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Thread: Building Fence for Table Saw

  1. #1
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    Building Fence for Table Saw

    So I've come across a few different designs for a better table saw for a crappy job site saw.

    http://woodarchivist.com/3585-diy-table-saw-fence/

    I like that this one isn't welded. It allows for some adjustment if it moves over time. The problem is I am not familiar with the peened over pins and I can't seem to find much help online about the process.

    However. I also found this, which seems to be much more popular.

    http://www.twistedknotwoodshop.com/P...quarefence.pdf

    However, this one requires welding, which I am not familiar with, nor do I have the tools for it. All I have is soldering equipment. If I have start buying equipment, then it becomes too expensive and I'm putting too much money into a crappy table saw. I was looking at it, but I don't think I can make it where I can use screws and the screws won't interfere with the track.

    Has anyone made any modifications to either one to make them easier to make? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Sergio Sotolongo View Post
    I like that this one isn't welded. It allows for some adjustment if it moves over time. The problem is I am not familiar with the peened over pins and I can't seem to find much help online about the process.
    Peening is something typically done with rivets. A Rivet is placed in a hole and a washer is put on the straight end of the rivet. The head of the rivet is placed on something like an anvil to support and hold it. The other end of the rivet is hammered to mushroom the end of the rivet to tighten it up against the washer. It's something that's been done in things like farming equipment, metal ships and bridges before welding was available. In fact it's still done in many industries today in certain situations where welding is not desired as the part may need to be removed some time in the future. One example you likely can find is automobile and truck frames crossmembers though most don't use a washer due to precision drilling and sizing of holes.

  3. #3
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    I like the first one, looks easy to make.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Haus View Post
    Peening is something typically done with rivets. A Rivet is placed in a hole and a washer is put on the straight end of the rivet. The head of the rivet is placed on something like an anvil to support and hold it. The other end of the rivet is hammered to mushroom the end of the rivet to tighten it up against the washer. It's something that's been done in things like farming equipment, metal ships and bridges before welding was available. In fact it's still done in many industries today in certain situations where welding is not desired as the part may need to be removed some time in the future. One example you likely can find is automobile and truck frames crossmembers though most don't use a washer due to precision drilling and sizing of holes.
    Thank you. Now, I couldn't find any threaded rods with the hole for the pin. I take it, that I will have to do myself as well as the hole to insert the rivet?

  5. #5
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    Hi Sergio,
    It will be easier to drill the cross-hole in the threaded rod if you first file a small flat on the side of the threaded rod where you intend to start the drill. I would file the flat, center punch to mark the location, drill with small center drill or 1/8" drill bit, then proceed to the size you require for the cotter pin. This would be easier to do using a drill press and holding the threaded rod in a drill press vise. Otherwise - you could use a hand drill (electric drill) to accomplish the same result. It isn't critical that the hole be exactly centered for this application. By the way, it is easier to keep the drill centered on the punch mark if you use a 135 degree split-point drill bit. I have several sets of the Milwaukee brand and they are excellent for this type of situation. I purchased my Milwaukee drill bit sets at Home Depot. Home Depot also sells these bits individually in case you only need 1 or 2 sizes.
    David

    https://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-48-...=fsclp_pl_dp_4

    Milwaukee drill bit set.jpg

  6. #6
    If you'd like a slightly simpler method how to drill a hole through a bolt or threaded rod for something like a cotter key etc. here's what I have done several time. Take the threaded rod and thread 2 nuts on it, spaced apart or just 1 nut if a bolt. Place the nut where you want the hole, mark across the face of the nut and center punch it. Clamp it down on the drill press table, use cutting oil and drill through the nut and threaded rod using a good quality drill bit. Depending on the size of hole you need, you can start small (say 1/8") and step up to the size you ultimately want. I had about 20 bolts I needed to drill for cotter keys when I rebuilt the IRS in my car and that's what I did and it worked out great. I'm talking grade 8 bolts and using a good bit and cutting oil I drilled them all successfully.
    Hope that helps.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Haus View Post
    If you'd like a slightly simpler method how to drill a hole through a bolt or threaded rod for something like a cotter key etc. here's what I have done several time. Take the threaded rod and thread 2 nuts on it, spaced apart or just 1 nut if a bolt. Place the nut where you want the hole, mark across the face of the nut and center punch it. Clamp it down on the drill press table, use cutting oil and drill through the nut and threaded rod using a good quality drill bit. Depending on the size of hole you need, you can start small (say 1/8") and step up to the size you ultimately want. I had about 20 bolts I needed to drill for cotter keys when I rebuilt the IRS in my car and that's what I did and it worked out great. I'm talking grade 8 bolts and using a good bit and cutting oil I drilled them all successfully.
    Hope that helps.
    Paul,
    That is a great idea! Much easier than filing a flat. Why didn't I think of that! If you were drilling Grade 8 bolts (not Grade 5 or metric), then I would expect that you went thru quite a few drill bits or maybe did some resharpening.
    David

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    Paul,
    That is a great idea! Much easier than filing a flat. Why didn't I think of that! If you were drilling Grade 8 bolts (not Grade 5 or metric), then I would expect that you went thru quite a few drill bits or maybe did some resharpening.
    David
    Dave

    Actually I used a single bit to drill them all. IIRC it's one of the high priced titanium coated bits, around 1/8" diameter. Happens the drill press I usually set at 480 rpms when drilling metal, and that's what I used IIRC. I use a lot of 3 in 1 Oil or cutting oil and clean the waste off the drillbit a number of times while drilling. I keep pressure on the bit enough to keep it drilling but not so much as to force the bit. One nice thing is when you screw off the nut it cleans up the hole from the interaction with the nut. One nice thing is the hole in the nut acts a drill guide so the bit won't wander while drilling as long as you line it up correctly at the start.

    Paul

  9. #9
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    Paul,
    That's great to hear! Even though the OP only needs to drill a single hole (hopefully) - I was thinking the same thing about the nut. Once you drill the first hole - you can use it as a guide for the remaining bolts. Buy the way - what make, model, and year car did you redo the rearend on? I have done quite a bit of work on some of the older cars, and this brings back memories of some of the old XKE's I used to own (and work on).
    David

  10. #10
    Dave

    It's an 86 Corvette convertible, 350 with a Tremec 5 speed I'm renovating (I didn't say restoring). It needed new suspension bushing in it and rather than just replacing the old ones with new, I upgraded to the Banski Suspension Kit. Instead of bushings it uses heim joints in their place. I happen to like driving those curvy backroads and for that it's perfect. It tightens up the suspension and gives you great handling characteristics.
    Here's a partial picture of the replacements (disregard the arrow) and you should be able to see some of the cotter keys I drilled the bolts for.

    Paul
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Haus View Post
    If you'd like a slightly simpler method how to drill a hole through a bolt or threaded rod for something like a cotter key etc. here's what I have done several time. Take the threaded rod and thread 2 nuts on it, spaced apart or just 1 nut if a bolt. Place the nut where you want the hole, mark across the face of the nut and center punch it. Clamp it down on the drill press table, use cutting oil and drill through the nut and threaded rod using a good quality drill bit. Depending on the size of hole you need, you can start small (say 1/8") and step up to the size you ultimately want. I had about 20 bolts I needed to drill for cotter keys when I rebuilt the IRS in my car and that's what I did and it worked out great. I'm talking grade 8 bolts and using a good bit and cutting oil I drilled them all successfully.
    Hope that helps.
    Sounds like a better idea. Thanks.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Haus View Post
    Dave

    It's an 86 Corvette convertible, 350 with a Tremec 5 speed I'm renovating (I didn't say restoring). It needed new suspension bushing in it and rather than just replacing the old ones with new, I upgraded to the Banski Suspension Kit. Instead of bushings it uses heim joints in their place. I happen to like driving those curvy backroads and for that it's perfect. It tightens up the suspension and gives you great handling characteristics.
    Here's a partial picture of the replacements (disregard the arrow) and you should be able to see some of the cotter keys I drilled the bolts for.

    Paul
    Hi Paul,
    That looks like a nice setup. Here's a couple shots of my 74 Porsche 914 - which also has IRS. Chevy 350, 5 speed transaxle, weighs around 2450 lbs, around 400 HP. It also likes driving those curvy and winding roads. It is a mid-engine layout.
    David

    1974 Porsche 914 V8.jpg Porsche 914 V8 IRS.jpg

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    Hi Paul,
    That looks like a nice setup. Here's a couple shots of my 74 Porsche 914 - which also has IRS. Chevy 350, 5 speed transaxle, weighs around 2450 lbs, around 400 HP. It also likes driving those curvy and winding roads. It is a mid-engine layout.
    David

    1974 Porsche 914 V8.jpg Porsche 914 V8 IRS.jpg
    It's funny, I can't see a single attachment on this forum. Every time I try to view one it says I don't have rights - oh well such is life.
    I'm sure your Porsche is special. Everyone's cars is IMO.

    On the using a nut, that was something Dad taught me when I was a kid. Our drill press was a hand operated one, you cranked it and there was a flywheel on it and a ratcheting paw that lowered the bit as it turned. You needed something very rigid while you cranked the thing to drill through whatever you were working on.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Haus View Post
    It's funny, I can't see a single attachment on this forum. Every time I try to view one it says I don't have rights - oh well such is life.
    I'm sure your Porsche is special. .
    That's because you need to be a contributor, which costs $6 per year.................Regards, Rod.

  15. If you want to avoid welding, how about a wooden one? I've built this one from John Heisz of I Build It for a couple of saws, and it works great. Easy to build.

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