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Thread: Just curious . . . .

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Dickinson, Texas
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    Just curious . . . .

    Do you cut dado joints with a back saw and chisel or with a table saw?

  2. #2
    I use a dado plane

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Clarks Summit PA
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    490
    Have used: scoring a line, chiseling a knife wall, a backsaw & chisel, ; have used scoring a line , then a knife wall with chisel, repeating vertical chisel work supplemented with router plane, ;then bought an HNT Gordon 3/4 dado plane - it works like a dream.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    7,595
    have used:
    Mitre Box to cut the walls, chisel to remove the waste, #39 3/8" dado plane to clean up

    Electric Router, with guide....

    Stanley #45 set up as a dado plane, backsaw to score the entry and exits.

    tablesaw back when I had a dado blade for the saw. Current tablesaw will not accept dado blades.

  5. #5
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    I have done all you guys mentioned.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    There has never been a table saw in my shop.

    Have used an electric router in the past. They are just to noisy and too easy to mess up.

    Now most of my dados are stopped. They are usually cut with a saw, chisels and a router plane.

    There are a few dado planes in the shop still waiting for me to have a bit of time to get them working.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    There has never been a table saw in my shop.

    Have used an electric router in the past. They are just to noisy and too easy to mess up.

    Now most of my dados are stopped.
    I use a Festool OF1400 router, with a Festool (usually the short one) guide rail, for which there are Festool attachments for that router that let you do this very cleanly and precisely. Really fast, safer than a table saw, cleaner results, minimal dust. Really easy to do stopped dados as well, with the assistance of a chisel for the stopped ends.

    You could also do this with hand tools, I suppose, but I prefer to choose my battles. :^) After all, this is a neander forum, but most of us have band saws.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    I use a Festool OF1400 router, with a Festool (usually the short one) guide rail, for which there are Festool attachments for that router that let you do this very cleanly and precisely. Really fast, safer than a table saw, cleaner results, minimal dust. Really easy to do stopped dados as well, with the assistance of a chisel for the stopped ends.

    You could also do this with hand tools, I suppose, but I prefer to choose my battles. :^) After all, this is a neander forum, but most of us have band saws.
    The noise of a router disturbs my ears and a few other senses. With ear protection, it is impossible to hear the music playing.

    Using saws, chisels, mallets, planes and other means of cutting a dado by hand are much more relaxing to me than using power tools.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Missouri
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    1,515
    It depends on the task for me. I usually use a backsaw and chisel on smaller work. I sometimes use a 45 for wider dados. If I had a lot to do or many wide dados, like case work, I would probably use a TS and dado blade. I sometimes will clean up hand cut work with a router plane, such as stopped dados. I guess there are many ways to come to the same end.
    Jim

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    That is my opinion as well.
    It also may depend on the mood I'm in at the time.

  11. #11
    How do I dado? Let me count the ways ....

    I've used every technique mentioned here at least once at one time or another. These days, I most often work with only a couple of dados in a project and I've settled on using a knife cut, a chisel, and a router plane to finish up. It's a satisfyingly simple technique with no set-up required. With sharp tools, it is quick and extremely accurate - particularly when sized to the mating work-piece.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

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