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Thread: Movable Grinder Stand

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    McDonough, GA (near Atlanta)
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    Movable Grinder Stand

    Our woodturning club is fortunate to be able to meet in the basement of a local church, but we need to move our equipment before and after each meeting. Has anyone purchased or built a grinder stand that can easily be moved? (Many of our members are in the age 60-80+ range.) Obviously, we want the portability without losing any of the stability. Pictures would be great. Thank you!

  2. #2
    I had my grinder on a cabinet i made out of 3/4 pine cabinet plywood that was maybe 20" wide x 18" deep and waist high. Just make sure you use double locking casters. I had 2 locking ones on the front and 2 that just swiveled on the back.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mellott View Post
    Our woodturning club is fortunate to be able to meet in the basement of a local church, but we need to move our equipment before and after each meeting. Has anyone purchased or built a grinder stand that can easily be moved? (Many of our members are in the age 60-80+ range.) Obviously, we want the portability without losing any of the stability. Pictures would be great. Thank you!
    Steve,

    I made one. I used a length of steel I-beam and welded steel plates to top and bottom. I made the bottom plate wider than the top for stability and bolted the grinder to the top plate. I've been using this for over 20 years with successive grinders, in wood shop, garage, and now in my little metal-working shop. It has always been quite stable. You have to be careful welding the bottom plate since the heat can warp even a 1/2" thick steel plate as the weld cools. If it does warp it will bend upwards on the outside and allow the thing to rock - in that case small feet could be welded to the bottom.

    I simply "walk" or slide mine across the concrete floor but it could be moved with a dolly, or better, with some retractable casters. Or some fixed casters mounted in the back that don't contact the floor until the whole thing is tilted backwards, perhaps by means of a "handle bar".

    I have another pedestal grinder someone else built that is also incredibly stable but at a cost of weight - it uses a 2" square steel tube welded to a steel plate on the floor. The steel plate is 1-1/2" thick and 14" square and HEAVY! It would definitely benefit from three foot-operated casters - one in the front and one on each side at the back corners. In fact, I think I'll do that - the thing must weigh 100 lbs.

    Edit: sorry, I don't have photos. Could measure if you might want to make one. The cabinet (with drawers) would have some strong advantages if you have the space.


    JKJ
    Last edited by John K Jordan; 05-11-2019 at 5:32 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
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    203
    I have one similar to this one on amazon and it works fine for me. Not the easiest to move around since it does not have casters but is fairly stable when sharpening tools.
    https://www.amazon.com/Delta-Power-T...57&s=hi&sr=1-4

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
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    368
    I use a tool cabinet. Works well for me. It's easy to move and can securely hold lots of tools, supplies, and other equipment. I actually am using what I think is called a pit cart with a shelf on the side. I doubt I could make something for what the cart cost me.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Greeley, CO
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    28
    I use the hated Harbor Freight grinder stand with a set of their 2" braked casters but I don't think it's stable enough for a wide range of users. I'd built a sturdy, stable base cabinet with casters to be safe.

    image_21076.jpg

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Palm Springs, CA
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    873
    I built a mobile cabinet many years ago. It has been surprisingly stable with four locking casters (of which I typically only need to lock two.) I have since upgraded the right side to a CBN wheel and a Robo-Rest not shown in the photos. That caused me to move the grinder forward in order to sharpen skews and sharp angled tools which in turn threw the center of gravity off. I remedied that by rotating the grinder so that it faces the rear of the cabinet and all is now well. Fortunately the grinder was mounted to a sub base that secures to the top with a couple carriage bolts and knobs, so relocation was easy.

    I previously had a three leg stand and it wasn't heavy duty enough or stable enough so this cabinet has been a big improvement. What I like about this arangement that I can move the grinder to where ever it best fits what I'm working on. Having the grinder only a few steps from the lathe makes it super convenient to do quick touch ups in process.

    Grinder Mobile Cabinet 3.jpg

    Grinder Mobile Cabinet 1.jpg
    Last edited by Dick Mahany; 05-13-2019 at 10:26 AM.
    Dick Mahany.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mellott View Post
    Our woodturning club is fortunate to be able to meet in the basement of a local church, but we need to move our equipment before and after each meeting. Has anyone purchased or built a grinder stand that can easily be moved? (Many of our members are in the age 60-80+ range.) Obviously, we want the portability without losing any of the stability. Pictures would be great. Thank you!
    If you want to consider something other than a stand, this is what I like best after trying several things: stainless steel tables on casters.

    Sharpening_small2.jpg

    They do require having enough space but they have some nice pluses:

    - The height is right - extremely important for sharpening, especially when sharpening by hand. It is recommend to have the grinding wheel about the same height of your lathe spindle. Some of the movements used for sharpening are similar for movements while turning.
    - Easy to roll around, sturdy when the wheels are locked.
    - There is enough space for several grinders. I use wheels from 80 grit to 1200 and one grinder would not be enough for me. (I have five grinders/Tormeks now on two of the tables.)
    - Large wire shelf below, adjustable height.
    - The stainless steel is easy to keep clean, especially nice if using a water wheel like the Tormek.
    - Nothing to build, just bolt together. I bought these at the local Sam's

    JKJ

  9. #9
    You might consider the Sorby belt sharpening system or Tormek which are light enough to be carried.
    Bill

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Kapolei Hawaii
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    2,900
    +1 Alex. I put my mini lathe on a rolling tool cabinet. Cheap. Picked it up for 110 bucks at sears. Will probably serve well as a grinder mount. Some more expensive ones actually lock, which may be of interest if you have to trust others. Lots of tools and things fit in that.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Elkhart, IN
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    253
    Quote Originally Posted by john k jordan View Post
    if you want to consider something other than a stand, this is what i like best after trying several things: Stainless steel tables on casters.

    Sharpening_small2.jpg

    jkj

    grinder envy!!!

  12. sorry if this has been suggested already. I have used this idea for a couple items. A stand with four legs for stability but two cross pieces down low that hold wheels out a few inches and barely off the ground. On the opposite side, cross pieces up higher that stick out like wheel barrow handles. Easy to move, mobile and when sitting is planted firmly on four legs. My father in law made a stand like that for one of his tools years ago. No rolling across the floor, no fussing with setting and releasing brakes., no casters, just two old lawn mower wheels about 5 or 6 inches in diameter.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    2,662
    Common method is a big truck wheel or a car wheel and tire with a pipe welded up the center instead of an axle. weld plate on top and bolt grinder there. Same idea for volleyball poles. Easy enough to roll a short distance. Some times the tire is filled with concrete.
    Bill D

  14. #14
    I'd argue that an off-the-shelf tool cart is the best way to go. Plenty of drawer storage and if needed you can encircle the sides with PVC tool holders.

    IMG_20170625_183801.jpg

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ricc Havens View Post
    grinder envy!!!
    Ha! You want maybe I send you a spare grinder? I've given away two in the last few years.

    Since that picture I've added another Tormek, bought used from Classifieds here. There is a fantastic Metabo in my little weld shop, a spare under the bench, and four angle grinders, probably used the most.

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