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Thread: First Table Saw- Delta 36-725 vs SawStop

  1. #1

    First Table Saw- Delta 36-725 vs SawStop

    I am looking to buy my first table saw and I am having a tough time making a decision. I was hoping you guys/gals could maybe give me some input. For a little background, I am pretty new to the hobby. I have done a lot of pretty simple shop projects, and a few fairly simple things for the house. I知 looking to dive a little deeper into the hobby, and would like to purchase a table saw. On one hand I want to buy the SawStop for the safety feature, higher quality saw, and the whole buy once cry once thing. On the other hand I think that maybe I should buy a cheaper saw to make sure I will use it enough to justify spending 3k on the SawStop. Then later on if I feel the need to upgrade I can sell the delta and buy what I want. What do you all think?

  2. #2
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    Something to consider is that if you go with a SawStop & then bail on the hobby, they tend to keep their value a lot better than the Delta would.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    Lancaster, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    Something to consider is that if you go with a SawStop & then bail on the hobby, they tend to keep their value a lot better than the Delta would.
    x2
    used Delta saws or any table saws don't seem to keep a high resale value around here, what few SawStops I have seen listed seem to move quick with a good resale price
    I started with a very cheap saw, fence moved even when clamped down if enough pressure was put against it. had to measure both ends of fence to set it. lack of power, blade actually moved sideways in a hard cut, etc Still made some furniture that I use today 35+ yrs later. Still have all of my fingers and thumbs. Upgraded to a Delta contractors saw, Jet contractor saw was not good quality back then. Finally moved up to a SawStop ICS with all available options at that time 5k+. Forrest rip blade, Forrest Dado set, etc
    Life is sure easier now
    Do what you can afford, Sawstop was not available when I started and a Unisaw was out of reach financially back then. However a bad cut would have been financially devastating back then also.

  4. #4
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    TX / LA border.. Toledo Bend
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    I can't imagine choosing that Delta that looks like it it came from the same factory that makes Transformers children's robot toys and Nike shoes and the bulk of Walmart products....

    When for the same $ one can buy a decent roughly 1940's to low 70's Unisaw or PM that actually has some steel in it.

    If the budget allows, and you feel more comfortably safer, then jump up to SS.

    Marc
    Last edited by Marc Jeske; 05-11-2019 at 4:31 PM.
    I'm pretty new here, not as as experienced as most. Please don't hesitate to correct me

  5. #5
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    Jul 2017
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    TX / LA border.. Toledo Bend
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    Jacob - A mid century made machine will all told last for generations, one reason is they are very readily repairable.

    Current consumer grade stuff as your Delta option is meant to be throwaway.

    Not necessarily, but WAY more than the older option.

    If you are interested in exploring this post nearest major city location.



    Marc
    I'm pretty new here, not as as experienced as most. Please don't hesitate to correct me

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Marquette MI
    Posts
    512
    My rule when buying wood working tools is always by the best that you can afford. In this case buy a Professional grade SawStop. You will not be sorry.

  7. #7
    I appreciate all the input. I was definitely leaning towards the Sawstop. Just seems a little weird to drop 3000 on something I知 not completely sure I知 going to use on a regular basis.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    For over 40 years, I repaired equipment professionally, electronic, electrical, cryogenic, hydraulic and mechanical. When I started woodworking and later built my shop, the last thing I wanted to do was rebuild used equipment for my hobby. But, that is me.

    If your budget will allow, I'd buy the Sawstop for the quality and obvious safety reasons. I agree the SS will hold it's value better in case resale becomes an issue.
    Ken

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Atwell View Post
    I appreciate all the input. I was definitely leaning towards the Sawstop. Just seems a little weird to drop 3000 on something I知 not completely sure I知 going to use on a regular basis.
    Maybe the way to think about is that it will allow you to keep using your fingers that I suspect you do use on a regular basis.

    For what it worth, I am thinking of replacing my old Ryobi BT3000 table saw with a Saw Stop.

    Bob

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Atwell View Post
    I appreciate all the input. I was definitely leaning towards the Sawstop. Just seems a little weird to drop 3000 on something I’m not completely sure I’m going to use on a regular basis.
    Look at the grizzly GO771Z. Looks like a much more substantial saw than that delta and it’ll be in the range of $1000 depending on your location. Don’t know what kind of reviews or what the general consensus is, but it’s a cabinet/hybrid type saw.

    Also, most people tend to reccomend the rigid contractor saw at HD over the delta at Lowe’s for that class of saw.

    I have been using a dewalt jobsite saw because I was in the same situation as you a couple years ago. I’m due for an upgrade soon, but don’t regret getting it to learn on and decide if I’m gonna buy a more expensive machine later.

  11. #11
    When i decided to replace my Skillsaw I looked at all the big brands and finally decided on the SS contractor saw. My decision was based the quality of the saw, but more importantly the safety. I decided the cost of the saw was less important that my fingers.

    My dad did major damage to two fingers a few years ago when he got complacent with his table saw.
    Last edited by Paul F Mills; 05-12-2019 at 8:04 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    A few years ago, the mere mention of SawStop often created heated discussions. That said, SawStop has been around long enough to have earned a solid reputation as a quality saw. I have owed one for over ten years, it is an excellent tool.

  13. #13
    The SawStop is a good saw, it can save your fingers, and it has a good (real) riving knife. Think of the additional cost as an insurance policy that you only pay once and if you ever sell it, you'll get a lot of your money back.

    I have a SawStop and it saved my thumb once.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Central MN
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    I just recently updated from a Rigid table saw to a 3hp Sawstop. The Rigid has performed flawlessly and I enjoyed using it for 4-5 years. Although now I am really enjoying the power, safety, and smoothness of the Sawstop.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Upland CA
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    Let me put it this way. My last ride in an ambulance was a couple years ago, ten miles, and cost $1800...not counting the ER, which was lots more. (not related to wood working).

    All better cabinet saws are within a few hundred dollars of the SawStop, and it is also a good saw. I am careful, I have all my fingers, but a bad hand injury would severely affect my life. Probably yours too. Talked to the wife about it, and she encouraged me to get it.

    Not trying to scare you, I got it for the same reason I quit riding motorcycles years ago. Accidents happen, I have a lot of people depending on me, and it is my way of trying to lessen the odds of a problem. Like Mike said...it's insurance.

    Full disclosure: Don't want to be a hypocrite. I kept my Unisaw, use it for dados and such, but 90% of table saw work is now done on SawStop. Thinking of letting the Uni go finally.
    Last edited by Rick Potter; 05-12-2019 at 2:45 AM.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

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