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Thread: Grizzly G0860 Dust Collector

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Lincoln, NE
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    Post Grizzly G0860 Dust Collector

    This might need to be someplace else but know lots of turners have a dust collector. Need some help on a Grizzly G0860 1 1/5 HP dust collector. It was delivered last Friday and I get it set up over the weekend by myself, used a hoist to lift the motor and fan on to the stand. All put together and ready to run. So I push the button on the start remote and it blows the breaker before the motor even started to spin, start relay clicks and breaker pops. Reset the breaker 20A , #12 wire and it starts fine. This has gone on since Sunday. Once in a while it will start on the first go but 90% of the time breaker pops, I reset it and away we go. Talked to Grizzly tech and they first said I was going to have to go to 25-30A breaker and new plug for the dust collector at my expense. Put on hold and then they tell me I have to have at least 10 feet of hose on the machine which I usually do although I can put my drum sander right beside the collector and use shorter hose. Measured the length of hose and it is flexible type and at 18 feet, added another 10 feet and still the same issue. So thought might be the breaker so I have a unused 20A in the box, move to that breaker. Now the fan starts up but pops the breaker before I reach full speed. Same thing, reset the breaker and away we go. When it gets going it will move lots of air and does a good job, lucky the box is close or I might be more you know what! I am open to any ideas, thought about 2HP machine that runs on 220 but the smaller was all that I need for my small shop. Not very pleased at this point

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    San Diego, Ca
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    There are a lot of things that could be causing your problem. Let me throw out a few things to check out and eliminate from the equation:

    1. Is there anything else on that circuit? (Your DC needs to be on its own dedicated circuit).
    2. Is the breaker a GFCI or AFCI or just an old-fashioned type? Ground-fault and Arc-fault breakers can be touchy.
    3. What is the voltage at the receptacle without turning on the unit, then when the DC is trying to spin up and also once it has come up to speed? I recall reading somewhere that the voltage drop for correctly sized wiring (gauge and run length) should be no more than 5%.
    4. If the voltage drop (item 3) is too large, I'd double check the wiring gauge in the breaker box to confirm that someone didn't just put in a 20 A breaker on a 14 gauge circuit. It is also possible that the run from the breaker box to the DC could be long

    One solution could be 10 Ga wiring and a 30 amp breaker. But why don't you check items 1-4 first.

    Here is an old thread on the same issue: https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....ircuit-breaker

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Trinidad, West Indies
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    #3 is critical.

    MK

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
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    443
    How old is the circuit breaker? One possible issue is that the G0860 is 110v and requires 15 amps. While on paper it doesn't sound close to what a 20 amp circuit breaker should be able to do it's closer than you think. A lot of circuit breakers are actually 80% of what they are rated for. They can handle the full current but only for a few hours. If your breaker is old it might be worth replacing it with a new one of the same current rating. Do not just increase the size of the breaker! It may not be listed but the motor should have an amperage for LRA (locked rotor amps). This is the maximum amount the motor will draw if it's on but not turning. When you first turn it on this is how much current will be drawn. As the motor spins up to speed the current will drop down. Some circuit breakers are designed to handle this extra load better than others. You may have better luck going to an electrical supply store vs a box store. They should be able to help you. The ideal solution would be to put in a 30amp circuit but that may not be easily practical.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    cleveland,tn.
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    357
    it is current electrical code still as far as I know but # 12 wire can use the max. of a 25 amp fuse or breaker. sometimes electric motors will surge a lot more amps to start than you would think I believe it is variables in the start capacitor or start circuit. If you go this route make sure there is no smaller gauge wire has been used between panel and plug. If you are using it as 120 volt converting it to 240 volt would help by spreading out the amp draw to two legs.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    cleveland,tn.
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    357
    I just looked at the griz site to look at the machine it does not have the capability to be converted to 240 volt. So all I can suggest is to verify your wire gauge and place the max of a 25 amp breaker if the wire is 12 gauge or rewire to a 30 amp 125 volt 10 gauge circuit. If you want pick up a inductive amp gauge and see what the starting amp draw is most have a peak hold feature so you can tell the amp draw at start up then you can switch it to show what the normal amp load( tag says running amps to be 15 ) is while it is running. Than you will know if you have a defective motor. The motor should have the running temp. on the motor tag, that will also tell you if the motor is bad if it is running hotter than shown on the tag. I have had good luck with griz warranty issues. Just thought a rewire is necessary if wire is 14 gauge max for it is 15 amps. good luck

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
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    One thing you could try to do would be to install a gate valve(s) at the inlet port. When you turn on the DC have them closed. The DC should extract the air bring it down to a near vacuum very quickly. Once there the motor will only have the rotational mass of the fan for a load.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    San Diego, Ca
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    Steve Mawson,
    It is common etiquette that when a poster asks for advice, gets a bunch of good advice, that they return and give some sort of reply. You have made over a thousand posts, and I'm wondering why you haven't replied.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
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    1,215
    Sorry got busy with other stuff but after some off and on with the collector it now starts without any issues. I did check all the wiring which was all #12 and switched to another unused 20A breaker in the box. Must have just needed to get limbered up but has been working well for the last couple days. Other than being a little noisy it is doing a very nice job. I plan to make a closet in the corner of the shop to install in which should help with the sound.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    cleveland,tn.
    Posts
    357
    well breakers can be defective like anything else or weaken with age( operating at the upper limits of amp draw) or repeated cycles of being tripped, breakers are not really designed to be switches.

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