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Thread: 2 SawStop questions?

  1. #1

    2 SawStop questions?

    1) What are you guys using to clean the top?

    2) The owners manual shows plans to make feather boards. How are these feather boards attached to the table?

    I'm extremely discouraged with woodworking today. I had to put a 1/4" groove into the edge of two 64" pieces of 3/4" cherry and since (of course) the boards were bowed a little I ended up making total hack grooves since I couldn't keep the stock flat against the fence. Wood costs way too much to be making this kind of firepit kindling.

  2. #2
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    1.) CRC 3-36 (Available on Amazon). FWW magazine rated it their favorite a few years ago as a lubricant, but I find that it cleans pretty well too. WD-40 another good cleaner, but not the best rust preventer.

    2.) I use Magswitch magnetic featherboards. Every once and a while I'll use some Kreg non-magnetic ones that fit in the miter slots, but the magnetic ones are just so quick and easy to use.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Woodworking is 75% planing, the more I plan the better my product. I did a cutout today that required about 15 setups to complete. I missed one slight detail where I could have gained bearing surface but removed it, so I have something to improve upon next time I do the same cutout.

    Point is that whenever we rush to do, we learn where we failed. In some weird way, it should be cherished as that is where we learn to improve.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Sorry to hear youre discouraged but as Brian said planning is key, and so is properly dried/stickered wood and proper stock preparation. You need to know the MC is low enough. Boards need to be flat and parallel, so jointed and planed - but do a rough milling, then sticker for a week or so, the final mill.

    Otherwise the example you gave happens, then you struggle with the glueup and the you pull your hair out and end up making expensive firewood that burns really well.

    What Im getting at is there are a lot of things to know how to do before youll get that 1/4 groove right. Take it a lesson learned. Maybe work with ply or secondary woods for a few projects first.

  5. #5
    If I need 3/4" stock there really is no room for milling when I'm using 3/4" stock. It would be a shame and a waste to be forced to buy already expensive stock at 8/4 just to have the ability to mill it flat and parallel to 3/4"

  6. #6
    I always use a handheld router to make long grooves and dados because of the bow that might be in the wood. The router will follow the board, while trying to cut it on the table saw leads to variations in depth, as you discovered.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    If you need 3/4 stock then buy 4/4 or 5/4 stock, that is, assuming you are milling your own lumber and not buying S4S.

  8. #8
    I use the typical plywood feather boards as SS show in their manual. I had some difficulty mounting them so they would just stay put. I solved it by making a long 2 wide stiff leg with a dovetail cut at 90* into the FB. I have blocks that sit on the fence and allow secure clamping of the FB on both rails of the fence. It is simple and has worked out quite well for me. Oh, and Im with you all the way on material costs. My mistakes are not mechanical. My mistakes are always mental. The machines always do what they are supposed to do. Life is a humbling experience👍

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    I always use a handheld router to make long grooves and dados because of the bow that might be in the wood. The router will follow the board, while trying to cut it on the table saw leads to variations in depth, as you discovered.

    Mike
    Ding, ding, ding! My answer to these problems as well.

    router-dado-example.jpg
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 06-03-2019 at 4:05 PM.
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  10. #10
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    I never groove with a handheld router if I can avoid it. I prefer the router table with feather boards/Jessem wheels.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  11. #11
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    I would do that groove on the shaper with the bow up so the ends are floating high. Rock the stock around so it is flat on the table near the cutter as it moves by. You can do the same on a tablesaw but it risks kickback and you can not use feather boards except one right over the arbor.
    Bill D

  12. #12
    I use Boeshield "Rust Free" and a scotch-brite pad to remove stubborn rust spots. If the rust is light a little Boeshield T9 can be used to scrub it out with the scotch-brite pad. The T9 is also good for general cleaning of cast iron surfaces. If you spray on a heavy coating and allow it to dry, it will form a protective layer - useful if you wont be using a particular machine for a long time. My general sequence is first use the rust free and pad for individual spots of rust, then I spray and wipe down the whole surface with T9. I then clean off the T9 with an aerosol degreaser like White Lightning Clean Streak (I use this on my bikes, and it's available in most bike shops). I finish up with a paste floor wax or Renaissance tool wax.

    I also like the magswitch feather boards - can be used on any machine with a cast iron surface. You can also make your own feather boards and I use some miter bar hardware available from the various woodworking suppliers. These bars are available in short or long version and have a mechanism to lock them into position in the miter slot. Very handy.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    When I stopped buying lumber already surfaced to 3/4" my frustration dropped a ton and the quality of my work improved greatly. I now only buy rough-sawn lumber and it's usually 15/16" thick. I cut to rough width and length and then surface so I get perfectly straight and flat boards. WOW what a change.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
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    It also pays to search around for commercial lumber suppliers. They often have much better board size choices at better prices than the big box stores.

    Some will sell you just what you need and others have a minimum purchase, but it usually doesn't take very much, from a project requirement standpoint, to reach that minimum.

    Also, do a search for local woodworking clubs in your area, they usually have plenty of folk with knowledge where to buy good lumber.

    I don't see a location in your profile. It helps having that as others who read this forum and are fairly local to you can often chime in with good locations for resources.

    I also use the Magswitch feather boards on my SawStop, they are cheap, have great strength and can be positioned pretty much anywhere on the table top.

  15. #15
    I clamp a board to the saw's top. Feather boards get screwed top that.

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