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Thread: I took the pocket change...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    I took the pocket change...

    that I put on my dresser every night and collect in a baggie to a Coinstar machine and it was thirty dollars.
    It is at a local Walmart store.

  2. #2
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    It has been a long time for me since the days my change was saved in a jar.

    Most of the time any change is carried with me to be able to make the exact change when making a cash transaction.

    Though cash transactions are becoming fewer and farther between.

    Recently when we were setting up at a flea market we bought a roll each of nickels, dimes and quarters. We didn't use many of them. Even most of the pennies we dug up around the house stayed in my pocket. Two beat up pennies were taken along for fun to give to children accompanying adults. One was from the 1930s. The other was an 1851 large cent that looked like it was run over by a fleet of logging trucks. Alas, there were very few kids and no opportunity to foist the funny pennies off on a curious youngster.

    jtk
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    It has been a long time for me since the days my change was saved in a jar.

    Most of the time any change is carried with me to be able to make the exact change when making a cash transaction.

    Though cash transactions are becoming fewer and farther between.

    Recently when we were setting up at a flea market we bought a roll each of nickels, dimes and quarters. We didn't use many of them. Even most of the pennies we dug up around the house stayed in my pocket. Two beat up pennies were taken along for fun to give to children accompanying adults. One was from the 1930s. The other was an 1851 large cent that looked like it was run over by a fleet of logging trucks. Alas, there were very few kids and no opportunity to foist the funny pennies off on a curious youngster.

    jtk
    I carry change as well to get rid of it. Not so much to give the exact amount but to minimize what coins I get back. Usually to avoid more pennies. I find it often confounds the cashier. Counting change is a lost and unnecessary skill. Thank heavens for smart registers.
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  4. #4
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    Any coins in my pocket at bed time go into a jar on my dresser. When it's full, I cash it in and take LOML out for a nice dinner. A full jar is usually a little over $100. It takes longer to get it filled up in recent years - I always carry cash in my pocket, but I just don't use it that often any more.

    A guy ahead of me in line at Kroger yesterday wrote a check! I see that about twice a year these days.

  5. #5
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    Change?! Oh, the stuff left over when you pay cash for something, right? I haven't seen any of that in years; must be a western thing.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Ragatz View Post
    Any coins in my pocket at bed time go into a jar on my dresser. When it's full, I cash it in and take LOML out for a nice dinner. A full jar is usually a little over $100. It takes longer to get it filled up in recent years - I always carry cash in my pocket, but I just don't use it that often any more.
    My LOML and I have a mason jar on the dresser for our date night too. We average around $100 when it's full. It's been good incentive to pay with cash more often.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Weber View Post
    I carry change as well to get rid of it. Not so much to give the exact amount but to minimize what coins I get back. Usually to avoid more pennies. I find it often confounds the cashier. Counting change is a lost and unnecessary skill. Thank heavens for smart registers.
    yea smart registers kids still can't get the change right. I always check the change they give back half the time its wrong
    y
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  8. #8
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    I have a cookie tin that I started keeping change in a few years ago. I rarely have any REAL money anymore because of debit cards. Well, what change I did keep was given to my Grandkid's when they wanted a snack or such at school. One day they came and asked me if they could take some change to church for a mission project where the boys and girls were having a contest to see who could raise more money. I thought there was only $15-$20 in there so I said sure. I told them to divide it equally between them to make it fair. Lo and behold, there was well over $100 in there. I had to keep my promise.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    that I put on my dresser every night and collect in a baggie to a Coinstar machine and it was thirty dollars.
    It is at a local Walmart store.
    Lowell, did they charge you a fee or a percentage to use this?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Shenandoah Valley in Virginia
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    Took a coffee can of change to bank where I had to use a machine to count it... seemed kinda low on amount...
    Since I had 13 other coffee cans at home of change... I counted out $40 worth of change, all pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters..
    Exactly $40... went back to bank and ran it thru the machine and it came out just over $33 ... difference of over $6.. about 20%

    Machines at bank really short changed me... do not know about machines at Walmart... did not check them..

  11. #11
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    There was a nominal fee, just a dollar or two.

  12. #12
    Our credit union doesn't charge a fee. One day about a year ago, and there was a couple with two peck buckets of change at the "Coin Star" machine. Commented to the teller, and she said it was their fourth trip that day. In the Senior Sunday School classes at church, we collect change to send to Baptist Homes to help seniors pay for their prescriptions. In our church alone, during the past year, we have sent in over $750.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    Central IL
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    Change goes into a jar to help pay for odd purchases, cashed in at over $400 last time I cashed in, prior to that cashed in over $620 to pay for a DJ for son's wedding reception. Takes 2-3 years to get that much. I do not use change from pocket as I like to save it all

  14. #14
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    Dec 2005
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    But if you use one at a grocery store you can often pick to get youíre money in the form of store credit and there isnít a fee.

    This is a classic lowell thread.

  15. #15
    Here in Canada change adds up really fast if you are a cash person. Our smallest bill is a 5. A few years ago we got rid of the penny. About 25 years ago we got rid of the two dollar bill and replaced it with a two dollar coin. And about 30 years ago we replaced the one dollar bill with a coin

    But Canada is one of the most cashless society’s in the world. Are Bank debit cards have a proximity tap chip up to $100. Over $100 you have to insert your card reading a special chip or swipe it and then punch and a key PIN.

    When my daughter was born I built her a Rockinghorse and hollowed out the belly (about 1 1/2 gallons capacity). Anytime I get the two dollar coin I drop it in her horse. My daughter is special needs in a wheelchair. One day she might cash it in for a new wheelchair or something...



    All other coins I have a drop in coin separator and I just roll it up and donate it to a special needs kids charity.

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