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Thread: Air Fitting Confusion...HELP!

  1. #1

    Air Fitting Confusion...HELP!

    I'm trying to get together all the air fittings I need for various nail guns and air tools. Shopping online is really confusing, when you're used to going to HD and just grabbing what fits.
    I have a 3/8" T that I want to use a 3/8" hose for blasting and air tools and a 1/4"(?) for nailers. I found a 3/8 Milton V style coupler, which is high flow. I also found a 1/4 Milton V style coupler for the other leg. Now, I also saw 3/8 couple, 1/4"...what the heck is that...is it 3/8 or 1/4? What plugs do I need to use with what couplers? See...I am confused!

  2. #2
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    Here is Milton's website page on couplers. Each coupler type/style comes in a variety of ends to fit different sizes of hose, and other fittings. Once you pick a coupler style, the two mating, quick-connect parts are always the same. You pick what you need beyond that.

    All of mine are H-style, for no better reason than that was what came with a bunch of nailguns, and hoses when I bought my first batch direct from Senco in 1974, and I have stuck with that to keep everything the same. Fortunately, they are a high flow fitting, and work fine on anything from all my spray guns, up through 1" impact wrench, and pneumatic rock drill.

    Home Depot doesn't have much of a selection. Even if you have some industrial supply place near you, they're probably cheaper, and with better selection online.

    https://www.miltonindustries.com/ind...4ebh805vugcac7

    edited to add: The selection may not be entirely complete, but individual parts are a lot cheaper off Amazon than direct from Milton. There are other companies that make fancier couplings, but I've managed to make a living with these for a long time.
    Last edited by Tom M King; 06-09-2019 at 5:42 PM.

  3. #3
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    Hi Derek,
    Please post the link or a photo to the fittings in question and we will try to help you out.
    David

  4. #4
    I think what's confusing to me is that I'm looking at 3/8" quick connects, but they say 1/4" flow, so that means it's got a 3/8" male thread, but with 1/4" ID? I'm thinking that a 3/8" quick connect should have 3/8" ID, but I guess that's not the case?
    I've been advised to use 3/8" to my blast cabinet, so I should be getting a 3/8" high flow quick connect and for the male plug, I should use the 3/8" high flow plug? Oh...with 3/8" hose?
    Last edited by Derek Arita; 06-09-2019 at 6:54 PM.

  5. #5
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    I looked on that page that I linked to. The V-style comes with either 1/4", or 3/8" pipe thread fittings. The quick-connect part of any of the V-style fittings will work together. They must be 3/8" openings through the fittings, judging by the flow ratings. With 1/4" PT they flow 60 cfm, and with 3/8" PT, 74 cfm. Either will flow way more than that compressor will furnish.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    I looked on that page that I linked to. The V-style comes with either 1/4", or 3/8" pipe thread fittings. The quick-connect part of any of the V-style fittings will work together. They must be 3/8" openings through the fittings, judging by the flow ratings. With 1/4" PT they flow 60 cfm, and with 3/8" PT, 74 cfm. Either will flow way more than that compressor will furnish.
    Thanks so much. I think I'm just going to use the 1/4 Milton high flow push connects and 1/4" plugs. Thank you for the help. I'm starting from a 3/8" T, so I'll have to adapt down to a 1/4", then the Miltons. By the way, I use Flexzilla 3/8" hose, with 1/4" fittings, so that should help too.
    Last edited by Derek Arita; 06-09-2019 at 7:51 PM.

  7. #7
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    The 1/4" fittings on Flexilla hose are plastic, and have a larger hole through them than regular, metal fittings have. I have one of those hoses, and it's held up fine for about a year now. I bought one of their replacement ends, and tried it on a cheap, blue hose that came from TSC, but the fitting didn't hold on that hose. Just be aware that the threaded ends are plastic, and don't torque on them too much when putting something on the end of it.

  8. #8
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    Simplify this a little for me too. I looked on that Milton site and it looks like there’s about 10 different styles (a, aa, m, v...) not to mention size... For a typical shop which is the “norm” to use and why so many different styles.
    Bob C

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cooper View Post
    Simplify this a little for me too. I looked on that Milton site and it looks like there’s about 10 different styles (a, aa, m, v...) not to mention size... For a typical shop which is the “norm” to use and why so many different styles.
    Hi Bob,

    I have taken some photos of the typical air hose/connector configuration here in my shop. I use 3/4" rigid copper tubing from the compressor to the various locations in my shop. All my flexible air hoses are 3/8" ID with 1/4" NPT threaded fittings. The first photo shows a typical connection with a factory hose end. The second photo shows a typical connection when making up shorter hoses from bulk hose. The barbed fitting can be either crimped with sleeve, or a hose clamp can be used in place of the sleeve. I like the GoodYear air hose - made in USA - I buy it from Northern Tool in 50 ft. rolls. I like the air couplers from Central Pneumatic. These are available at Harbor Freight for under $5 per set. I use the crimper when I make up custom hoses for the planishing hammers I manufacture. My compressor is 7.5 HP rated at 24 cfm. I run glass beaders (sand blaster), spray guns, air tools, cnc tool changers, etc. with no problems due to lack of air supply. In the old days, I bought all my air hose and fittings from Grainger - SpeedAire brand. The air coupler/quick connects were of the same configuration as the ones shown in the photo.

    Many of the styles have to do with things like method of chuck release, size and configuration of threaded ends (male, female, size, etc.). I really don't pay any attention to that. I have not studied the Milton catalog, but I'm pretty sure that all the different manufacturers pretty much offer these same styles in their line of connectors and fittings. I'm not sure if I have answered your question. Let me know if you need more information.

    David


    Typical Air Hose Connectors.jpg Air Hose Connectors for Crimping or Hose Clamp.jpg GoodYear Air Hose.jpg Quick Connect Set.jpg Crimper.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
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    Bob, I just did a google search for "why so many styles of air couplers" and it looks like there is no clear answer to your question.

    David, I like that crimper. I've been using the 2-eared kind for no better reason than I was given a handfull of them back when I bought my first setup. The 2-eared clamps have never given me any trouble, but I like your kind a lot better.

    I don't have any reason to want to switch from the H-style, which is a high flow style, but I have never seen them used anywhere else that I've been. I keep new plugs on hand in various sizes, so when I get some new air tool I have what I need to put it to work.

  11. #11
    Wow David! Thanks for all info. The pics really help to spell out the details. Big help.

  12. #12
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    Thanks so much for taking the time to take the pictures. I too like that crimper. I’m going to be investing in a decent compressor and plumbing the shop soon and thought while I’m doing it this might be a good time to consider the fittings I’ve collected over the years. It’s always been whatever HD or Northern has that matched what I had before. So never knew there were “high flow”, etc.

    my next task task is really to layout the lines as I’d like to use copper vs something like a rapid aire (sp?). I mostly do wood working but do paint, work on cars, .... just like to round out the shop as time permits.

    Thanks for all all the input
    Bob C

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