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Thread: Chips under the chip breaker

  1. #16
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    Dec 2016
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    The chip breakers on my Clifton planes are very precisely machined flat at the correct angle. The flat face had microscopic lines in it. I thought I would polish it on a leather hone; big mistake! The tiny rounding of the leading edge was disastrous at collecting chips and my attempt to flatten it on a stone did not go well, I had to replace it!
    I have improved Stanley chip breakers successfully in the past with the stone on a glass plate and supporting the rear of the chip breaker on a Teflon block creating the correct angle, then sliding back and forth.
    The Clifton level of machining is something else again.
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  2. #17
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    May 2019
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    White Lake, Michigan
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    Great tip. It's analogous to a machinist flattening a machine way or a surface using a carbide scraper. Very effective and about as low-tech as you can go.

  3. #18
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    Mar 2019
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    Greeley, CO
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    Perhaps this is like a fart in Church but I really like the chip breakers that accompany Hock and IBC blades. The "extra" thick IBC set matches my post WWII Norris infill set.

  4. #19
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    Apr 2015
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    New England area
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    The mating edge of your chip-breaker is no different than the edge of a board, you have to remove the high spots.

  5. #20
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    Nov 2016
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    Itapevi, SP - Brazil
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    How to Fix Chipbreaker Clog on a Hand Plane Iron

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    I have a Stanley Baily #3 plane that I was using today to true up the edge of some hickory boards today. The first cut or two went pretty well, but then I had a problem with the plane chattering and not wanting to cut. I noticed chips hanging up in the mouth of the plane. When I took it apart, I noticed that some of the chips were packed under the chip breaker but only on one side of the blade. When I removed the chip breaker from the blade there were chips under the right side of the chip breaker, but none under the left half.

    What needs to be don to stop the chips from getting under the chip breaker?
    I think the following youtube movie can help you: link.

    You can also see this link as it is basically same contents but including the reference for the famous Japanese video on the effects of chip breaker on the plane cuts.

    Last edited by Osvaldo Cristo; 05-21-2019 at 8:03 PM.
    All the best.

    Osvaldo.

  6. #21
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    Mar 2004
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    DuBois, PA
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    1,636
    David Charlesworth, in one of his books, shows an easy to follow method of tuning the chipbreaker, on a stone.
    If the thunder don't get you, the lightning will.

  7. #22
    I'm still surprised that no publication I have seen has ever mentioned using the corner of the stone to hollow the underside slightly.
    I found the mating job needs to be done a lot better if using the cap iron/chipbreaker to eliminate tearout.

    Previously whilst just having the cap iron/CB set to what I had thought was a close setting whilst planing...
    there was no light showing between mating double irons, never had any issues until I learned how to set the double iron properly
    and that it became apparent how much never seen before dust can get trapped between them.

    Tom

  8. #23
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    Apr 2015
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    New England area
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    So if I understand correctly, I should twist half of the chip breaker so that it touches on the gap side of the blade? I have a metal working vise, where I am still not clear is just where I want to clamp the chip breaker to do the bending. Do I clamp on the flat just behind the curved front area? Or do I try to clamp on the curved area?

    Once I get it straightened out would I then hone the leading edge to get a perfect fit against the blade?

    This is a pretty nice condition plane and I don't want to mess it up.
    Set it on a flat surface to see if it's twisted and by how much. If it's all honked up, I'd buy a replacement rather than beating and twisting on it, but the steel is bendable/malleable so it can be fixed. It all depends on how you want to spend your time. The craft itself is hard enough to learn without all the ancillary time-wasters like defective equipment. There's certainly no shame in wanting to get on with working wood rather than fixing and/or restoring abused and neglected tools. A twisted cap iron would have been a reject at the factory. One either got through all those years ago, or some idiot in the chain of ownership messed it up.
    Last edited by Charles Guest; Yesterday at 11:17 AM.

  9. #24
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    Glad I don't pay you people by the hour to fix a plane up......"Hours of drudgery"? Not sure what people are doing that takes so dang long......it takes me one afternoon to rehab a plane....from a pile of rust to a WORKING plane...usually bring a plane home from a Rust Hunt about..noonish....by supper time, it is clean, sharpened, and tuned up, and doing work. Then again..I do not work for a "timeclock"....I just need to get it done, so the next item can be worked on.

    Have seen irons put in ( and used) with the bevel up...under the chipbreaker. Have seen irons with a wavy edge, and reverse camber. Have seen chipbreakers bent by someone using a screwdriver to pry the thing off the iron (didn't work, did it?) Lever caps placed upside down....Missing depth adjuster wheels, or, if they are there, they are on backwards, and not attached to the yoke. Sewing spools for the front knobs, square headed bolts( hard on the hand,ain't it) to attach the rear handle. estimate is about 500+ planes that I have rehabbed over the years.....and resold most of them. I kept the ones I liked best....

    Have developed a way to rehab a plane over the years....as I used to have several waiting in line....That is quick, no messing around, and gets very good results. Time-wasters? More likely the one doing the "rehab" is the culprit.

