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Thread: Protecting hardwood stairs during renovation

  1. #1
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    Protecting hardwood stairs during renovation

    Doing some renovation upstairs and want to protect the hardwood stairs. Drop cloths are too slippery, rosin paper with painter’s tape won’t stay in place...afraid to use duct or gorilla tape...don’t really have an inconspicuous place to try it. The hardwood is finished with Glitsa.

    Any suggestions/recommendations would be appreciated.

  2. #2
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    I have used 1/8" hardboard (Masonite), with the textured side up. A 23 ga. pin shot near the inside corners holds it. The pins can be pulled out after the job is over with end cutting nippers, but don't shoot them too close into the corners, so you can get the nippers on the pins. You can pull the hardboard up by hand, leaving the pins. They stayed in place fine, and the holes are so tiny that no one will notice them.

    I did this in an old house when we were plastering the walls above the stairs. We put down 6 mil poly sheeting, and the hardboard pieces went over that, and held the plastic in place too. When that job was finished, and we took the stair coverings up, they were as clean underneath the covering as the day we wrapped them.

  3. #3
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    Phil, I just finished spraying my garage doors. To mask off the stucco I used Scotch #2060 “concrete, brick & grout” tape.
    It is stickier than regular painters tape but not nearly like duct or gorilla tape. I had it on for about a day and it peeled off without removing any old paint, stucco, etc.

    Scotch also makes a rough-surface or hard to stick surfaces tape you might try.

    I found it at a local Sherwin Williams paint store. Maybe it will work with rosin paper or some other heavy paper.
    Last edited by Mark Daily; 06-10-2019 at 2:47 PM.
    “Learn what you can control and what you cannot..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
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  4. #4
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    I use painters "clean release" duct tape for lots of things too, other than what it was intended for. It would work on floor finish, and not harm it. The steps we were protecting with hardboard were unfinished in an 1828 house.

    I stocked up on this particular type, but believe it's been replaced with something else now.
    https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company-...3369434&rt=rud

    edited to add: I believe this is what it's been replaced with, but haven't tried this particular type yet.
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/3M-Scotc...5-HD/100653893
    Last edited by Tom M King; 06-10-2019 at 3:19 PM.

  5. #5
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    Mark and Tom, thank you! I have a Sherwin Williams and HD nearby...will give them a try.

  6. #6
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    1/8" ply or hardboard sheet plus double sided tape.

  7. #7
    Ramboard is also great. it's not as thick as 1/8 hardboard and easy to cut with a knife.

    For cleanup - Try Naptha it will take any sticky residue off without hurting the Glitsa. Naptha is great for removing adhesives - It lets's the adhesive "ball up" rather than smear. Great for contact cement when doing laminate work.

  8. #8
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    Ram-board (a brand name for a roll of thick non-corrugated cardboard) cut into strips works well too.

  9. #9
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    We're renovating a rental right now & have the floors covered with roofing underlayment.

    I'll check out exactly what it is. It's not the black felt stuff, it's a thin lightweight material that lays perfectly flat - with no annoying curl from being stored in a roll & it's very walkable.
    I'll be going to the house in a couple hours so I'll find out what brand it is & get back to this thread this afternoon.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  10. #10
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    All that synthetic roof wrap is very similar. It's a major improvement over tar paper in ease of handling on a roof, and very grippy for feet, but it's not cheap.

  11. #11
    I've never had an instance where painters tape did not stick. You might want to clean the areas with alcohol before applying the tape. If left on too long, they often leave an imprint. I know they're not supposed to, but they often do.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hockenberg View Post
    Ramboard is also great. it's not as thick as 1/8 hardboard and easy to cut with a knife.

    For cleanup - Try Naptha it will take any sticky residue off without hurting the Glitsa. Naptha is great for removing adhesives - It lets's the adhesive "ball up" rather than smear. Great for contact cement when doing laminate work.
    Mark, thanks for mentioning Ramboard. I’ve never heard of it before, but I can think of a number of past projects I could’ve used it for. I’ll just file this away in the ole’ brain-box for future reference.
    “Learn what you can control and what you cannot..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

  13. #13
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    So the plumber came today to do some rough in work and brought a roll of Trimaco X-Board. Seems similar to the Ramboard. We put it down with the 3M tape Tom suggested (No residue). It seems to be staying in place well. We’ll see how it goes when it gets pulled up in a few weeks. And Mark, thanks for Naptha suggestion.

  14. #14
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    All that synthetic roof wrap is very similar. It's a major improvement over tar paper in ease of handling on a roof, and very grippy for feet, but it's not cheap.
    Ain't that the truth! The stuff we're using is Tyvek Protec - runs about $45 for a 4 foot by 50 foot.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

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