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Thread: What kind of TS setup is this?

  1. #1

    What kind of TS setup is this?

    I'm looking at doing similar thin rips with a bunch of scrap 8/4 walnut for various art projects. Could use some help in identifying this sliding sled setup (?). And could the same results be had fabricating a small wood sled in an even safer manner? I like how he's able to stand almost perpendicular to his work.

    https://youtu.be/rJIYmr05X9Y
    Last edited by Joe Frank; 05-28-2019 at 2:50 PM. Reason: Lumber size

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    The saw is from Minimax. The model name is painted on the front of the machine at 0:24. If what you don't recognize is a sliding table saw, use that as a search phrase. Sliders are sold by Minimax, Felder/Hammer, Laguna, and many others.

  3. #3
    Thank you. A little out of my price range it looks like.

    Still wondering what would be the best way to replicate these cuts?

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Table saw with a high quality rip blade.............Regards, Rod.

    P.S. If you're going to sand them, then a band saw would be fine as well, only sand the surface that shows............Rod.

  5. #5
    In this kind of production format ideally

  6. #6
    If the pieces are short enough you could use a sled on a table saw, what length?

  7. #7
    They'll be anywhere from 4" to 36"

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    I don't a slider, but I use a homemade jig to cut thin slices. Mine is similar to this one https://www.finewoodworking.com/2007...n-the-tablesaw, except that I put a skate board bearing on the end of mine so that the piece being cut slides easier. You can search for thin strip jigs and find lots of designs. The thing they all have in common is that the thin strip is not caught between the fence and the blade. The thin strip is the "off cut".
    Grant
    Ottawa ON

  9. #9
    For 4" pieces it would be easy to make up a jig on a table saw sled. Attach a block say 6" from the blade parallel to the blade on the right side. Make a spacer 6" wide less the thickness of strips you want (add a handle on top to make it easy to remove). Place the spacer in place with the sled clear of the blade, place the workpiece against the spacer and clamp to the sled. remove the spacer, make the cut, remove the strip and repeat. For longer strips I'd use Grant's approach.
    Last edited by Doug Garson; 05-29-2019 at 3:48 PM. Reason: clarified width of spacer

  10. #10
    One of the keys is the sliding fence. By adjusting the fence to terminate in front of the blade, you eliminate binding between the blade and the fence.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    I wouldn't cut those pieces on a table saw at all. The kerf is too wide for what he is doing and wastes too much wood. I would use a band saw instead, which is just as safe if used correctly.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Grant Wilkinson View Post
    I don't a slider, but I use a homemade jig to cut thin slices. Mine is similar to this one https://www.finewoodworking.com/2007...n-the-tablesaw, except that I put a skate board bearing on the end of mine so that the piece being cut slides easier. You can search for thin strip jigs and find lots of designs. The thing they all have in common is that the thin strip is not caught between the fence and the blade. The thin strip is the "off cut".
    Looks similar to the featherboard setups I've seen. The added ball bearing I'm sure makes it nice and smooth. I'd like something like that that looks as effortless as the sliding table.

    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    For 4" pieces it would be easy to make up a jig on a table saw sled. Attach a block say 6" from the blade parallel to the blade on the right side. Make a spacer 6" wide less the thickness of strips you want (add a handle on top to make it easy to remove). Place the spacer in place with the sled clear of the blade, place the workpiece against the spacer and clamp to the sled. remove the spacer, make the cut, remove the strip and repeat. For longer strips I'd use Grant's approach.
    That's exactly what I envisioned doing with a sled. Still have to be behind the sled I suppose though correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    One of the keys is the sliding fence. By adjusting the fence to terminate in front of the blade, you eliminate binding between the blade and the fence.
    Yes sir!

    Quote Originally Posted by Art Mann View Post
    I wouldn't cut those pieces on a table saw at all. The kerf is too wide for what he is doing and wastes too much wood. I would use a band saw instead, which is just as safe if used correctly.
    My band saw table is pretty small. I've been slowly looking at various 16" BS that have more real estate. Just not sure I would be able to cut that many strips in succession nearly as fast though.

  13. #13
    Yes you are behind the sled but the chances of kickback are minimal with the free space for the cut strip and even if kickback happened (which I doubt), it would only be the small strip since the main piece is clamped. If you are concerned you can add a guard to your sled (a simple sheet of acrylic over the blade hinged for access).
    While I agree using a bandsaw would reduce the kerf size, I think you can get a better finish with a good table saw rip blade compared to most band saw blades so some of the gains would be lost in planing or sanding. And 6" strips would be too short for most thickness planers (and maybe belt or drum sanders depending on the spacing between the infeed and outfeed rolls).

  14. #14
    Thanks for the reply.

    That's just it I've not worked on a good band saw to draw any experience from.

    Seems as if it wouldn't be too difficult to take the left side of the ts bed off and modify some sort of sliding attachment with some sort of long drawer guides or something of the sorts? Just a thought...

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    Take a 4" to 6" x 48" piece of 1/2" plywood and cut a 1/2" X 47" piece from one side leaving a hook.
    This makes a ripping fixture.
    You could make it 60" if you want to.

    Set the fixture against the fence with the piece you are ripping against the hook allowing you to rip narrow boards.

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