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Thread: Entry Lock Set that can't be picked

  1. #1
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    Entry Lock Set that can't be picked

    Ok, this sounds a little crazy but it's a real life situation that I'm trying to find a solution. I help with a few home repairs for an elderly widow lady. She calls me about 3-4 each times a year for things like toilet seat replacement, door repairs, gutter problems, etc. She called today and said she wanted a keyed lock that cannot be picked installed on her bedroom door. Her door has a Kwiki entry lockset that her 50 yo disabled son has learned how to pick. He enters her room and takes things when she is not home. I've met this son, he seems pretty shape, I'm guessing he has spent time on You Tube learning how to pick all the locks around the house. If he is that good, I can't think of any lockset that would defeat his skill. Hasp and padlock maybe but it would be on the ugly side. Any suggestions?
    Last edited by julian abram; 05-09-2019 at 10:00 AM.

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    I'm no longer in the security business, but one of the questions I asked in similar situations is will the cost of protection exceed the value of the assets? I don't recommend spending several hundred dollars on a pick resistant lockset to protect fifty dollars worth of assets.

    In several cases, I've seen covert entry attempts turn into forced entry successes when the person got tired of trying to bypass or pick the lock and smashed the door in. This resulted in more cost to the customer. If she has small valuables, a properly installed room safe might be a better solution than a new lockset. This might not be less expensive, but might be a better deterrent.

  4. #4
    I would think any regular entry lockset with a push button combination that she can change periodically would work. Or a key fob entry lockset. Schlage makes one.
    Lee Schierer
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  5. #5
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    50 year old son robbing his mom? My first thought was a police report.

    2nd thought is nanny cam to collect evidence for a police report.

    Since those are pretty obvious thoughts, I guess they have been rejected.

    First padlocks are (generally) as easy, or easier, to pick than door locks. Second, I think nothing is really pick-proof given enough time & expertise, but I bet some of the better smart key electronic locks require NSA level resources. Third, we had Schlage Primus locks recommended as the best locks with traditional keys when we remodeled. (It's been a while, but if anyone has surpassed them I'm sure they brag about it in their advertising.)

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Bassett View Post
    50 year old son robbing his mom? My first thought was a police report.

    2nd thought is nanny cam to collect evidence for a police report.
    3rd : Kick the thief out.

  7. #7
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    Julian,

    It doesn't sound crazy at all. As for pick-resistant locks, yes there are some that are very difficult to pick. You might consult with a locksmith.

    I like the idea of a camera watching the place as well, as long as she always remembers to turn it on every time she leaves and turn it on when she gets back. I have security cameras in and outside my shop I can view remotely through an internet connection. Things like a camera and new lock might give her peace of mind.

    I don't know the situation or the people, of course. Based on our own experience, is there any chance the elderly woman has the beginning of dementia? The reason I ask is as a relative very slowly developed Alzheimer's she went trough a long paranoia stage. She accused those taking care of her of trying to rob her. She reported people trying to get into her house when she was home, and getting into her house and taking things when she was gone. She had the locks changed multiple times. She got worse and worse and I had to take the firing pins out of a pistol after she was driving up and down the road to find and shoot the "thief". Thing is, there was never any sign of anyone getting into the house nor anything actually missing.

    This is probably not the case with this woman, but it might something to consider or watch for in the future.

    JKJ

    Quote Originally Posted by julian abram View Post
    Ok, this sounds a little crazy but it's a real life situation that I'm trying to find a solution. I help with a few home repairs for an elderly widow lady. She calls me about 3-4 each year for things like toilet seat replacement, door repairs, gutter problems, etc. She called today and said she wanted a keyed lock that cannot be picked installed on her bedroom door. Her door has a Kwiki entry lockset that her 50 yo disabled son has learned how to pick. He enters her room and takes things when she is not home. I've met this son, he seems pretty shape, I'm guessing he has spent time on You Tube learning how to pick all the locks around the house. If he is that good, I can't think of any lockset that would defeat his skill. Hasp and padlock maybe but it would be on the ugly side. Any suggestions?

  8. #8
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    You don't indicate what type disability (i.e wheelchair-bound), but could it be as simple as putting a cheap slide-bolt high enough 'outside' on her passage door that he can't reach it? Obviously, this has be within her reach limitations tho' - both now and in the foreseeable future.

    Maybe biometric lockset? I think most still have a keyed back-up, but haven't researched. >> Have a locksmith disable the key cylinder? Use only the fingerprint.

    A scatter-shot, but can he get outside? If not, then maybe a private, exterior entry for her w/ a slide-bolt on inside of her passage door?? She can lock the slide-bolt from inside her room, then enter and leave thru the private door. Expensive & impractical, but you asked ... so maybe its the seed of another idea.

