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Thread: Must have safety accessories for older TS

  1. #1

    Must have safety accessories for older TS

    Finally pulled the trigger on a used TS (Ridgid TS 3660) since gaining some spring cleaning workspace. Been some years since I used a TS and feel completely out of date with how modern things are now in the safety dept.

    My main use for it is going to be ripping various walnut,white oak,poplar for smaller furniture craft projects such as small resin river tables for sofa tables, cutting boards,pic frames etc..

    Been researching various riving knives, shark guards, splitters, featherboards (both that attach to your fence as well as magnetic ones), push sticks,and different style sleds. A little overwhelmed to say the least. My understanding is this model does not have a riving knife area to attach to so that option may be out the window.

    I'll be cutting some smaller hard wood pieces mostly so it'd be comforting to get an idea on how most of you are setup these days.

    I should say I also have a chop saw, band saw, and surface planer I plan to use.

    Appreciate any input!

  2. #2
    I use the Micro jig splitter. I don't know of an after market splitter they are tied to the design of the machine.

    I use push blocks not a big fan of push sticks. I make up several at a time out of 2x4's, attach a 1" dowel and toss them when they get chewed up.

    Magnetic featherboards work well and can be used on other machines like bandsaws.

    A simple sled should suffice to start with. A small sled for small parts is handy.

    Finally, I recommend spending some time educating yourself about TS safety. And be aware there are lots of YouTube videos out there with guys doing horribly dangerous things.

    Take time to look at what you're cutting. Learning to read your lumber is important (warps, cups, knots, etc).

    I don't know what you mean by small pieces, but they can be more dangerous to run through a TS.

  3. #3
    I put a sharguard system on my 1980's era contactor. Best upgrade I've done for my safety. now I even have dustcollection. what a difference.
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Engel View Post
    I use the Micro jig splitter. I don't know of an after market splitter they are tied to the design of the machine.

    I use push blocks not a big fan of push sticks. I make up several at a time out of 2x4's, attach a 1" dowel and toss them when they get chewed up.

    Magnetic featherboards work well and can be used on other machines like bandsaws.

    A simple sled should suffice to start with. A small sled for small parts is handy.

    Finally, I recommend spending some time educating yourself about TS safety. And be aware there are lots of YouTube videos out there with guys doing horribly dangerous things.

    Take time to look at what you're cutting. Learning to read your lumber is important (warps, cups, knots, etc).

    I don't know what you mean by small pieces, but they can be more dangerous to run through a TS.
    Thank you for the fast reply.

    I'll check out the micro splitter.

    With regards to small pieces I'll be making various small rips for playing with various wood mosaics (3d and herringbone layouts) on old existing furniture and wall art as well as small rips for cutting boards.

    I've been brushing up on TS safety videos. Modern advancement in video slo-mo definitely creates some shock factor .

    I picked up a good amount of 2" scrap walnut that has some interesting figure. I can already see the blade pinching now.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Michelle Rich View Post
    I put a sharguard system on my 1980's era contactor. Best upgrade I've done for my safety. now I even have dustcollection. what a difference.
    I couldn't find this system in a google search. Is there a different spelling/name?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Frank View Post
    I couldn't find this system in a google search. Is there a different spelling/name?
    Probably meant Shark Guard.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  7. #7
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    That's "sharkguard."

    A riving knife is best, but if that's not possible, do use a splitter of some sort. Another excellent, though pricey, safety add-on is the JessEm clear-cut stock guides. These hold work pieces down on the table and in toward the fence, and they have one-way rollers that help arrest kickbacks. As a bonus, they give you better quality cuts.
    -- Jim

    Mr. Natural sez, "Use the right tool for the job."

  8. #8
    Ah I have an email exchange going with Sharkguard. Thanks for clearing that up.

    Found the JessEm guides last night. Those look pretty trick.. not cheap but they look well thought out.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Engel View Post
    Finally, I recommend spending some time educating yourself about TS safety. And be aware there are lots of YouTube videos out there with guys doing horribly dangerous things.
    x10

    OP, I know this doesn't really answer your question, but iMHO, safe work practices are more important than safety gadgets, since safe practices will protect you against things that gadgets won't. To that end, I'd review and make sure I remembered the safe methods of work. Try not to ever stand behind the blade. Don't reach over the blade, and especially never try to "pull" the workpiece through the saw from behind the blade, as a kickback could pull your hand into the blade. Adjust your fence to give a little more clearance between blade and fence (say 1/32") at the far end of the saw than at the front of the saw. Make sure your blade is parallel to miter slots. Push sticks and feather boards are nice to have and use, and can be made from scrap. Protect your eyes, and put your saw and shop lighting on separate circuits (so that if you throw a breaker with your saw, you're not instantly in the dark). Watch the blade-workpiece interaction at all times, and guard against the workpiece lifting away from the blade, or twisting, or (if you have no riving knife) the kerf closing on the blade like a brake caliper. Clamping work to the miter gauge (and putting sandpaper on the face of the miter fence) can help prevent movement that causes grief. Be safe and have fun.

  10. #10
    Agree with Jacob, technique can be more important than any safety feature you can retrofit to an old saw. As someone else said there are good and bad Youtube videos out there, a good series is Table Saw 101 by Stumpy Nubs aka James Hamilton. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSbS...TeJsFvB2mZjUe6

  11. #11
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    The first thing I would verify is that the fence tightens exactly parallel to the blade and does it repeatedly. A poorly designed or adjusted fence is worse than no splitter or riving knife in my world. Check it and recheck it before ripping wood. Don't try to rip construction lumber or wood not very dry until you get a feel for the machine. Wet lumber ( >12-14% MC ) should go to the bandsaw. Dave

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Frank View Post
    Ah I have an email exchange going with Sharkguard. Thanks for clearing that up.
    I have the TS3650. the stock guard/splitter/pawl assembly was ok but got in the way on occasion. I upgraded my rails and fence to the Incra system and the precision is remarkable. Having done so though, the stock guard assembly does not work with the rear rail. I ended up going with the micro-jig splitter. Very nice solution and the price can't be beat. I mention this because if you are contemplating upgrading the fence/rail system on your saw, any guard system you buy now may restrict your choice of rails/fence systems.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  13. #13
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    Joe,

    The first safety feature for use with the small pieces you mention would be a simple, SMALL sled. There are many on you tube you could check out. I would recommend starting with the really basic type that you could use for a while, while you determine any added features you want to add.

    Second thing I would make is a selection of push blocks/sticks. My favorite is a handsaw handle type, but I have a half dozen for special needs.

    If you want to buy, both these things are available.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  14. #14
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    Good common sense is the best accessory. Think through what you are about to do BEFORE you do it. If the cut doesn’t feel right, don’t do it. A band saw, while it can still be dangerous can cut smaller pieces more safely. Use an easy to access power switch and know where it’s at without having to look for it. Never pull back out of a cut without stopping the blade completely first.
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  15. #15
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    Nobody mentioned sharp blades as a safety feature but they are very important. If you have a dull blade, you have to push the work. If you push the work, you are exerting more force towards the blade. If you slip, it's harder to catch yourself.

    I keep two of every blade (except stacked dado set). Then I'm never tempted to saw just a few more before sending a blade off for sharpening.

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