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Thread: Help roughing in covered back patio

  1. #1

    Help roughing in covered back patio

    Doing some spring cleaning and looking at partially enclosing or fully enclosing my back patio to get me out of my cramped single car garage. Few summers ago I covered it with fiberglass panels 12x24' and am now getting around to roughing in power/lights (on the house siding) and a gutter system. This exposed area is on the southwest corner of my house and gets a bit windy and wet still. I'd like to shield the wind and rain a bit and turn the space into a decent outdoor space for woodworking. Thinking of enclosing the walls a bit in the same vein as an outdoor shed with T1-11 or LP Smartside Paneling. With the concrete pad not being raised and not having a budget to build a raised floor I could use some input.

    I don't want this to be a money pit just a workable space that stays fairly dry. Any help is appreciated!



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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Midland MI
    Posts
    826
    I can't see your pic, I have a little old barn I use for my wood shop. I got free pallets, shimmed them level (had concrete floor but very cracked and rough) then screwed on some cheap plywood. (place on craigslist sold plywood used for shipping crates, I have even seen it listed for free. It made a very nice, dry even floor. probably the screws were most expensive part.

  3. #3
    You can't beat that affordability! Great idea I'm gonna keep that in mind when it's time to build my mother in law haha.

    I've got a pretty big expanse so might be a little out of my budget, I have been keeping an eye out on CL tho!

    Let me see if I can repost the pic differently.

  4. #4
    friendly bump

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Greater Manor Metroplex, TX
    Posts
    194
    Since you are working on a budget (as we all are, unless we are giving others advice) and you are not looking to condition the space, you could just put the same fiberglass panels on the walls and on ends. They would give you some protection from the elements, but allow in the light during the day. You could even hinge the frames for the walls on the ends, so you could open them to get the breeze.

    Since you can afford to raise the floor, I would get some concrete stepping stones or bricks and put any tables/shelves on them to raise them above any water that might get on the ground.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,676
    Might help if we knew where you lived and what the climate is like. Does it ever freeze, get more then 15 inches of rain per year? For cheap I reccomend adobe block but if it rains then you will have to have a concrete foundation.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Mason-Darnell View Post
    Since you are working on a budget (as we all are, unless we are giving others advice) and you are not looking to condition the space, you could just put the same fiberglass panels on the walls and on ends. They would give you some protection from the elements, but allow in the light during the day. You could even hinge the frames for the walls on the ends, so you could open them to get the breeze.

    Since you can afford to raise the floor, I would get some concrete stepping stones or bricks and put any tables/shelves on them to raise them above any water that might get on the ground.
    I like your way of thinking. I was gonna use some of that scrap fiberglas to build mama a greenhouse but she doesn't know that just yet.

    Hinging the walls would be nice or even doing some sort of hanging sliding doors (if they stayed quiet at night).

    As for covering the concrete pad I may be able to install my gutter and dig a small trench to keep dry enough. I'm sure we'll get some rain here by the time I get some walls up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Might help if we knew where you lived and what the climate is like. Does it ever freeze, get more then 15 inches of rain per year? For cheap I reccomend adobe block but if it rains then you will have to have a concrete foundation.
    Oops I'm in Seattle. Doesn't get too cold here but rain and wind can be a factor. Shielding it would be ideal. Adobe is fairly cheap.. what I might do is just keep an eye on craigslist for free or cheap material.

  8. #8
    You might be surprised at how many windows one can get for free. Think greenhouse.

  9. #9
    You're right on the money.. I drove by a couple free French doors few nights ago. Didn't have my truck there in time tho.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,799
    Before you do anything, be sure you check with your local jurisdiction about what's permissible to "just do" and what you might need to change or get permits for. Some areas have rules about things like "enclosing" in a porch/patio, even for casual use. Heck, my township made us put a full footer and mesh in the concrete surface of the covered front porch on our major addition in 2008 simply because "someone might close it in someday". ($$$$) Check on this because getting nailed after-the-fact is unpleasant and expensive.

    That said, and aside from recent weird weather, your climate might be amenable to even roll-up "walls" to provide wind and precipitation protection while also allowing open are when it's really nice out.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
    Posts
    5,556
    Before you do anything, be sure you check with your local jurisdiction about what's permissible to "just do" and what you might need to change or get permits for. Some areas have rules about things like "enclosing" in a porch/patio, even for casual use. Heck, my township made us put a full footer and mesh in the concrete surface of the covered front porch on our major addition in 2008 simply because "someone might close it in someday".
    Excellent advice. I've seen far too many "just do" things that have not only become permanent or - worse yet - been added onto.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  12. #12
    From your photo it seems that you have water issues to deal with first, and from what I see of the grade, downspouts are unlikely to handle the issue. Have you cleared this with the neighbor? You are well within the set-backs all ready and making a lot of noise out there might have the neighbor “dropping a dime” on you. What type of equipment are you looking to put out there?

  13. #13
    Thanks for the suggestions guys.

    Yes the neighbor is fine with things. We live in a not so great area so the covered area is actually an improvement. He's done a few things that aren't up to code as well. Basically my structure is ok if the roof panels were to be removed or lattice was installed.

    As far as the water issue your correct while it's not too bad most of its wind driven from the south opening (the opening closest to the picture). I may try and drape some kind of heavy clear outdoor vinyl and see how that wears.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kapolei Hawaii
    Posts
    2,901
    Water and your expensive shop tools will not get along. My $0.02 would be to spend the money and invest in the raised slab/panels. Spend money now or later. And normally, if you do run permanent power in any "extension", permit required. Do check your local codes. It doesn't rain here as much as Seattle, but I have had a couple inches of standing water in the yard...... Be above the water.
    You could grow grapes or other vine things on the "lattice" on the panels if you build a lattice up there. Let them crawl up there and hide it. I think that would be nice. Cool things down a bit and still let light through. Who says a lattice cannot have a panel below? Well, maybe there's some code preventing that.

  15. #15
    You raise some good points! I'm not happy about having to stick my cast iron ridgid ts outside, especially after just cleaning it.

    I'd love to grow some vibes but don't think we'll be here for longer than 5 years or so.

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