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Thread: Cyclone Chip Collection Bins

  1. #1
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    Cyclone Chip Collection Bins

    I have mostly made up my mind that in the next year I will be purchasing either an Oneida or Clearvue 5 hp Cyclone. The only part I am getting hung up on is the collection bin sizes being so small. My dad has the Grizzly 5hp industrial dust collector which lists the collection bag size as 24 cu ft (~180gal) and when we are skip planing a kiln load of lumber we have to empty it mid way through the load. In my research I haven't found where people attach maybe four 55 gal drums to the bottom of the cyclone. I would be even happier to be able to make one very large bin that is on casters and that I could pick up with the forks on the tractor to be able to dump. Are either of these options possible or do they somehow interfere with the airflow of the cyclone making it not separate as it should? I have 14' ceilings and will run the duct work on the ceiling to all tools so I could raise the cyclone to accommodate any splitter off the bottom of the cyclone.

  2. #2
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    You can make the bin any size you want. If you have the equipment to pick the full bin up, like your forklift, one big bin would be easier to plumb than multiple smaller ones. Build the bin and the plumbing so there's no air leaks. Include a plastic window so you can see how full the bin is.

  3. #3
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    Even a 55 gallon bin can fill up "really fast"...DAMHIKT!!! I use a 55 gallon fiber drum that came with my Oneida setup. It's the largest I can use physically and about the largest I could manage emptying. (I slide it out of the shop mostly and then use the loader of my tractor to transport the barrel to where I dump shavings/dust)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
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    I've gotten so used to wrestling full almost 90 gallon bags that are on Dad's Grizzly that I would welcome wrestling 55 gallon drums with open arms. I just can't believe with so many people running these larger cyclones that there isn't more info on larger collection bins. For me it takes a certain mindset to skip plane 700 or 800 bd ft and continuously having to empty the 55 gallon chip bin would be a pain. I think I will end up building something on pneumatic wheels and be able to wheel it right out to the woods and dump it.

    If any of you know of any write-ups that may discuss this, let me know. I am sure I'm just using the wrong terminology

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dylan Wyatt View Post
    I've gotten so used to wrestling full almost 90 gallon bags that are on Dad's Grizzly that I would welcome wrestling 55 gallon drums with open arms. I just can't believe with so many people running these larger cyclones that there isn't more info on larger collection bins. For me it takes a certain mindset to skip plane 700 or 800 bd ft and continuously having to empty the 55 gallon chip bin would be a pain. I think I will end up building something on pneumatic wheels and be able to wheel it right out to the woods and dump it.

    If any of you know of any write-ups that may discuss this, let me know. I am sure I'm just using the wrong terminology
    In big industrial situations, the chip collection bin is an open truck, or a dumpster. There is a component called a rotary airlock below the cyclone which seals the bottom of the cyclone, and dumps the chips into the dumpster. Here's one from Oneida, https://www.oneida-air.com/dust-coll...tary-air-locks

  6. #6
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    As soon as I read post #4, what Jamie mentions in post #5 immediately came to mind. At that level of chip production, an airlock with a wheeled bin would be the way to go, IMHO.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
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    I definitely agree with both of you about the rotary air lock, but I'm not sure that my wallet will agree, those rotary air locks add quite a bit to the price. We shall see what the future holds. Thanks guys!

  8. #8
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    It sounds like this might be a business situation given the volume you mention. If so, this is a business decision with a chunk of the cost being balanced by the time cost of manually dealing with a filled bin (and potentially clogged filters, etc. beyond with an overfill) and general shop efficiency. And that's before the tax impact discussion with your accountant. Investments in the business that improve the business's ability to work smoothly are always worth consideration.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
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    If you go to a large diameter bin careful of wall thickness. There will be a negative pressure which will want to implode and suck the walls in. So needs to be sturdy enough

  10. #10
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    If you are close to a university with a chemistry department, make contact with the organic chemists. They order silica gel and bulk non-hazardous reagents in barrels. They then just toss the barrels. These barrels have good seals (rubber or silicone gaskets), good lids, and are meant to survive shipping with heavy contents. They're perfect collection barrels for dust collectors, scrap bins, whatever. Go take their barrels, they'll be grateful to not have to fill the dumpster. I run a lab myself, these barrels are perfect for scraps, etc. I just drilled a big hole in a lid and fitted it with my DD, and voila, gigantic bin that doesn't collapse.

  11. #11
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    When I worked at the lab we had 30 yard? dumpster bin with a special sealed lid. I do not think there was a air lock. The lid was supported by a cable set up. It had an inlet and a outlet plumbed into it. The garbage company took the bin away about once a month and brought back the same bin empty after an hour or so. the lid was locked down so it was airtight to the bin.
    Bill D.
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 05-29-2019 at 12:06 AM.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Dylan Wyatt View Post
    I definitely agree with both of you about the rotary air lock, but I'm not sure that my wallet will agree, those rotary air locks add quite a bit to the price. We shall see what the future holds. Thanks guys!
    With 14' ceilings, maybe you could put the cyclone high, then have a sort of "debris chute" that goes from a small collection box, downward at around 45, & out through the wall and into a large external garbage bin. Not unlike an airlock system, but using gravity.

    It MIGHT work.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Speers View Post
    With 14' ceilings, maybe you could put the cyclone high, then have a sort of "debris chute" that goes from a small collection box, downward at around 45, & out through the wall and into a large external garbage bin. Not unlike an airlock system, but using gravity.

    It MIGHT work.
    Physically, it would most likely work, but there would still need to be an absolutely seal on the bin.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Speers View Post
    With 14' ceilings, maybe you could put the cyclone high, then have a sort of "debris chute" that goes from a small collection box, downward at around 45, & out through the wall and into a large external garbage bin. Not unlike an airlock system, but using gravity.

    It MIGHT work.
    I like the idea of having the bin outside, the cyclone will be in the back corner of the shop and while I have made sure to keep walk ways large, it would still be a pain to wheel a large bin around to the front of the shop to pick up with the tractor. I could do a test run with the 45 pointed to inside the shop and if it worked, I would have no problem cutting a hole in the wall to move things outside. Like Jim has stressed, sealing a large bin is the biggest hurdle here, but I think it could be done relatively easy.

  15. #15
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    If you put the cyclone high, remember that you will occasionally need to clean the filter. That is, it should should likely be accessable while you're standing on the floor.

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