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Thread: Split Top Roubo Suggestions

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Thicket, TX
    Posts
    102
    If knock down is needed have you considered a Monrovian style bench?

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by John Isgren View Post
    If knock down is needed have you considered a Monrovian style bench?
    Thanks, I didn't want to sound like a broken record but even if you don't need "knock-down" the Moravian has many advantages over a Roubo/French bench. The ability to knock down is just the cherry on top. Full disclosure I have two French style benches and three Moravian style benches in my shop and currently building a fourth Moravian. BTW, when talking about knock down, I know by using bench bolts and other means a Roubo can be made to take apart but with a Moravian the bench can be broken down into its seven units is a minute or two and put back together as fast. I think there is a video of Will Myers putting one of his benches together in less than a minute.

    ken
    Last edited by ken hatch; 06-12-2019 at 10:49 AM.

  3. #18
    The Moravian definitely looks like the better knockdown option. I really only plan to take it apart once when I move out of this apartment though, which honestly probably wonít be for a few years anyways.

    Iím too far in to switch things up at this point though, with all my wood cut within a couple inches of final length for the Roubo. if I were to angle the legs like the Moravian my bench would be about 3 inches too low for my height, and the long stretchers would be too short. Also looking through the build, it looks a bit past my skill level at this stage with the angled tusk through tenons. The split top Roubo seems pretty simple (right angles) except for the wagon vise since Iíve already got both slabs finished.

    My next step is to start working on the mortise and tenons. Iím pretty confident in my mortising abilities, but not so much in the tenon cutting department. Iíve been putting off the rest of the build while working on some other projects and practicing my sawing skills in the mean time. Will probably get started on the base in earnest here in the next couple weeks.

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by James Brislawn View Post
    The Moravian definitely looks like the better knockdown option. I really only plan to take it apart once when I move out of this apartment though, which honestly probably won’t be for a few years anyways.

    I’m too far in to switch things up at this point though, with all my wood cut within a couple inches of final length for the Roubo. if I were to angle the legs like the Moravian my bench would be about 3 inches too low for my height, and the long stretchers would be too short. Also looking through the build, it looks a bit past my skill level at this stage with the angled tusk through tenons. The split top Roubo seems pretty simple (right angles) except for the wagon vise since I’ve already got both slabs finished.

    My next step is to start working on the mortise and tenons. I’m pretty confident in my mortising abilities, but not so much in the tenon cutting department. I’ve been putting off the rest of the build while working on some other projects and practicing my sawing skills in the mean time. Will probably get started on the base in earnest here in the next couple weeks.
    James,

    I did not post about the Moravian bench until someone else posted mostly because I figured you had already settled in on a Roubo. Like I have posted, I have a couple of Roubo style benches and they have served well and I expect they will continue to do so. That said, any new construction will be a Moravian because of its advantages of cost, ease of build, and of course ease of break down for moving and/or part replacement. Good luck on your build and keep the photos and posts coming as it progresses.

    ken

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by ken hatch View Post
    James,

    I did not post about the Moravian bench until someone else posted mostly because I figured you had already settled in on a Roubo. Like I have posted, I have a couple of Roubo style benches and they have served well and I expect they will continue to do so. That said, any new construction will be a Moravian because of its advantages of cost, ease of build, and of course ease of break down for moving and/or part replacement. Good luck on your build and keep the photos and posts coming as it progresses.

    ken
    Yeah, I was mostly answering Johnís question of whether Iíd considered Moravian or not, which I guess was a no until I was already too far in lol. I didnít start this thread until the wood was cut, purchased and hanging out in my apartment. Wood aside though, I think the skill requirement is beyond me for the time being anyways.

    I saw your build thread and am very aware of your position on the Moravian workbench haha. Iíd definitely love to take a look at your stable of benches one of these days. Sorry this weekend didnít work out, I only saw your PM Monday and Iím only off Saturdays and Tuesdays anyways. It looks like youíre pretty close though, I live downtown right by the art museum.

    I think all my initial questions from this thread were answered. Once I get the base going I may update it with build pics and any new questions that arise. I should really get working on it though to clear up some space, finally have my bench at the right height and reclaim the use of my two sawhorses that are currently serving temporary base duties.

  6. #21
    After 4 benches I can honestly say that getting the height right is the most important part of the build. I built a temporary bench and played with the height. I came up with 34 1/2 inches for height for me and my type of woodworking. Now I like to stand on a anti fatigue mat when working at the bench and even that thickness played in the final height. The thickness was around 7/16ths so my actual working heights for me is 34 and a 1/2 inch difference can make a difference after a long day at the bench. I don't know how the jointer got in there but I use the feather boards to square up the actual 4x4s that made up the legs. to hard for me at 72 to keep it against the fence and feed it at the same time.

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    Last edited by Tom Bussey; 06-16-2019 at 7:36 PM.
    Tom

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