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Thread: How do you suggest I fasten maple to the frame of this bench for a seamless look?

  1. #1

    How do you suggest I fasten maple to the frame of this bench for a seamless look?

    My initial thought is to countersink, glue, screw, and conceal screws with matching plugs. Im afraid it wont allow for proper wood movement though. I live in an area that doesnt have wild seasonal shifts so feel a bit better about that. But I am taking precautions when milling before its time to assemble; acclimate stock inside the house, mill to rough dimensions, bring stock back inside after being in the shop, mill to final dimensions before assembly (obviously the maple in photo is incomplete). The bench is 72x16x18 if that helps. Face boards will end up 3/4" after final plane.

    Any other ideas or am I overthinking it?

    Sorry for sideways photos.

    IMG_7477.jpgIMG_7478.jpgIMG_7479.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
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    8,568
    Look into table top fasteners -- sometimes called figure-8 clips. They allow a sliding joint between your frame and the maple. You'd glue one edge of the maple panel, and use the fasteners to hold the rest of the panel to the frame. I'd probably glue the top edge for a gap-free fit to the top, and let the seasonal gap happen at the floor. There's gonna be gaps at the floor in any case; no floor is flat.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Cumberland, Maryland
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    303
    Tongue and groove?
    You only need 2 tools in life. If it's supposed to move and doesn't... use WD40. If it moves and shouldn't... use duct tape.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    Look into table top fasteners -- sometimes called figure-8 clips. They allow a sliding joint between your frame and the maple. You'd glue one edge of the maple panel, and use the fasteners to hold the rest of the panel to the frame. I'd probably glue the top edge for a gap-free fit to the top, and let the seasonal gap happen at the floor. There's gonna be gaps at the floor in any case; no floor is flat.
    The figure 8 fasteners would be the easiest way to mount your panels since your frame is already assembled.
    mb62uza.jpg
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    Look into table top fasteners -- sometimes called figure-8 clips. They allow a sliding joint between your frame and the maple. You'd glue one edge of the maple panel, and use the fasteners to hold the rest of the panel to the frame. I'd probably glue the top edge for a gap-free fit to the top, and let the seasonal gap happen at the floor. There's gonna be gaps at the floor in any case; no floor is flat.
    Thanks for your reply. That makes sense. I've used figure 8s attaching a few table tops.

    In addition to gluing the top edge, are you saying I should glue up the front (and sides) to create to a large panel? Originally I was thinking attaching board by board. I guess my concern is if I glue up a panel then there will be some wonkiness as the front would be 72x16" and the 4 boards will be pretty thin once they're dimensioned. I started with 4/4 stock.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Torrey Cazalas View Post
    Thanks for your reply. That makes sense. I've used figure 8s attaching a few table tops.

    In addition to gluing the top edge, are you saying I should glue up the front (and sides) to create to a large panel? Originally I was thinking attaching board by board. I guess my concern is if I glue up a panel then there will be some wonkiness as the front would be 72x16" and the 4 boards will be pretty thin once they're dimensioned. I started with 4/4 stock.
    The solid panel will make everything stiffer. 3/4" thickness should be plenty. You could get away with less thickness if you want less weight.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

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