Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 63

Thread: How many handplanes do you have?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Itapevi, SP - Brazil
    Posts
    391

    Red face Humble collection

    On use:
    Lie Nielsen 60 1/2 Block Plane
    Lie Nielsen 62 Jack Plane (two different blades, two additional blades coming soon)

    At reserve:
    Two cheap Stanleys, one block plane and one no. 4
    All the best.

    Osvaldo.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    South West Ontario
    Posts
    852
    Long workbench! Lovely to have all your tools laid out for easy reach, the drawers under the bench must be empty
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    South West Ontario
    Posts
    852
    Many years I had just a Jack and a Block plane, did not stop me building furniture!
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  4. #34
    Something more than 30, but I hope less than 40. Well maybe around 40 or so if we counted ones waiting restoration. All users, nothing a particularly valuable representation of its breed. All with the original iron, well at least the one that came with the plane when I got it, or an iron that came in a similar plane that fit.

    Sizes 3-8 for bench -lots of 3s 4s 4 1/2s and 5s, a bunch of block planes, router plane, compass plane, some rabbit planes, scrub planes, and some specialty ones. A WWII vintage #3 is my favorite, and a #6 & #78 from my great grandfather my most sentimental. I still have the original Sweetheart box for the #78. It is probably worth more than the plane itself

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,003
    Just starting out with hand tools and just got my first proper bench but so far I have the following planes

    LN 60 1/2
    LN 4 1/2 Bronze
    LN 62 Jack
    LN #7
    LN 041 small shoulder
    LN 042 medium shoulder
    LN 073 large shoulder

    I think next on my list is a LN 071 router plane

  6. #36
    All I can says is, "a bunch". That includes 2 half sets of hollows and rounds, a passel of profile molders and snipe bills, and of course all of my bench and joinery planes. Don't even ask about spokeshaves. I'm not sure and I haven't, counted but it is at least 16 or 18. I made the body for another one Sunday as I was teaching a class on how to make a spokeshave for our NH guild.
    Dave Anderson
    Chester Toolworks LLC
    Chester, NH

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    East Virginia
    Posts
    699
    Just the basics:
    Record #5 Jack Plane
    Stanley-Bailey #4 Smoother
    Stanley-Bailey #7 Jointer
    Stanley #40 Scrub Plane
    Stanley #113 Circular Plane
    Stanley #78 Rabbet Plane
    Stanley Low-Angle Block Plane
    Stanley #7 Router Plane
    Stanley #12 Scraper Plane
    Stanley #80 Cabinet Scraper
    Stanley Spokeshave
    Kunz Spokeshave

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    6,351
    I just thought I have a bunch of planes.

  9. #39
    Stanley Bench planes 3, 4, 5, 5 1/4, 8, 10 1/2 rabbet, 40 scrub, 62 low angle
    Stanley 112 scraper plane, 113 compass plane, 71 1/2 router
    Veritas rabbet, English bullnose rabbet
    Stanley 45, 55, Siegley combination plane, Record 50
    Stanley 98, 99 side rabbets
    stanley block planes 140, 65 and ohio tool low angle
    Ohio Tool Co razee
    Stanley 33 transitional with jointer fence
    mixed half set of hollows and rounds
    Ohio Tool moving fillister plane
    Sandusky panel raising plane
    tailed thumb plane
    set of wooden side rabbets
    set of wooden beading planes
    adjustable sash molding plane
    veneering plane
    Stanley 78 duplex plane
    Stanley 95 edge plane
    radi-plane
    50 molding planes with various profiles.

    Mike

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    6,396
    I have a lot of handplanes - more than any sane person needs. I have a lot more curiosity than sanity. Nevertheless, when I am building, I tend to stick to a core and use just those.

    The jack plane of choice is a woodie I built 10 years ago (the far left in the photo). It is dedicated to removal of waste with a 10" camber. (I do have another jack, a Stanley #605, which has two blades, and it generally goes with me to wood shows since it is more versatile).

    The jointer of choice is a Veritas Custom #7 (far right). This has a 40 degree frog and is useful for not only end grain, but tearout-free face- and edge grain with the chipbreaker closed down. For short boards with narrow edges, the HNT Gordon Trying Plane excels. This has a 60 degree bed. Alternately, I may pull out a vintage Stanley #62, because it is extraordinarily light.

    I have a couple of smoothers ready to go. It is generally a toss up between a Veritas Custom #4 (42 degree frog) and a LN #3 (45 degree frog), both using PM-V11 blades. I may pull out a Veritas BU Smoother (62 degree cutting angle) if needing a very fine shaving, as it excels in this.

    I have a bunch of block planes. They are a little like using spokeshaves or chisels to me - fine tuning edges, chamfers, end grain ... The Veritas NX60 is an amazing plane to use and to hold. The new small pocket plane is very useful for tiny areas.



    The plane that means the most to me - and I would grab first in a fire - is a rather nondescript smoother in Hornbeam (centre left), which was built by Jim Krenov.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    130
    I see the names Siegley and Ohio Tool and I think, cool, now there's not your run of the mill assortment. I'd trade even my Stanley's for some of the Ohio Tool Co metal planes I've missed out on over the years. They appear of superior quality.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    130
    Elegant set. Beautiful!

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Columbus, IN
    Posts
    28
    I have just the right amount, except for that last one I need to pick up.

  14. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Kurtis Johnson View Post
    I see the names Siegley and Ohio Tool and I think, cool, now there's not your run of the mill assortment. I'd trade even my Stanley's for some of the Ohio Tool Co metal planes I've missed out on over the years. They appear of superior quality.
    I just bought my Ohio Tool Co low angle block plane (sorry don't know the number) and fell so in love with it after tuning it up, I sold my Stanley 60 1/2. Ohio Tool Co made some seriously nice planes. If people knew how well they were made, they would be more valuable than Stanleys'.

    Mike

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Pleasant Grove, UT
    Posts
    1,501
    I would have to say probably about 20, doing this from memory while at work.

    4 Block planes:

    LN 601/2 Low Angle
    Veritas NX60
    Veritas Standard
    LN Rabbet Block Plane

    Bench Planes:
    Veritas BU Jointer, Jack and LA Smoother
    Veritas Custom #4, Custom #5(?) (I'm typing this at work while I wait for a job to finish up.)
    LN #3
    Record #4
    Stanley #7 (modern - I think I sold this..., if not, I will.)
    vintage #6C that needs refurbishing
    LN Scrub plane

    Joinery/Specialty
    Veritas Large & Medium Shoulder Planes
    Veritas Router Plane
    Veritas LH & RH Skew Rabbet Planes
    Veritas Small Plow Plane
    Record #78(?)
    Veritas Side Rabbet Plane (this thing is HANDY.)
    Veritas Shooting Plane (pricey, but schwweeeeeet)

    Yes, it's true. I probably paid for a semester of college for one of the Lee kids.

    I'm probably going to send the Veritas Block plane on down the road, possibly the Record #4. I'd like to get the Veritas Combination plane, and the Walken-Moore router plane looks pretty nifty. Rust hunting has no real appeal to me, which is why there's few vintage planes. I had several that I sold about a year or so ago. I actually have gotten more VALUE out of the joinery and specialty planes than the bench planes.
    It came to pass...
    "Curiosity is the ultimate power tool." - Roy Underhill
    The road IS the destination.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •