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Thread: handheld router with big bit

  1. #16
    I would go neanderthal here. I'd use a marking gauge and run a mark on the side and on the top where you want the chamfer to end. Then use a bench plane and plane it down by hand. I've done that before and it's not all that hard.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  2. #17
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    Wow, thanks for all the responses!

    I assumed it was a bit much. The table saw obviously comes to mind, but doing the end grains on a 66" long table sounds terrible. Lots of setup for a one time fixture that I wouldn't want hanging around my already stuffed shop.

    I'll see if the local woodshop can take care of it. $155 for a custom router bit gives me plenty of money to afford a vendor.

  3. #18
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    I also like the hand plane idea. I've been thinking about ripping it with a jig, but doing the endgrain with plane.

  4. #19
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    In my shop I would run it on the shaper with a raised panel cutter below the workpiece and a power feeder. Otherwise I would rough it out with a power plane and clean up with a hand plane and/or belt sander. Curves are not out of the question.

  5. #20
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    Set knife marks, Rough cut with a track saw then finish with hand planes.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  6. #21
    I've done spiral handrails with thumbnail bits in that size range. They have to be cut on a single pass and their is no flat surface to hold the router on. I'll say this, I would never ask anyone else to do such an operation. That being said, I consider your chamber very do-able, with a heavy duty router and good technique. I would get the top on some low horses, so I could really get my weight on top of it.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Set knife marks, Rough cut with a track saw then finish with hand planes.

    This is what I shall do.

    Thanks,

  8. #23
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    Rough with a bandsaw and finish with a hand plane and belt sander.
    Bill D.

  9. #24
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    My biggest custom bit is 4 1/2" in diameter. So obviously I would do it. I use a 3 1/4 hp PC router as it is heavy and solid. Sometimes a router is the best option. I climb cut until it is close and then do a final pass. Would I let a new employee do it? No. If there is fear there is a good chance of a wrong decision.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Edgerton View Post
    My biggest custom bit is 4 1/2" in diameter. So obviously I would do it. I use a 3 1/4 hp PC router as it is heavy and solid. Sometimes a router is the best option. I climb cut until it is close and then do a final pass. Would I let a new employee do it? No. If there is fear there is a good chance of a wrong decision.
    Larry, I feel I have to reiterate that spinning a large bit like that with a hand-held router...even a heavy one...is considered "not a good idea" and can be very dangerous. The force generated by the action can too easily move/throw the tool and cause injury or worse. The industry pretty much consistently recommends nothing larger than about an inch and a half hand-held and they do it in writing and not just for legal protection. It's said in the router documentation and is usually on the tooling packaging, too. I'm saying this not in any way to correct "you" or cause you to personally change what you are comfortable with, but for the benefit of newbies and others who might not know this or might not have read their tool's manual...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by andrew whicker View Post
    This is what I shall do.

    Thanks,
    I hope you post back with a progress report or finished photos of your project. It sounds like an interesting look.
    I'm wondering how it will turn out, and specifically what scale and type of base you might build for a table with an edge profile as you have designed.

    Best of luck with the project.

    Edwin

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrew whicker View Post
    Hi all,

    If I get a custom made router bit for this chamfer and I only take small passes at a time (like 1/16") will handling this router bit be an issue?

    This is a chamfer on a table top that I don't have room to do with my router table. I am will to change the dimensions some. I think it looks good though in my drawings.

    I can sub it out if safety is going to be big concern.

    Attachment 410475
    How will you control taking light passes? What material is table top? This makes a huge difference between somewhat easy and you'd better be a gorilla. Overall, very difficult with hand held.

  13. #28
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    Sigh. You people with nice bandsaws... I hope to be one one day.

  14. #29
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    I 'was' going to use my Festool track as a guide (using the non-plastic side probably). I like the handtool idea though. Makes me feel much more comfy.

  15. #30
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    Oct 2016
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    Definitely. Hoping to get this thing done by mid July. Need to start making some progress right meow.

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