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Thread: Sliding table for a cabinet saw.

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
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    6,271
    Marshall, the frugal approach is to build a crosscut sled. I have one that can handle parts up to about 44" wide by whatever length you want (with outrigger support). Plus you have a built in ZCI. And it doesn't add to the footprint of your TS, though you have to find a place to put it when it's not being used.

    John

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    519
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    .

    The crosscut wing only did just that - crosscuts. It could not rip. The wing was also quite some distance from the blade - at least 10" - and this would have made ripping of narrow pieces impossible, even if they could somehow be held in position. By contrast, the K3 slider is about 1/2" from the blade ...

    The crosscut table is very useful as an upgrade to a traditional tablesaw, but it will not turn it into a slider.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Derek,

    Thanks for your photos.

    I use my sliding table attachment in conjunction with a home built fixture to do ripping. In my current configuration - I am limited to slightly over 36". If I reposition the sliding attachment to the stock mounting location, then I can rip to 48". This fixture allows for the work piece to be clamped very close to the blade, and the fixture provides the equivalent of a zero clearance insert as well. Since this is "just a hobby" for me, I am very happy with my current setup. If I was in it professionally, then I would certainly consider spending the 20-40K or more cost for one of the top quality large format fully equipped real sliders.

    David

    Ripping with Sliding Attachment 1.jpg Ripping with Sliding Attachment 2.jpg Ripping with Sliding Attachment 3.jpg Ripping with Sliding Attachment 4.jpg Ripping with Sliding Attachment 5.jpg Ripping Fixture bottom view.jpg

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    519
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    Marshall

    Yes! adding a dedicated cross cut slider is worth it. I've had the JessEm Mast-R-Slide on my table saw for many years now and just would not want to be without it. It brings a level of repeatability, and functional accuracy, that is well worth the cost. ( It was over $500.00 ten or 12 years ago.) Every now and then one comes up used, but they go quick!
    It's not just an addition for panels. I promise you that you will use it every time you use your table saw. For every cross cut you make. I haven't had a miter on my table saw since it went on.
    Be warned, they are a little bit finicky to get set up the first time. An extra pair of hands will definitely be useful. But once setup, it's nice.
    There is a trick to getting one setup for square using a dial indicator. It only takes a few minutes, but you end up with dead on, no worries, 90 degree cross cuts. Every time!
    Hi Mike,
    I agree completely! What a joy to use, plus it adds a great degree of safety by keeping the hands away from the saw blade. To date, I have been setting my miter fence to 90 degrees using a machined insert for the miter slot along with a large framing square (see photo 1). I thought about your comment on using the dial indicator - so I thought I'd try that approach to see how accurate my original method is. I used a large precision ground fixturing block banked against the miter fence and mounted the dial indicator to the table saw surface. The result is that I am measuring around 0.005" to 0.006" per foot of slider travel. So for my current setup with 36" length of cut, this would give me around 0.015" to 0.018" of taper over the 36" cut distance. This is not bad for most applications, but it is easy enough to go ahead with the final adjustment and "dial it in" for the best accuracy. I would be interested to see photos of your dial indicator setup - perhaps you have an easier method.
    Thanks,
    David

    Setting Slider Miter Fence with Dial Indicator 1.jpg Setting Slider Miter Fence with Dial Indicator 2.jpg Setting Slider Miter Fence with Dial Indicator 3.jpg Setting Slider Miter Fence with Dial Indicator 4.jpg Setting Slider Miter Fence with Dial Indicator 5.jpg Setting Slider Miter Fence with Dial Indicator 6.jpg

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Marshall Harrison View Post
    Doesn't seem like there are any better ways for ripping other than maybe adding a feeder.
    You could do what I do - never ever rip hardwood on a table saw, that's what a bandsaw is for. Almost all my wood preparation happens at the bandsaw and jointer/planer. The only uses for the table saw in my shop are for precise crosscutting, usually on a sled, cutting sheet goods, dadoes/grooves, and maybe a few jigs for special purposes.

    After jointing one edge, I run the workpiece through the planer upright on the jointed edge to bring it to final dimension, both long edges parallel. I was told this method of working is common in Europe. Once I tried it I never looked back. Just another option.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    519
    Hi Edwin,
    Say you are planing a long board that is 6 inches wide and 1 inch thick. How do you support the board in the vertical position as you pass it thru the planer to bring it to final dimension? Do you use a special holding fixture? If you use a special fixture, could you show a photo please?
    Thanks,
    David

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    866
    I also have the jessem slider which I love. Its for cross cutting only and replaces a sled and a miter gauge. I still use my miter gauge for angled cuts. Cutting 8 inches off the rail never bothered me, and I use the left extension to the right of the blade.

