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Thread: Falling Water vs Gamble House

  1. #1
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    Falling Water vs Gamble House

    The difference between these two is ,,,,help me find the words,,,,

  2. #2
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    Falling Water is an architectural deign motif by Frank Lloyd Wright. Gamble House is a Greene and Greene designed house in Pasadena Calif. Look at photos of Falling Water house in Pennsylvania, as opposed to Gamble House in Pasadena.
    I would classify Falling water as being more associated with "Art Deco", but Greene and Greene's style was more an amalgamation of Mission and secessionist style, principally inspired by the Jugendstil art movement, and leaning toward the Art Nouveau.
    Personally I find that Greene and Greene softened the hard,rectilinear lines of the mission style. Wright's work is abundant with hard lines.
    I admire both bodies of work.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  3. #3
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    I like the word "better". Falling Water is better than Gamble. Falling Water was profound at it's inception, and still is. Gamble is nice woodwork in a rather boring house design.

    Just my opinion

  4. #4
    The Gamble House is beautiful. In pictures, it looks more ... ornate? ... than Falling Water. I visited Falling Water and it's just amazing. I love the place. But it was fairly plain inside, with an emphasis on connecting the inside to nature outside. The passage that lets one go from the living room to the water, the slab of vertical windows that let's the woods connect to the upstairs rooms, etc. A few years back they had to shore-up the building to save it, because there were issues. It's quite a place.

    I hope to get to Gamble House soon!
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  5. #5
    Gamble House is a work of art.

    Falling Water is a masterpiece.

    The world is a more beautiful place with both of them in it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    Gamble House is a work of art.

    Falling Water is a masterpiece.
    Edwin I think the opposite. Falling Water is to look at, Gamble House is to look at and to live in.

  7. #7
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    I'm with Tom. Falling Water is visually stunning and has wonderful spaces, but like many FLW designs/structures, it wasn't executed very well physically and has had a lot of problems over the years including some heavy renovation not long ago to stabilize it. I really enjoyed my visit there years ago, however. While I've only seen Gamble House in photos, it's a completely different animal than Falling Water. It feels like a home, both visually and in how it's executed.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
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    AFAIK the Gamble house has no structural issues and the roof does not even leak. I do believe falling Water may be one of the few FLW designs that does not have roof problems. FW looks like living in a museum while the gamble house is designed to be lived in.
    I have read the family that built falling water loved the location before the house was built. They went swimming and sun bathing on picnics there before the house was built. When they realized FLW destroyed the site and turned it into a basement they hated the house. They wanted a house so they could see the site from inside the house by looking out a window not a trapdoor.
    Bill D

    on edit; I looked it up, I was wrong, the roof does leak. I should have known. I am not aware of any FLW building that the roof does either not sag or leak or both.
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 05-24-2019 at 9:50 AM.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I am not aware of any FLW building that the roof does either not sag or leak or both.
    Guggenheim Museum NYC?
    Robie House?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Rozmiarek View Post
    I like the word "better". Falling Water is better than Gamble. Falling Water was profound at it's inception, and still is. Gamble is nice woodwork in a rather boring house design.

    Just my opinion
    .

    Yeah, GH looks like someone dumped a lot of material, hired a bunch of carpenters, then yelled ,"Gentlemen, start your
    hammers !"

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    .

    Yeah, GH looks like someone dumped a lot of material, hired a bunch of carpenters, then yelled ,"Gentlemen, start your
    hammers !"
    Wow, talk about a difference of opinion . What appeals to us cannot really be argued as better or worse. This explains the existence of the bulk of country and rap music. Ka-chow!
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  12. #12
    Since a "bungalow" is a one story house ,why do they call the Gamble House "the ultimate bungalow" ?

  13. #13
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    In my mind, the main thing that Gamble House has against it isn't that the craftsmanship isn't there . . . it's that there's no visual contrast in the wood. Yes there are the signature G&G ebony plugs - but when I was browsing Google images of various rooms - I just got overwhelmed by red-orange. Yes, Falling Water isn't quite as 'homey', much more of a statement piece - but it's less taxing on my senses. If Gamble house had more varieties of wood in the construction to give a larger palette to show off the craftsmanship - it'd be even more impressive.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    .

    Yeah, GH looks like someone dumped a lot of material, hired a bunch of carpenters, then yelled ,"Gentlemen, start your
    hammers !"
    Mel

    I will have to politely disagree with you.
    I grew up in South Pasadena, Eagle Rock, and the Highland Park areas of Los Angeles. I basically grew up with the Greene and Greene style, as well as the "American Bungalow".
    A bungalow is much more than a single story dwelling.
    The Prairie Style of Frank Lloyd Wright is also appealing to me, and I'm sure that there must be examples of his buildings that don't have leaking roofs, based on a design flaw.
    Greene and Greene doesn't appeal to everyone. Gamble House would be over the top for a person not into Greene and Greene.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  15. #15
    Thanks,Mike. I just looked up "bungalow" again. I think the word comes from India,but this time I did not read all
    definitions. It was widely used to describe the GI single story post WW2 houses. Tastes and family sizes change, many
    housed a couple and a bunch of kids. Now few will rent or buy them and whole neighborhoods are being knocked down
    to build larger homes. But this thread is the only place I've seen the word used for anything but single story homes.

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