  1. #1

    Sound damping butyl on Dust Collectors?

    So I've been fixing up my old car, and came across a bunch of people adding Dynamat and other Butyl/Asphalt based materials to their doors, roofs and trucks to cut down on vibrations, and hence noise.

    Here's a good example of such a install.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3635GyE_lE

    Here's the material.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...49e96b9b988901

    Checking on my own cyclone, I can definitely feel it vibrating in the cone, but the intake, and impeller housing don't see to be vibrating.

    I'm personally pretty happy with 75-80 dbs I'm getting on my cyclone, so I'm not tempted to buy one of these kits, but has anybody else tried this? What results, if any, did you get? Seems quicker, and cheaper than a cabinet.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    5,098
    Iím following this thread. I remember putting dynamat in my car as a teenager.

    Not sure if I want to cover up that nice clear CV cyclone though.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
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    8,056
    When reading the ClearVue and other forums, the consensus seemed to be relatively little noise was coming from the intake and cone but a lot of of noise was coming from the exhaust. Some people extended the exhaust before the filters (or when exhausting outside) and wrapped it with insulation.

    JKJ


    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew More View Post
    So I've been fixing up my old car, and came across a bunch of people adding Dynamat and other Butyl/Asphalt based materials to their doors, roofs and trucks to cut down on vibrations, and hence noise.

    Here's a good example of such a install.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3635GyE_lE

    Here's the material.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...49e96b9b988901

    Checking on my own cyclone, I can definitely feel it vibrating in the cone, but the intake, and impeller housing don't see to be vibrating.

    I'm personally pretty happy with 75-80 dbs I'm getting on my cyclone, so I'm not tempted to buy one of these kits, but has anybody else tried this? What results, if any, did you get? Seems quicker, and cheaper than a cabinet.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,863
    Yes, dampening noise on the exhaust can have a noticeable effect. I was at Brian Holcolmb's last week and hear first-hand the effect of the new Oneida muffler he installed on his system which is in a "hard surface" space. It was still loud, but considerably more tolerable than it was previously. So aside from limiting "direct" noise transmission by physical isolation, working on the exhaust side of things should be very helpful.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    When reading the ClearVue and other forums, the consensus seemed to be relatively little noise was coming from the intake and cone but a lot of of noise was coming from the exhaust. Some people extended the exhaust before the filters (or when exhausting outside) and wrapped it with insulation.

    JKJ
    That's been my experience as well. I think I got a 5-10 db drop with venting the cyclone outside. It's tone also changed to a lower tone that was easier to ignore. At this point I generally don't even notice that it's on, though usually I'm wearing hearing protection due to the saw or whatever I'm also operating.

  6. #6
    When I bought my car 2 years ago rather than buy the "sound" package for 3500 to get a decent stereo I decided to do one myself and got a ridiculous one for that price. Followed by a year of sound deadening research to stop the buzzing and outside sound somewhat.

    Just attaching dynamat by itself doesn't deaden sound, though it Will deaden buzzing vibrations. The thing for full-on sound deadening is Mass Loaded Vinyl (MLV). It needs to have airspace between it and the door/wall/whatever, so light closed-cell rubber foam is used. You can buy this in big rolls and surround your sound cabinet for a substantial dB reduction (10?). I'm skeptical that putting this all around DC would do much unless the DC was isolated in it's own room/cabinet though.

    You can do a test, sounds silly but tape, say, your ladder or some mdf to the door, that will have more effect than a mat, much more density to stop vibration.

    I think almost all the sound is coming from intake and exhaust, and through the piping there. Run a couple loops of gorilla tape around the pipe and see if that deadens the vibration at all.

    muffling, exhausting outside seem to have Much more bang for the buck.

    Unless of course you, like me, have the best sounding most expensive car stereo to ever play books on tape 95% of the time, of course.

  7. #7
    Sound suppression is kinda hard to nail down. I did Dynamat in my 2002's and couldn't tell the difference, but they were old cars and not made for silence. I think before trying to wrap the cyclone I'd wrap it with a moving blanket or such and see if it works.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
    Posts
    1,434
    I'm just looking at upgrading the bag on my ancient but heavy duty industrial DC to a modern canister filter. It blew out another hole, so it seems to be time.

    It seems I'll have to build a plenum box to go between the output flange and the new canister. The recommendation seems to be to line the plenum box with carpet, but that really seems like an invitation to a mess. I 've wondered about some kind of foam that wouldn't accumulate dust, but I'm not sure it would actually make any difference at all.

    While the DC is now loud, it's not horrible and I always have ear protection on when it's running anyway, so it doesn't bother me.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,741
    hand sanding, sweeping or maybe lathe work are the only jobs I can think of that you could hear the dc over powertool noise with your earplugs in. So I would say it is a waste of time since the dc air flow will be too loud to allow no ear protection anyway.
    Bill D

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    1,106
    My 5 HP DC is pretty quiet. I can easily carry on normal conversation & hearing protection certainly is not needed when only it is running. I leave it running if it'll only be 5 or 10 minutes until I need it again, so it's nice to be able to take the hearing protection off.

    The collector has a 'silencer' that consist of a foam rubber sleeve that extends for a foot or so into the filter. I can't say how effective it is cause I've never done a comparison.

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