  7. #22
    I have had the Laguna sliding table on one of my Unisaws for decades. It is extremely rarely used now that I have a Festool track saw.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    Hi Edwin,
    Say you are planing a long board that is 6 inches wide and 1 inch thick. How do you support the board in the vertical position as you pass it thru the planer to bring it to final dimension? Do you use a special holding fixture? If you use a special fixture, could you show a photo please?
    Thanks,
    David
    Hi David,

    No holding fixture. I just carefully make sure the edge is registered to the planer infeed bed flat, pushing from the top edge with my thumb and feeling it. The rollers grab it and feed the board through. I have done this frequently with boards as thin as 1/2" (in fact, did so last evening). I think I've gone down to 3/8" a few times also. I have never had a misfeed or had the board topple over for some reason. Of course the bottom edge is the one that has been jointed. I am using a Hammer A3-31 with a spiral cutterhead but I don't know that it should make a difference as long as the planer feed rollers are in proper adjustment. I generally cut my workpieces about within 1/8" of final dimension width at the bandsaw and finish in the manner described above. The table saw is not involved until it comes time for crosscutting.

    I cannot remember the last time I actually ripped a board of wood at the table saw. I have come to really enjoy milling this way. Hope this helps

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    519
    Hi Edwin,
    Thanks for this information. I will need to try your method to see if it will work for me.
    David

  10. Hey,
    Please someone help me.
    I'm searching for the price of routertable. Could someone tell me?

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    6,524
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    Hi Mike,
    I agree completely! What a joy to use, plus it adds a great degree of safety by keeping the hands away from the saw blade. To date, I have been setting my miter fence to 90 degrees using a machined insert for the miter slot along with a large framing square (see photo 1). I thought about your comment on using the dial indicator - so I thought I'd try that approach to see how accurate my original method is. I used a large precision ground fixturing block banked against the miter fence and mounted the dial indicator to the table saw surface. The result is that I am measuring around 0.005" to 0.006" per foot of slider travel. So for my current setup with 36" length of cut, this would give me around 0.015" to 0.018" of taper over the 36" cut distance. This is not bad for most applications, but it is easy enough to go ahead with the final adjustment and "dial it in" for the best accuracy. I would be interested to see photos of your dial indicator setup - perhaps you have an easier method.
    Thanks,
    David
    David
    I use the same basic method to set the fence, as you do, but I use a large precision triangle made by Brian Lamb.
    When I first set it up I also made sure the slider by itself was running parallel to the blade in basically the same manner. That took a bit of doing as I had to make sure the slider base portion was parallel to the blade, and that it was running even with the table saw surface.
    I know some folks had problems with the JessEm Mast-R-Slide, but luckily I never did. I've actually been looking for a second one, or something similar for y second table saw.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    519
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    David
    I use the same basic method to set the fence, as you do, but I use a large precision triangle made by Brian Lamb.
    When I first set it up I also made sure the slider by itself was running parallel to the blade in basically the same manner. That took a bit of doing as I had to make sure the slider base portion was parallel to the blade, and that it was running even with the table saw surface.
    I know some folks had problems with the JessEm Mast-R-Slide, but luckily I never did. I've actually been looking for a second one, or something similar for y second table saw.
    Hi Mike,

    Thanks for your reply. I used a similar method to check the parallelism between the Grizzly sliding attachment T-slots/table travel and the table saw miter slots/blade and it was pretty much dead-on. Maybe I got lucky, or perhaps this particular item is a quality item. Without the legs attached, the slider table was not parallel to the saw table by a very small amount - probably around 0.010" to 0.015" over distance from the edge of the slider where it attaches the the table saw to the blade, maybe 10" or so. I used the adjustable legs to put a slight upward pressure on the slider to bring it to parallel. I was checking this with a Starrett machinist straight edge and feeler gauges. It is now pretty close to parallel (within a few thou.). Per the suggestion in the slider attachment manual, I set the top surface of the slider about 0.015" above the top surface of the table saw. This does keep the work piece, sled, or jig from rubbing on the table saw top surface and seems to make for a smooth operation.

    I could probably use some thin shim stock between the lower portion of the mating surfaces to correct this. Right now - I have the support legs resting on the shop floor. I intend to modify the legs so that they use the table saw mobile base for support to facilitate moving the saw around in the shop without having to readjust the legs each time. I just checked out Brian's website and it looks like he has some "top-notch" products. If I didn't already have some precision fixture blocks, I would consider purchasing one of his precision squares.

    The Grizzly sliding attachment is currently priced at $750 plus shipping. I think that this is a pretty fair price for the quality of the product and what it can do to help improve the functionality of the cabinet saw.

    Thanks,
    David

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    859
    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Brown View Post
    Hey,
    Please someone help me.
    I'm searching for the price of routertable. Could someone tell me?
    We need more information. Are you looking for a particular router table? Search for router table on Google and you will usually see prices.
    Marshall
    ---------------------------
    A Stickley fan boy.

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