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Thread: Looking for high-quality entry door weatherstripping

  1. #1

    Looking for high-quality entry door weatherstripping

    I will be building 2 entry doors for our new house and I want them to seal as well as possible. The design will be a rail and stile design with 6/4 or 8/4 hard maple. I'll be installing Anderson storm doors for each door, and the doors will be protected by open porch overhangs, but we'll be building in West Yellowstone, so a good weather seal is a must.

    I'm looking for some kind of high-quality system like you see on Anderson French doors--something that fits into a groove on the door edges and bottom--not something that is glued on or tacked on. Something that will last 20 years.


    For those of you who have built exterior doors for cold climates, what have you used for a weather seal?


    Thanks a bunch.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
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    The stuff you're describing is generally called kerf-in weatherstrip. It does work well, and is easy to install or replace if you've designed the door for it. Google for manufacturers and retailers.

  3. #3
    The Orange and Blue borgs carry several varieties of kerf door seal. You will also need a thin slot cutter to make the slots.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 05-18-2019 at 8:00 AM.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    .. You will also need a thin slot cutter to make the slots...
    Not always true. I've put the slots along the door stop molding before I fasten the molding to the jamb. Then the slot is milled as a rabbet.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    Not always true. I've put the slots along the door stop molding before I fasten the molding to the jamb. Then the slot is milled as a rabbet.
    I've done that as well but it doesn't work for all situations.

  6. #6
    Kerf-in is good for sides and top. To me the weak link in the door seal chain is at threshold and where it meets side seals. Standard fare around here is adjustable "oak" threshold.
    After installing many doors in remodels, I chose to have one piece aluminum sill and silicone (not vinyl) seal on bottom of doors I built for our house. Makes way more sense if you're doing it all yourself. Much of what the industry sees as standard is there to accommodate ho-hum installations.

    These helpful folks can hook you up with that and more. I've linked page with bottom seal but worth it to peruse their whole catalog. If you want more detail or pics of install, just ask.

    http://conservationtechnology.com/bu...djustable.html

    For thresholds, these folks have it all, I think.

    https://www.assaabloydooraccessories...olds-pre-hung/

  7. #7
    Thanks everyone. This is exactly what I was looking for.

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