Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 27

Thread: Shelf fell off wall, embarrassing mistakes?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Lafayette, CO
    Posts
    463

    Shelf fell off wall, embarrassing mistakes?

    I have aluminum floating shelf brackets and put them on the wall with 8 75 lb screw in type hollow wall anchors. placed speakers and some other things on the shelf above the TV, mounted to the wall below, and it all fell down by pulling out the anchors and putting big holes in the drywall. luckily it looks like only my turntable is junk, also sad because it's a 1972 B&O. The TV is fine. SWMBO would like it fixed before we have a dinner party on Friday, what will the relatives say about my repairs to their homes if they see this???

    very embarrassing.

    new plan is to screw a length of 1x4 to the studs, 2 screws in each and then mount the bracket with its screws. does this sound sane? I think the leverage on the compressible drywall was the major failure point.
    The brackets are a kind of C shape that a 3/4 thick shelf fits into and there are screws you can run in from the bottom to pin it from getting pulled out.


    any embarrassing mistakes you would like to share?

  2. #2
    The 1x4 solution will probably work well but it will be visible. If you have to repair the drywall anyway, you might consider cutting a slot out and putting 2x6 blocking between the studs and then drywall over that, giving you solid backing to attach your brackets.

    Alternately, you could use a stronger anchor for your brackets, such as toggle bolts, or the zip-tie-toggle anchors. I've seen those used to install monitor arm/computer arm stations in hospitals and they are super strong and solid.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    2,438
    If you can get it into studs, you will have a lot more holding power. I don't know if a french cleat is appropriate here, but, Depending on the shelf, if it is free hanging and there is nothing that connects the outer edge of the shelf to the wall, it will surely put more stress on the attachment point.

    I have hung many things and never had a problem, but, most of what I have hung has either a good surface against the wall (such as large peg boards or cabinets), or, the other supports that I mentioned. My most consistent failure has been towel bars in the bathrooms. I suspect that children decided that maybe they could use them as support bars. I know that when a curtain came down, a child had been pulling as hard as they could on the heavy curtains; apparently my daughter did not like the color that my wife chose and she wanted them gone out of her room.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    665
    I hung a TV on a 2x4 attached to a wall three years ago. So far so good

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Falls Church, VA
    Posts
    1,119
    Blog Entries
    1
    somewhat off topic: There is a unit of time called the ohnosecond. It is that interval of time where it just dawns on you that you have really screwed up ("Oh No").

  6. #6
    How wide are the brackets? Are they wide enough to span two studs, usually 16" OC? If so, you may only need to drill some mounting holes in the brackets in the correct locations to hit the studs. This would be the easiest solution in my estimation.

    Blocking between the studs is the ideal solution if you're willing to cut and repair the drywall.

    I know a contractor who has a practice of cutting a strip of drywall the length needed, removes it and replaces with 1/2" plywood screwed to the studs. Then tape, mud and paint the patch as best as you can. Usually it will blend in especially if the thing you are mounting to it covers most or all of the strip. This keeps whatever you are mounting flush to the wall, unlike a french cleat. Very important that the strip is screwed to studs, I'd do two screws per stud.

    Don't punish yourself. If the casualty was a vintage B&O turntable, then I say you've already paid a handsome fine. Onward and upward.

    Edwin

  7. #7
    We use steel rod sticking out from the studs.

    The rods are are as deep as they need to be depending on the depth of the shelf. For a 12” shelf we typically go 7-8” out of the wall. The steel rod is welded to 2.5” flat stock roughly a foot tall. It creates a t so that the plate can be screwed to the side face of the studs. At least two per shelf or every 32” on center.

    For solid shelves we Drill and mortise out the piece. Box shelves can be make to sit on the brackets.

    It can take some extra effort but it’s solid.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Lafayette, CO
    Posts
    463
    thanks guys, i had about 75 lbs on it and 8 anchors and a 3 in screw into a stud. haha. the bracket is only about 1.5 or 2 in tall. I think even screwing it to studs on the drywall will make it sag/crush the drywall because of the leverage on the lower edge. the 1x will not be too visible behind the bracket and its a quick fix. it's in a room that will get total re-trim and paint eventually. we are moving through the house one room at a time.

    rakks is the manufacture of the bracket system.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
    Posts
    5,559
    Personally - I favor a piece of plywood over 1 by whitewood if it's some sort of load bearing support.
    I just feel screws hold better in plywood than in 1 by whitewood.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Lafayette, CO
    Posts
    463
    i have some nice poplar on hand that is pretty dense.

  11. #11
    Try these.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Lafayette, CO
    Posts
    463
    drywall is too damaged to use hollow walls now. I would rather not set up the drill press to redrill and countersink the holes the brackets. i screwed the 1x4 poplar to the wall with 3 in spax #8 2 in each of 5 studs. pre drilled to 50% root diameter (which according to NIST gives you the best pull out strength) and then screwed the brackets with supplied screws to the poplar. i'm sure that will be strong enough. brackets lined up about 1/8 above the bottom to avoid leverage on the corner. actually looks quite nice.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    19,541
    1972 B&O turntable damaged!?! Arrrrgh!!!!
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Goleta / Santa Barbara
    Posts
    701
    I'm thinking it is best to reschedule the dinner party. Whatever fix you select, it isn't going to look presentable (to her eye) by tomorrow evening . . . . . .

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,744
    75 pounds is asking a LOT for a floating shelf. Generally I think of them as places to put a handful of knick-knack stuff. If your trying to hold up that kind of weight you need to run steel rods as Neil mentioned. Even a strip of wood is likely not going to work very well with that kind of weight. And the deeper your shelf the greater the leverage. I'd bet the seams wherever you mud up to will crack in short time.

    good luck,
    JeffD

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •