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Thread: Most commonly used bits

  1. #1
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    Most commonly used bits

    As i get up and running with this Shark HD4, i wanted to get a few more bits to play around with. The spindle is either 1.5-2.2kw with a 1/4" collet. I currently have two 1/4" end mills and a 90° v bit. I was going to pick up some form of a surfacing bit, a 60° v bit, and the rest im up in the air on. I assume a 1/8" end mill is worthwhile to have. Do people typically need more detail than that? 1/8" sounds like im going to break bits, let alone going 1/16" or similar.

    Anyone have recommendations or a favorite source? In the past ive used router bit world for freud bits.

  2. #2
    For my 1/4" and smaller carbide endmills I source them from drillman1 on eBay. For my 3/8" and 1/2", I don't have one particular source. For most common endmills, choose the size that suits your work, but I use:
    2 flute square/flat bottom endmill
    2 flute ball nose (round bottom) endmill
    2 flute V endmills

    Then I have some specialty endmills for cutting fiberglass, etc-- but they don't see a lot of use. I have some single flute for plastics and a couple of 3 flutes as needed. However, buying 4 fluted endmills was a mistake and I handed those off to a buddy that does metal work.

    The end mills I wish I would have gotten early were a selection of V ones. I have 30, 45, 60, and 90 degree endmills. I had terrible luck with endmills similar to this, but once I tried endmills like this, I never went back. The tip is so sharp you can easily prick your finger. On the first type, I had fuzz in the bottom of my grooves and it turned me off to the V ones for quite some time initially. Regardless, V-carving just produces such crisp and good looking signage that can't be duplicated any other way.
    Licensed Professional Engineer,
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  3. #3
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    I would want these available initially and that's based on what I find myself using the most: .25" and .125" end mills (both up-cut and down-cut and all two flute), .125" ball nose, 90V and 60V and something to dress your spoilboard at a minimum. You will likely want to add a pretty slender tapered ball nose once you start to get into more detail, too. All of these cutters are available with .25" shanks. That's for wood. If you decide to cut plastic, there are some variants that cut better in the O-flute single flute category. If you get interested in finer work and need to support smaller cutters, you'll want to pick up a .125" collet for your spindle...that's much better than using bushings.

    One thing: these cutters are all "disposables". Expect to replace them from time to time; sometimes because of, um...a boo-boo that breaks them...and sometimes because they just get dull. Collets also wear and it's good to be very anal about keeping them clean, including separating the collet from the collet nut to do it thoroughly. NEVER drop the collet on the floor...it can damage it and make it unsafe.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Kane View Post
    I assume a 1/8" end mill is worthwhile to have. Do people typically need more detail than that? 1/8" sounds like im going to break bits, let alone going 1/16" or similar.
    With a spindle (you really need to figure out if you have a 1.5 or 2.2, they use different collet types, you need to buy the right collets) there is usually much less runout than routers, and you can use smaller bits successfully. Don't be afraid, the 1/8 bits are tougher than you think, I have run them at 200ipm (even downcut!). I have used 1mm bits (.039") fairly frequently, have smaller, but not had cause to use them. I have seen people using .023 for guitar frets. eBay seller “Drillman1” https://www.ebay.com/str/carbideplus has bits that go down to .010 (maybe smaller), he is very reasonably priced - buy the 10 packs of 1/8". I have had great results with the "Kyocera" brand (USA made), he also has some Onsrud and other quality brands, but is not a full line dealer for them.

    Last edited by Richard Gonzalez; 05-28-2019 at 9:21 PM.
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  5. #5
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    Richard, I just bought a couple of those .023" bits for fret slots. LOL "little bites" necessary for sure!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
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    Jim,
    You'll have to let us know how it goes! I have found that cleaning the collet, and shaft of spindle to make sure there is not a spec of dust or debris is critical with the small bits.
    https://www.precisebits.com/tutorial...eprocedure.htm

    Don't be afraid to call up Ron Reed at Precisebits for advice, he is very knowledgeable and willing to help.
    Colorado Woodworkers Guild
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  7. #7
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    I just checked, it is 1.5kw with an er11 collet. These links are fantastic. I appreciate the budget options, knowing full well I’m going to screw up and snap a handful.

    Anyone have a surfacing bit they like for a 1/4” shank?

  8. #8
    What bits you have would take care of the majority of what I do. Keep your feed speeds modest and the shark is pretty forgiving on bits. I don't recall ever breaking one with it. I would look at a surfacing bit for your spoilboard and stick with the bits you have. Add you find you need a different bit then add as needed. Otherwise you will wind up buying things that you will never use. Add you decide that you want to do specific things you will determine what bits you need. I wouldn't spend much on bits at first until you learn speed and feed rates for your machine

  9. #9
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    The Whiteside 6210 will fit your 1/4" collet and is pretty reasonably priced. I have and use it for spoilboard and surfacing solid stock (items too small or too wide for my jointer) or items like cutting boards.
    Last edited by Richard Gonzalez; 05-28-2019 at 11:24 PM.
    Colorado Woodworkers Guild
    Colorado CNC User Group

  10. #10
    For no bigger than your table is, a 1 or 1 1/2 " bit would do it in a very reasonable time. It can be as simple as a straight bit or a one special for surfacing. Truth is you probably won't have to use it often so I wouldn't spend too much for one. An inexpensive one will do the job. I think that I just bought a 2 or 2 1/2" on Amazon for $30

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobby milam View Post
    For no bigger than your table is, a 1 or 1 1/2 " bit would do it in a very reasonable time.
    Agree.

    Bobby, I actually use a 1.25" cutter for surfacing and my machine has about a 49"x50" cutting area. Yes, I could easily spin a larger one, but the size I have is also very convenient for surfacing slabs and fine tuning thickness of stock that has to be precise before cutting something into/out of it.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    I use a 1.5 to surface my 4 X 8 table and it only takes 10 to 15 minutes

  13. #13
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    I use 1/16 inch end mills fairly often and I haven't broken one yet.

  14. #14
    I needed to replace a couple of bits yesterday so went on Amazon and ordered a few cheap engraving bits for more detailed work, Got them in today and they look more like a needle than a router bit. We'll see if they hold up or break.

  15. #15
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    Art....022". And I managed not to break it, too!

    IMG_E4496.jpg

    Bobby, I've bought some cutters from both Amazon and EBAY that have worked out fine. There are some good USA-made bits to be had from both sources and for things I tend to use frequently, I like having spares to keep Mr Murphy away. The tiny cutter referenced for that photo I included in this post was ordered via EBAY as I didn't want to pay the horrific shipping costs from PreciseBits for just a couple cutters when I wasn't sure I knew what I was doing.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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