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Thread: Moving my workshop

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Clayton , North Carolina
    Posts
    94

    Moving my workshop

    I plan on moving several states away next year and am wondering about the best way to move my workshop. It's actually a 2 car garage that I need to clear out a month or so prior to the move and am wondering about renting a POD or whatever they call those things. Plan to put my stuff in the POD and then restore the garage to it's previous "luster" because its kind of a disaster after having a workshop in it for nearly 20 years. Am looking for suggestions on what to rent. Also wouldn't mind some thoughts on how to restore the floor of the garage to cover up all those spills that occur over the years. Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    48,562
    Since you have a period of time that will require storage, the "POD" type idea is a pretty good one. Obviously, the nature of your tools comes into play here.

    On the floor thing...there are appropriate finishes available to put on a "garage floor" that should help cover up the aging "mishaps".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Medina Ohio
    Posts
    3,658
    Do you have a truck that could pull a large trailer. By the time you pay for the pod and having it moved you could buy a large enclosed trailer and then sell it when you move

  4. #4
    We moved from the West Coast to the Prairies a few years ago. Had a company called Big Steel Box drop a 20' shipping container in the driveway and I loaded it and then a second. They picked them up and trucked them here and dropped them off on our property for $6000Can. There are similar companies everywhere that do the same. I spread the shop and household things in both containers with the tools and machines on the bottom and the lighter household stuff on top of them. I built "fences" every 5 feet or so into the corrugations of the container as I loaded it. They kept everything from moving as there were no where near enough tie downs in the containers.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mountain City, TN
    Posts
    430
    We used U Pack/ABF. They dropped off a 28 foot trailer at our house. Three days later they picked it up. They will store your trailer as well. It cost us $3500 to move from Minnesota to Tennessee.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    235
    No experience with the various types of containers, but I'd suggest lots of moving blankets - Harbor Freight sells them for cheap.

    Re: the garage floor - save your time and money. Stains on the garage floor aren't going to make the difference between selling and not selling, nor likely to have much impact on price. Put the money into making the bathrooms and kitchen prettier.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Eastern Iowa
    Posts
    424
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas L Carpenter View Post
    ...... that I need to clear out a month or so prior to the move and am wondering about renting a POD or whatever they call those things.....
    Thanks for any help.
    First, I removed the motors from my unisaw, DeWalt radial arm saw, and my 15Ē drill press.
    I did not want that weight stressing the mounts, trunions, arm as the trailer bounced up and down driving on the roads. Others have left the motors on with no ill effects. That is all the advice I have for the move.

    Second. You didnít say what month youíre moving, but according to weather undergound, Clayton, NC, can get pretty muggy some months. You may want to evaluate your current procedures to abate rust and moisture, then try to duplicate those within the constraints of a storage container. If you are one of the lucky ones that never have to worry about humidity, then nothing needs to be done. If not, ....

    A few years back our school district rented some pods to store desks and classroom furniture during a summer construction project, only to discover in mid August that all the metal desks and file cabinets had rusted and all the wooden desks and organic materials had been overcome with mold from the summer humidity. Eight entire classrooms of new furniture, supplies, books.... it wasnít pretty.

    An extension cord and dehumidifier could go a long way to protect your investment.
    Comments made here are my own and, according to my children, do not reflect the opinions of any other person... anywhere, anytime.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Clayton , North Carolina
    Posts
    94
    All good suggestions except for the truck - I don't have one. I am also inundated with ads for moving pods etc because I searched for them on google. Thanks again. I really liked the one about leaving the garage floor as is.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Kamiah, ID
    Posts
    275
    I'll throw my two cents in. We moved a few years ago and used ABF like Bill B above for our household. We had that 28' trailer loaded to the gills. It was very convenient on the pick up end. On the delivery end that trailer full our life's possessions was left overnight in an open lot behind a grocery store in town. It got delivered the next day fully intact but we were not happy.

    All my heavy shop equipment I moved myself on a gooseneck trailer inside a used delivery truck box that I picked up cheap. That box is now used for storage. That part actually worked out better than I had planned. I made a few trips with our more delicate/sensitive items (400 mi one way) on that trailer, though only one trip with the box on...it was huge, fuel sucking sail.

    Something to keep in mind is how are you going to load your heavy stuff. I had a tractor with forks at my old place and a bigger one at my new place. The ABF trailer is 3.5' off the ground and the deck on my gooseneck trailer is 3' off the ground. PODS or similar I think sit on the ground when delivered.

    As to the floor, we had several buildings for our various vocations/avocations. All had spots of some kind on their respective floors (I lived there for 34 yrs, it's gonna happen). Didn't seem like it even registered on the buyers. In fact, they weren't even sure what they were going to do with it all. They were mostly interested in the 3 most important things in real estate...location, location and location.

    Good luck on your move!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,562
    Pods are at ground level, but still require a little bit of lift to get stuff into them, so that has to be a consideration....some kind of ramp with a reasonable slope or something that can actually lift heavy stuff like stationary tools.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,578
    Machine shop types say Pod floors are too lightweight for heavy machines. Consider buying a cargo container so you have it for a storage shed at the other end. You could buy a big trailer and resell afterwards. If you do that think about renting a big truck just to haul the trailer.
    If you buy a truck or trailer and resell the price will not go down just because you add 1000 miles. The resale price may be higher or lower in your new location. If lower it may be cheaper to buy in the new location and drive round trip.
    Bil lD.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Clayton , North Carolina
    Posts
    94
    I don't have any monster woodworking machines, just the basic 110v table saw, 14 inch bandsaw, jointer, old timey lath, benchtop machines, and assorted tables, benches etc. Should be ok for a pod type storage system. I'm old and creaky so I would rather sell everything and start over rather than face the job of lifting everything into a trailer or truck bed. Also considering hiring someone to do it for me but that would be a little pricey I think.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    8,521
    PODS and ABF both publish load limits for their containers. You can check, but Iím pretty sure you wonít be near it.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,578
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas L Carpenter View Post
    I don't have any monster woodworking machines, just the basic 110v table saw, 14 inch bandsaw, jointer, old timey lath, benchtop machines, and assorted tables, benches etc. Should be ok for a pod type storage system. I'm old and creaky so I would rather sell everything and start over rather than face the job of lifting everything into a trailer or truck bed. Also considering hiring someone to do it for me but that would be a little pricey I think.
    Ask the local high school sports team to come by and move the heavy stuff for you. Stuff them with piazza as payment along with a cash donation to the department. Football and wrestling come to mind.
    Bil lD

  15. #15
    If you do go the trailer route(buying and selling) you could pull it with a uhaul. My buddy rented a large uhaul and a car trailer for not too much money from Kansas back to Jersey.

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