    Finally, I don't know her age, but maybe Social Services to discuss a plan forward with her, as in she's not able to continue as primary caregiver for the son (::group home?). Brutal maybe, but it happens sooner or later.

    You also strike me as the type who will keep fire egress issues in mind. Good luck and thanks for the social conscience.
    Molann an obair an saor.

  9. #9
    There are many lineups starting from $50-$3000. Two of the simplest integrated togather are schlage keyless entry with a child magnetic cupboard door stop. This will run you about $250

    The simplest would be a latch with a Dudley locker lock.
    Last edited by Matt Mattingley; 05-09-2019 at 12:14 AM.

  10. #10
    Here's a Yale 'pick-proof' lock...amazing how easy it was to prove it ain't

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  11. #11
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    How about one of these locks with the square style keys
    FJM Security SPRS60-KD


    or an Abloy Protec II padlock
    Last edited by Greg Parrish; 05-09-2019 at 3:58 AM.

  12. #12
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    Disabilities come in many forms and many are not "physical"...I personally have an adult child who is considered disabled for other than physical reasons. And from time to time we have had to secure valuables, although that is no longer an issue with time passing.

    IMHO, the woman's request is legitimate since she is a caregiver for an adult who apparently cannot live independently and the solutions suggested seem to be helpful. I do agree with the idea that one has to determine cost of loss vs cost of protection. I like the idea of a non-key (numeric combination) lock with periodic code changes but I'd also supplement that with a properly installed small safe for "real valuables" if there are any of concern. (Jewelry and other higher valuables)
    --

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  13. #13
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    Fellows, thanks for all the good suggestions and thoughts. I installed many locksets while building houses in the old days but obviously there is lot of new lockset products I am unaware of. I didn't give many details about the lady and son in the OP but to better understand I'll share a few. The lady is 80 yo, a German lady that married a GI and came to the states I think in the 1960's. The husband died many years ago with one of those long lingering cancer deaths that sucked up all the savings. Since then she has supported herself and son cleaning houses, caring for elderly, running errands, etc. Do not think this lady has dementia because of her age, she is sharp as a tack, has boundless energy and always working for other people. Our country would be a better place if we had hard working citizens like this lady. Her son seems to be a pleasant fellow, smart, conversational but has mental/emotional issues, no physical limitations. The last time I was at her house, he was in the back yard working on a lawn mower. It started raining and he just went in the house leaving the disassemble mower, parts and tools there in the rain. Always fidgety, struggles to concentrate, similar to someone with extreme Attention Deficit. She complains to me about her son living there but I know she will never kick him out because of that family thing called love.
    Anyway she is gone from her home days and nights taking care of other folks, giving him a lot of unsupervised time. I don't think he actually steals valuables from her bedroom, I think it an issue she resents him going in and messing with her stuff when she is not home. I'm going to her house Saturday morning to install a dishwasher and will check out her door lock situation before suggesting a solution to her. Again thanks for all the good input.
    Last edited by julian abram; 05-09-2019 at 11:01 AM.

  14. #14
    We have a kid who just couldn't stand NOT breaking into our bedroom when we weren't around. He didn't pick the lock, he just used cards, knives, screwdrivers, anything to push open the latchbolt. When I got a good lock that prevented a card or knife from opening the latch, he just used a screwdriver to spread the door and jam far enough apart to open the door. To prevent that, I screwed a brass plate under the stop molding that covered the access to the latch, and for good measure I embedded about 2 dozen 1" finishing nails thru the stop molding...

    ... It worked, for a few minutes. He used a crowbar and pried all the stop molding off the jamb. I forget what exactly I did that actually prevented him from opening the door, couple of deadbolts and reinforcement plates I think it was. Didn't matter. He got on roof and broke a window to get in. Piece o' work he was back then...

    If someone wants in bad enough, it's hard to keep 'em out...
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kev Williams View Post
    We have a kid who just couldn't stand NOT breaking into our bedroom when we weren't around. He didn't pick the lock, he just used cards, knives, screwdrivers, anything to push open the latchbolt. When I got a good lock that prevented a card or knife from opening the latch, he just used a screwdriver to spread the door and jam far enough apart to open the door. To prevent that, I screwed a brass plate under the stop molding that covered the access to the latch, and for good measure I embedded about 2 dozen 1" finishing nails thru the stop molding...

    ... It worked, for a few minutes. He used a crowbar and pried all the stop molding off the jamb. I forget what exactly I did that actually prevented him from opening the door, couple of deadbolts and reinforcement plates I think it was. Didn't matter. He got on roof and broke a window to get in. Piece o' work he was back then...

    If someone wants in bad enough, it's hard to keep 'em out...
    Geez, he was a tenacious strong willed little fellar wasn't he.

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