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Thread: Old Hardware Store Finally Throwing in the Towel

  1. #16
    Curt, I used to go there (Finkles) in the 90s and early ought years. I was wondering if that store still exists. I knew it was in Lambertville, but I couldnít remember the name of the store.

    There was also another hardware store further west in Pennsylvania. They still sold loose cut nails by the pound.

  2. #17
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    It didn't take much time to clean up the two old items found in the old hardware store. First was the string dispenser. It took a bit of rearrangement to clear a spot:

    String Dispenser.jpg

    The spoke pointer seemed to work fine as it was. That is not excuse to not clean it up and hone the blade. Learned a bit about the maker in the process:

    G.N. Stearns Spoke Pointer.jpg

    George N. Stearns developed health issues and his son, Edward C. Stearns took over the business in about 1877.

    It actually works quite well:

    Pointing a Spoke.jpg

    And the finished work:

    Pointed Spoke.jpg

    Now to work on making a spot for a drawer and a drawer to go in it.

    It has been tempting to go back and look under more piles of stuff. My resistance seems to be winning at the moment.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #18
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    I'd go back! For what it's worth. ;0)

  4. #19
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    Yes I too loved the old traditional hardware store.....You got exactly what you wanted, you could test it and you got usually good advice...I call that SERVICE and its generally sadly lacking in today's big box stores....Nearest i use now is the local ACE which comes close to that most of the time..My age is showing Jim. you did well.
    Jerry

  5. #20
    We had a very similar hardware store. Ernest and sons. It just closed last year and opened in 1905. They had a little bit of everything. From bandsaw blades to kitchen utensils. What I miss is all the old hardware they had. Stuff for windows and doors from the first half of the 1900s.

    I was in there a few years back and spotted a perfect condition Stanley 45 combination playing in a wooden box. It look like itís probably been there since it was originally ordered. I asked the gentleman that owned the store and ran it if it was for sale. He said 250 bucks and itís yours, to which I replied absolutely. Upon further reflection he decided to not sell it that day.

  6. #21
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    One Last Look

    In yesterday’s mail there was another letter from the folks at the old hardware store. My first thought was, “after all this time could there be anything left?” So it was put in the recycling without more thought.

    Had to go into town this morning. There is some roadwork underway, the road was down to one lane for a stretch. On the way home had to wait for the flagger and lead vehicle. My mind drifted and thought about the hardware store. It was going to be on my mind for the rest of my life if one last look wasn’t taken.

    There were only three or four other people looking around today. Most of the leftovers was plumbing and parts for other home repairs. There were a lot of large taps, large bolts, a few files and just random things from a long time ago hardware store. There were a lot of indicator type lights for automotive use, but they were for cars made before the 1970s. There was a box with replacement adjustable jaws for Crescent wrenches. There were some other hollow punches new in boxes, but they looked like they were for metal work or something else. All kinds of Little Fuses and fusible link material. Drawers of switch and plug plates. And a few items that seemed like they should come home with me:

    Found May 29, 2019.jpg

    Starting from the upper left is four turn switch sockets for C7 lamps. Next to that is a bunch of Bear marked India stones. The white stones are about as coarse as any other. They are without any trade mark. Below them is a Norton Abrasives coarse India stone. Bellow them is a dozen file handles and a half dozen long 1/4-20 bolts.

    To the right of all that is three different size hammer handles and six drill bits. There is also an old spoon bit above the plane blade. When checking out, the guy looking through my stuff asked where the heck were the plane blades. They were in the bottom of a drawer with a bunch of other stuff. He seemed to think they were special. He missed one, when we were dickering over the price, my final parry was, what can be left behind to knock off another $10. He took the other three plane blades.

    The gate handle will come in handy as will the tie down hooks. the little box with the taps in it got me excited when they were found and a forehead slap when looking a bit closer at home. My excitement was that they are 1/4-28. Stanley uses that pitch. The forehead slap was when a little sticker on the label was noticed with LH. Maybe someone somewhere needs a 1/4-28 LH tap. Below the taps is a punch for setting grommets some wedges, an old cast iron window latch and a brass drawer pull missing a ring. Going up there is an old roll of extra thick friction tape. A couple of leather punches and a drill stand that caused a bit of excitement at checkout. They were surprised there was a brand new one in the box still in the store. Below the drill stand box standing on end is a six pack of ~1/2” eye hooks. The end says HINDLEY Pic-Pak 15Ę. That had to come home with me. You can’t even get one of those eye hooks these days for 15Ę.

    Above the top of the Drillstand box is an old metal and wood ‘D’ handle for a shovel. Two long light gauge turnbuckles and three files finishes today's haul.

    Today my flashlight and an inspection mirror came along. The mirror makes it easier to see onto the higher shelves to see if anything has been shoved to the back. That is how the Drillstand and a couple other things were found.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 05-30-2019 at 2:19 PM. Reason: rewording for clarity, spelling & punctuation
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #22
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    Good you went back Jim....nothing like an old hardware store. AND you did well.

  8. #23
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    Something interesting was noticed today while trying to stow all the items brought home yesterday. The plane blade is 1-3/4" the size of a #3 & #5-1/4. It has its original factory grind and it is stamped VICTORY Made in U.S.A.

    Not sure if that is worth more than a regular Stanley blade, but it just might end up on ebay.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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