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Thread: Glue sub-surface

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    N CA
    Posts
    204

    Glue sub-surface

    I was gluing up a panel yesterday and was wondering how you all protect the tops of your benches/tables/floors from the excess glue. I have a 36" roll of rosin paper I put down and a roll lasts a long time, but what other methods/materials do you use to contain the debris in glue-ups?

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Frederick View Post
    I was gluing up a panel yesterday and was wondering how you all protect the tops of your benches/tables/floors from the excess glue. I have a 36" roll of rosin paper I put down and a roll lasts a long time, but what other methods/materials do you use to contain the debris in glue-ups?
    I just put down a sheet of plastic, then wipe up any glue drips.

  3. #3
    House wrap leftovers work great. Free if you know someone building a house.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,868
    I maintain my bench-top with occasional sanding and BLO. What little glue actually sticks to it is easily scraped off. Rarely do I put something down for gluing, but I do cover for finishing tasks "most of the time", but not "all of the time".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Chandler, Az
    Posts
    306
    I wax my top just like it was metal. Glue does not stick and is easily scraped off.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    422
    Rosin paper. Sometimes wax paper.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    1,999
    For small glue ups I use one of those Rockler glue mats. For larger glue ups I have access to large pieces of cardboard and will use that, or as you do, rosin paper.

  8. #8
    My main bench top is coated in epoxy. Nothing sticks to it. I have re-coated it every five years since I built it in 2004, making a little epoxy pooky first, to fill the holes and deep scratches. In between I have found a quick wipe with Pledge once in awhile keeps it slippery. If I have a major glue up to do, or I am using epoxy instead of wood glue I will cover the top with a plastic sheet.
    It is easier to be imperfect and plan for it, than to try to be perfect and swear at it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Cedar Park, TX (NW Austin)
    Posts
    318
    Wax paper, when I am done I just roll it up and throw it away.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    1,616
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Nagle View Post
    Rosin paper. Sometimes wax paper.
    +1 on rosin paper - bought a roll at Home Depot long ago and still have 1/3 of it left.

    I used Watco Teak Oil on my bench when I built it. The varnish in it allows for fairly easy cleanup, although the glue can still get into grain.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Winterville, NC (eastern NC)
    Posts
    1,948
    A good wax coating has worked well for my bench. Glue drips just pop off when dry.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Pueblo, CO
    Posts
    276
    I coat my bench tops with shellac remnants then a coat of wax. When dry, a quick pass with a card scraper and the glue pops right off.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,477
    Johnson's Paste Wax. Glue never sticks. Let it dry and scrape it off.

    Charley

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Lent View Post
    Johnson's Paste Wax. Glue never sticks. Let it dry and scrape it off.
    Seems it would be easier just to use a piece of plastic, though, doesn't it?

  15. #15
    There is way too much plastic in the world already. If the appropriate amount of glue is applied there really isn't that much to remove.

    I generally use a 2" slick to knock any glue beads off my glueing bench.

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