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Thread: D-Day: 75 years

  1. #1

    D-Day: 75 years

    It's hard to believe it's been this long. I've never met anyone who landed on the beaches on D-Day. I've always admired their bravery - it couldn't have been easy to be a 20 year old facing that. There's a short article on D-Day that I found interesting from the FDR Library. LINK

    Thanks once again to all veterans.

    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  2. #2
    I've known a few men that landed on D-day and others who fought in the war and to a man they are very humble about what they did and most are reluctant to talk about it. My Dad was in the Army Air Force during WWII in the Pacific and he told us little of what he did. There were a few photos in the family album of where he was stationed in Tinian.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 06-06-2019 at 8:08 AM.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
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  3. #3
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    From the President:

    WWII D Day Letter from General Dwight Eisenhouer.jpg

    New_York_Times_June6_1944.jpg

    My Dad was in the Navy somewhere in the Pacific on D-Day.
    Dads Navy Picture.jpg
    Last edited by Keith Outten; 06-06-2019 at 9:25 AM.

  4. #4
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    I knew a few men who were involved in the D-Day invasion. 5 of my uncles were all in the pacific, three in Hawaii when Pearl was hit. There is a reason they are the Greatest Generation. Now we have to tell teenagers not to eat laundry soap. My grandfather was carrying a BAR on the front lines in Korea when he was 17.
    Andrew Gibson
    Infinity Cutting Tools

  5. #5
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    Without question, the bravest of the brave. To go onto an open beach knowing your enemy can see you and they are protected can hardly be imagined. We can be thankful that they were there. We can be just as thankful for those who serve today that have the will to do it if necessary.
    Jim

  6. #6
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    It is even hard to try and imagine how different our lives would be if it were not for those brave soldiers. Bless them and their families for their bravery and for their willingness to do what needed to be done.
    Jim

  7. #7
    The young ones of today would never even have tried.

  8. #8
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    I had uncles that served in WWII. They all came back.

  9. #9
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    It seemed appropriate to hang my flag today. I used to work with a man who was on the Arizona at Pearl Harbor. A family friend was in the 'Graves' unit in the army. His job after D-Day, gathering bodies, must have been unbelievably soul rending.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  10. #10
    I had 9 uncles and my Dad in WWII. At least 3 were involved in D-Day. One a paratrooper (shrapnel wounds from neck to heels), one an aircraft mechanic in the Air Corps in England, one an infantryman. Two served in the Pacific theater. Two were wounded but all came home.

    My best friend received a battlefield commission after his outfit moved inland from the beaches. He was about 10 years older than me and a truly remarkable fellow.

    I've been to the cemeteries in France twice. It is a sobering and tearful experience. I was 8 years old and remember more than one might expect about the times.
    Mike Null

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  11. #11
    The gut wrenching fear of facing combat has remained unchanged since the first cave man picked up a rock or a stick. Modern warfare made it both better and worse. Facing into and moving forward under mortar and automatic weapons fire is the ultimate unnatural act. Honor all who have faced this daunting task whether they served at D-Day or elsewhere in WWII. D-Day is just the most well known symbol for dozens of other opposed landings.
    Dave Anderson
    Chester Toolworks LLC
    Chester, NH

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Hilbert Jr View Post
    The young ones of today would never even have tried.
    Mr. Hilbert, you should think before posting something like that. Plenty of young men today would and have demonstrated their personal courage on a hundred battlefields around the world.

    You may not read about them the same way you read about the men who landed on Omaha Beach, but that is a reflection of current politics, not a reflection on those who have served under fire over the last two decades.

  13. #13
    Right on Mr. Lawrence!
    Mike Null

    St. Louis Laser, Inc.

    Trotec Speedy 300, 80 watt
    Woodworking shop CLTT and Laser Sublimation
    Evolis Card Printer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Hilbert Jr View Post
    The young ones of today would never even have tried.
    You should have been there to cross the river on landing craft at Hue during TET of 1968 and been first off when the ramp dropped.
    Jim

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Hilbert Jr View Post
    The young ones of today would never even have tried.
    I would suggest you are mistaken sir. I have a son who is currently serving and 2 grandsons who are currently serving. In late July I will fly to Norfolk for a short 2 day stay where I will attend the our current CPO oldest grandson's commissioning ceremony where he is being commissioned as a Limited Duty Officer aboard the USS John C Stennis.

    His younger brother just returned from duty in Kuwait with the Army National Guard, his second deployment.

    As someone who served if the US Navy for 8 years, 1968-1976, I sailed aboard the USS Carl Vinson for 3 days in 2000. There I observed a lot of young women and men who are serving as honorably, and as well as my generation did. My wife would argue against your statement in much stronger language than I as she sailed in January 2002 aboard the USS Carl Vinson for 10 days from Pearl Harbor to San Diego to Bremerton, WA as it was returning from flying missions over Afghanistan where it's 3 squadrons dropped over 20 million pounds of ordinance. From "vultures row" she observed carrier landings, takeoffs of jets, prop jobs and helicopters. With my oldest grandson's service in the US Navy, he is the 4th consecutive generation of my family to proudly serve in the US Navy.

    We have also had 3 generations serve in the US Army in our family. Our oldest son served 9 years in the US Army including duty in Operation Desert Shield and combat in Operation Desert Storm where he ended up in Iraq.

    You realize that our entire military is all volunteer, no draftees?

    I would suggest we would never know how a generation might react until the world is placed in a similar situation.

    Don't condemn an entire generation because of the drivel you might see on television. Get out and experience the world.
    Last edited by Ken Fitzgerald; 06-06-2019 at 9:54 PM.
    Ken

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