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Thread: Oak for Curbs

  1. #1

    Oak for Curbs

    Has anyone ever used the oak that they use for curb lines in city streets? The guy doing the curbs told me they take it to the dump with any left over when they are done. Just curious if anyone has used this before? I am about to grab some if so.
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  2. #2
    You mean it's used for concrete forms? If there is no concrete on it and you have some use for it ;sure. I wouldn't take it
    just "because it's there". But I would re cycle the Bud can.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Tea View Post
    Has anyone ever used the oak that they use for curb lines in city streets? The guy doing the curbs told me they take it to the dump with any left over when they are done. Just curious if anyone has used this before? I am about to grab some if so.
    Looks like #2 Common at best, and loaded with grit from the road, concrete, etc. Probably the quality of pallet wood. That said, if you were to bandsaw the outer layer off, with a cheap blade, you might be able to get something usable out of it.
    Last edited by Doug Dawson; 05-08-2019 at 1:43 PM.

  4. #4
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    That would probably keep my house warm all winter.

  5. #5
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    Where in the world are you? I have seen redwood used for curbs. Other then that curbs are cast concrete, stone or brick in my world. I really have no idea what you are talking about?
    Bil l.
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 05-08-2019 at 3:24 PM.

  6. #6
    Our gas company uses it while they are digging large holes. The guy said when they are done it is mandatory that they throw it away. There is no concrete or debris on majority of it. Some of it was never even touched. There are some 10-12 pieces.

    I was just curious if anyone ever used it before I went loading it. Thanks!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Tea View Post
    Our gas company uses it while they are digging large holes. The guy said when they are done it is mandatory that they throw it away.
    Impregnated with the gas? Sounds interesting. Does it light easily? Red oak is very porous, so the gas might be inside of it as well. No wonder they feel the need to throw it away. Kingsford EZLight substitute, maybe. Is this in California, by any chance?

  8. #8
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    I have seen high pressure gas pipe shipped by railcar with oak 10x10 blocking. Natural gas will not be in the air to saturate wood. Maybe he means gasoline?
    Location might help figure language may be British English?
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 05-09-2019 at 12:26 AM.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I have seen high pressure gas pipe shipped by railcar with oak 10x10 blocking. Natural will not be in the air to saturate wood. Maybe he means gasoline?
    Location might help figure language may be Briiush English?
    There was/is a community in Central Texas that had to be evacuated for a month or so because natural gas had infiltrated the soil around a leak, it was around ten square blocks or so. You might then believe that porous wood _immediately_ surrounding a gas repair or leak event could similarly be at risk. This was quite recent. Other areas might be even more persnickety.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    There was/is a community in Central Texas that had to be evacuated for a month or so because natural gas had infiltrated the soil around a leak, it was around ten square blocks or so. You might then believe that porous wood _immediately_ surrounding a gas repair or leak event could similarly be at risk. This was quite recent. Other areas might be even more persnickety.
    I believe that was gas injection to store gas from other parts of he country. I thought it was in Malibu, California. Turns out the seal on top of the gas level was cracked or porous. It might have been fracking that was done but not deep enough.Bill D.

    on edit:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aliso_Canyon_gas_leak
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 05-09-2019 at 12:33 AM.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I believe that was gas injection to store gas from other parts of he country. I thought it was in Malibu, California. Turns out the seal on top of the gas level was cracked or porous. It might have been fracking that was done but not deep enough.Bill D.

    on edit:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aliso_Canyon_gas_leak
    No, that was a feeder gas line through Georgetown Texas that I was referring to, lateral and just below ground, probably close to the same type of line that was the subject of the OP's gas company work. It was last month. I think the last evacuees might just be returning to their work or homes right about now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Tea View Post
    Our gas company uses it while they are digging large holes. The guy said when they are done it is mandatory that they throw it away. There is no concrete or debris on majority of it. Some of it was never even touched. There are some 10-12” pieces.

    I was just curious if anyone ever used it before I went loading it. Thanks!
    Still curious as to why they have to throw that wood away. Is it being used for shoring?

  13. #13
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    It may be that in his country they have wood disease or insects and quarantine wood. Once it enters into a contaminated zone no wood is allowed out of that county or maybe even his entire country is quarantined. They have done that in my area for fruit flys and what not.
    Bill D

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    I would not turn my nose up at this material. My son-in-law is a carpenter building bridges, and he gives me as much 3 x 10 lagging material as I want. Most is oak, but I've also gotten the odd piece of walnut, elm, hickory and cherry from him. Yes, it needs to be cleaned with a wire brush, and gone over with a metal detector, but once you start band sawing it you can find all sorts of great looking stuff. Or you find junk. Here are some pieces I've made from his lagging.
    _MG_3593.jpg20170623_203558.jpg20171224_111206.jpg20180302_080214.jpg_MG_3349.jpgpotty.jpg

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    Still curious as to why they have to throw that wood away. Is it being used for shoring?
    Most likely the wood is charged to the job. If it was saved to be used on another job, the accounting would be a nightmare and the charges of fraud would be plentiful.

    There is a lot of waste due to "legal requirements" involved in doing business.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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