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Thread: Shiny Things We Do Not Need?

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Blue View Post
    Kevin that's unlike any torque multiplier I ever used. Looks to specialized to be much use on anything but a wheel.

    That's all it's designed for, removing lug nuts holding on very large wheels and tires...

    What would you need 3400 ft lbs on. 3/4" wheel studs usually are torqued at 450 ft lbs...

    To remove extremely rusted lug nuts, or to actually twist a non-yielding lug bolt until it breaks-?
    All I know is, it's capable of 3400 ft lbs. I'll never need that much torque, but it's there if I ever do!
    There's a 41mm socket in the kit, which I believe corresponds to a 1" bolt diameter, I'll likely never run into anything that big either.
    I bought it only so I don't have to pay someone to remove the wheels from our motorhome,
    and for that purpose it shines. I think I paid $56 for the thing. One dismount/remount costs more than that-
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  2. #17
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    I have the best lug wrench available its called ROAD SIDE SERVICE I never worry about how tight my lug nuts are LOL
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  3. #18
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    If it works as it should, and lasts, it seems like a reasonable tool to have on hand. The price is reflective of Garrett Wade, but it is what it is. We have torque multipliers at work that are similar.
    I think if someone jumps up and down on a new lug wrench, supplied with newer cars, you'll probably end up bending the handle. They're not very strong. The days of long sections of fence pipe used with the lug wrench are 25 years in the rear view mirror.
    I haven't had a wheel installed by someone other than me in over twenty years on any of my vehicles.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  4. #19
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    These days any "pro" will bring up the lug nuts to just tight with a rattle gun (likely with a torque limiting "stick"), then use a torque wrench for final tightening. I set my IR gun to minimum torque then finish off with my torque wrench. That reminds my I need to check the lug nut torque on my wife's car, I just did a brake job last week and lug nut torque needs to be checked after a hundred miles or so...
    NOW you tell me...

  5. #20
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    These days any "pro" will bring up the lug nuts to just tight with a rattle gun (likely with a torque limiting "stick"), then use a torque wrench for final tightening.
    The problem "these days" is there aren't many "pros" working in the average tire shop.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    The problem "these days" is there aren't many "pros" working in the average tire shop.

    jtk
    Our local tire shop chain, Belle Tire, notes on all tire work orders which torque stick to use. And all of the guys (and gals) are required to use a torque wrench on lug nuts. I'll bet that most larger chains do the same. Maybe not in the average one-off tire shop.
    NOW you tell me...

  7. #22
    I take my vehicles to the local Les Schwab, and have for many years. I sit inside and watch them do the work through the windows. They use an air driver to snug the lug nuts on, then lower the vehicle to the ground and use a torque wrench to tighten the nuts. They are very methodical, using the same pattern for each wheel and going around the vehicle the same way every time.

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Meyer View Post
    I take my vehicles to the local Les Schwab, and have for many years. I sit inside and watch them do the work through the windows. They use an air driver to snug the lug nuts on, then lower the vehicle to the ground and use a torque wrench to tighten the nuts. They are very methodical, using the same pattern for each wheel and going around the vehicle the same way every time.
    I take my wheels off the car, put them in the trunk, and drive them down to the tire place to be serviced. (No, not in the same car.)

  9. #24
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    I had a new seal put in the rear axle of my dually a couple of days ago. I know a good mechanic that works to a schedule, so he's the only one I'll go to if I don't want to do something myself.

    The mechanic took the wheel off with a 1/2" battery powered impact driver. Proper torque for the dual wheels is 175 ft./lbs., and I'm sure that's what they were at. I was surprised that the battery powered tool handled those lugs easily. When he put the wheels back on, he used the same impact driver, but final torque was set with a fairly new Snap On torque wrench with beeping signals, and blinking lights.

  10. #25
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    final torque was set with a fairly new Snap On torque wrench with beeping signals, and blinking lights.
    My choice is always for a tool that is simple in design. My old 'beam' torque wrench with the pointer on a scale can be calibrated and certified with little to go wrong. Add a few blinking lights and some beeps, then there is all the electrical circuitry and other do-dads that might have a problem.

    One time a quality engineer was trying to figure why things always needed technicians, like me, to fix things that were being manufactured. My response was if there is a failure rate of 0.001% on incoming parts and something has a thousand parts, then statistically one part is likely going to need replacing on everything produced.

    The look on someone's face from the epiphany when something you point out to them registers can make the whole day enjoyable.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    My choice is always for a tool that is simple in design. My old 'beam' torque wrench with the pointer on a scale can be calibrated and certified with little to go wrong.
    I'm totally up with that. I have the SnapOn torque wrenches, and I have a good set of Tohnichi beam type torque wrenches, and the latter are what I always reach for, unless there are access issues that would work against it. IMO there's no substitute for something that measures against basic physics, on that elemental level, that you can see and feel and nobody can deny. It has a fundamental rightness to it.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    [edited]
    IMO there's no substitute for something that measures against basic physics, on that elemental level, that you can see and feel and nobody can deny. It has a fundamental rightness to it.
    Keeping things simple is often the best course.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #28
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    Tough to read a beam style torque wrench when you are standing up with the wrench at your ankles and be any closer than 20%. I used to have one. Give me a digital click type wrench any day. I have the older Craftsman version in both 3/8" and 1/2" sizes. And the HF wrenches actually tested within a few percent. I have a cheap difficult to read vernier type scale click wrench (3/8") I keep in the Jeep set at 16 ft lbs and locked there (set with my digital 3/8" wrench). Use it for the u-joint bolts that need to be installed every time after I have been towing when I replace the drive shaft.
    NOW you tell me...

  14. #29
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    Tough to read a beam style torque wrench when you are standing up with the wrench at your ankles and be any closer than 20%.
    That is what friends, children and wives are for.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    That is what friends, children and wives are for.

    jtk
    "Hey honey, can you come out here and help me read the torque wrench? Sure as soon as I finish this row of stitching on this head cover for you new driver..."
    NOW you tell me...

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