    IF I had the spare $25....there is a Craftsman No.4 sized plane downtown.....that I could have making shavings..in about 4 hours...if that.

    used to call such "Time-wasters" when I worked as a Carpenter...Milkman.....because they milked a 1 hour job out to an 8 hour job....and worked harder getting out of work, than just doing the job would have been...."3 days to install a bathroom vanity (no plumbing involved,either), with a helper?"
    Last edited by steven c newman; Yesterday at 7:43 PM.

  10. #25
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    Mar 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Glad I don't you people by the hour to fix a plane up......"Hours of drudgery"? Not sure what people are doing that takes so dang long......it takes me one afternoon to rehab a plane....from a pile of rust to a WORKING plane...usually bring a plane home from a Rust Hunt about..noonish....by supper time, it is clean, sharpened, and tuned up, and doing work. Then again..I do not work for a "timeclock"....I just need to get it done, so the next item can be worked on.

    have seen irons put in ( and used) with the bevel up...under the chipbreaker. Have seen irons with a wavy edge, and reverse camber. Have seen chipbreakers bent by someone using a screwdriver to pry the thing off the iron (didn't work, did it?) Lever caps placed upside down....Missing depth adjuster wheels, or, if they are there, they are backwards, and not attached to the yoke. Sewing spools for the front knobs, square headed bolts( hard on the hand,ain't it) to attach the rear handle. estimate is about 500+ planes that I have rehabbed over the years.....and resold most of them. I kept the ones I liked best....

    Have developed a way to rehab a plane over the years....as I used to have several waiting in line....That is quick, no messing around, and gets very good results. Time-wasters? More likely the one doing the "rehab" is the culprit.

    IF I had the spare $25....there is a Craftsman No.4 sized plane downtown.....that I could have making shavings..in about 4 hours...if that.

    used to call such "Time-wasters" when I worked as a Carpenter...Milkman.....because they milked a 1 hour job out to an 8 hour job....and worked harder getting out of work, than just doing the job would have been...."3 days to install a bathroom vanity (no plumbing involved,either), with a helper?"
    Ya said a mouthful here Steve! The past few days I've been tinkering with different scrapers/thicknesses. Now, I've been using card scrapers for many years, and over the past few days, I recall seeing some fancy red colored jig for prepping a card scraper, along with the text of saying how you can shorten that time. Anyhow, I decided to time myself on prepping a card scraper: under five minutes, for two edges, including filing, stoning, turning first burr and then rolling the burr. Nice curlies and no jig used or needed. Granted, I've been doing this for a while, but sometimes we just need to learn to hold our tongue just right and not to overthink or complicate things.
    If the thunder don't get you, the lightning will.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    New England area
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Zaffuto View Post
    Ya said a mouthful here Steve! The past few days I've been tinkering with different scrapers/thicknesses. Now, I've been using card scrapers for many years, and over the past few days, I recall seeing some fancy red colored jig for prepping a card scraper, along with the text of saying how you can shorten that time. Anyhow, I decided to time myself on prepping a card scraper: under five minutes, for two edges, including filing, stoning, turning first burr and then rolling the burr. Nice curlies and no jig used or needed. Granted, I've been doing this for a while, but sometimes we just need to learn to hold our tongue just right and not to overthink or complicate things.
    Every plane I own or have ever owned was used. Thankfully I've never had to spend more than five minutes on a cap iron and on probably half of them shouldn't have spent that much time, as they were basically fine. Doubt seriously if I'd bother with one that was a pretzel. I guess I'd better have my testosterone level checked.

  12. #27
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    Glad I don't you people by the hour to fix a plane up......"Hours of drudgery"? Not sure what people are doing that takes so dang long......it takes me one afternoon to rehab a plane....from a pile of rust to a WORKING plane...usually bring a plane home from a Rust Hunt about..noonish....by supper time, it is clean, sharpened, and tuned up, and doing work.
    +1 on what Steven said.

    My most recent plane rehab, a #60-1/2 likely from ~1923-1935, was likely less than two hours. Most of it was tinkering time while letting the oil soak in. Of course being a block plane it didn't have as many screws to clean or wooden handles to strip and sand. The sliding toe was stuck in place and there was a bit of rust to clean off of parts. The toe plate took less than two minutes getting stoned so it will slide smoother when adjusted. This is a step all of my fresh from the factory planes with an adjustable mouth have had done to them.

    There is still some rust in places. Possibly to be cleaned at a later time.

    Now the plane is making nice end grain shavings.

    Maybe take the camera out to the shop later to take pictures of another plane that just had to come home with me.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; Yesterday at 2:15 PM.
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #28
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    The camera was taken out to the shop and some pictures were taken. Instead of a hi-jack of this thread, a new thread was started for a couple of rust hunt finds.

    This post is to show one way of straightening a lever cap that is torsionally maladjusted:

    Torsional Adjustment of Cap Iron-chip breaker.jpg

    Since this was done in a woodworking vise a couple pieces of scrap were used to protect the vise jaws. Two more pieces of scrap were used to grip the end of the chip breaker to twist it by hand.

    When doing this be careful to not over twist or you will have the same problem on the other side. Do a little, test, repeat as needed.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; Yesterday at 6:24 PM.
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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