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Thread: Band saw blade size and burning

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Maryland
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    Band saw blade size and burning

    Hi all,

    i finally bit the bullet and got a new bandsaw, Jet JBS-14SFX. I am generally very happy with it but I have two questions:

    First the saw seems to burn hardwood of 2-3 thick. I’ve tried different feed rates but it seems to consistently cause some burning. Any thoughts about why this would be? The stock blade is 5/8” deep by 116.25 long, 4 tpi, hook type, 025” thick. Burning happens whether crosscutting or ripping, straight or curved cuts, although it’s worse on curves.

    Which brings me to question 2: thinking that the blade that came with the saw is probably not great, one thing I am going to try is replacing the blade. The spec sheet for the saw says it takes a 116” blade. But the owners manual says the blade is 116.25. I can find replacement blades that are 116.0 and 116.5. But not ones that are 116.25. My initial thought was to go with 116.5 to give me a little extra room, but then it occurred to me that since the spec sheet says 116, maybe 116 and 116.25 are interchangeable. Any thoughts here?

    I emailed the blade length question to Jet and they have not replied.

    thanks for your help!

    -dan
    Last edited by Dan Gaylin; 04-17-2019 at 9:50 AM.

  2. #2
    First things first, congrats on your new saw purchase. Be correct with with the blade tension and if that is correct it may be wise to buy a quality blade, and there are so many choices that can be confusing.

    In general, manufacturers are so tight with their tooth set this burning doesn't surprise me. Table saw blades are equal in that fault but I guess we should feel fortunate too little tooth set in a band blade doesn't promote kick back as it does in table saw blades.

  3. #3
    What is your main use of the bandsaw? Resawing, tight curved lines, etc?

  4. #4
    1/4" of blade length is 1/8" of movement in your tension adjustment. Without knowing the actual length of your current blade it is difficult to determine if a longer blade would be a problem. Hopefully some other owners of the same model saw will chime in on what they buy.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Maryland
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    Thanks for the helpful replies. . I do everything with the saw: resawing, knocking the corners off of bowl blanks to make discs for turning, crosscutting dimensioned lumber and boards. Saw is properly adjusted and tensioned. Not a lot of tight curves. I kept my smaller bandsaw for that (old 10” craftsman’ bench top). In general does higher tension or lower tension lead to burning?

    Robet, what do you mean by “tight with their tooth set”? I thought 4 tpi on a bandsaw with a 5/8 deep blade and a resaw throat of 13” seemed like a lot of teeth. The blade I am thinking of changing to is a Timberwolf 1/2” deep 3 tpi. It’s a new model saw so I’m not sure how many folks might chime in.
    Last edited by Dan Gaylin; 04-17-2019 at 11:16 AM.

  6. #6
    Get a 116" carbide blade.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  7. #7
    Hi,
    Get the 116" blade.

    When choosing blades follow the 3/6 rule for TPI. No less than 3, no more than 6 teeth in the work. If you were cutting a 3" thick workpiece and used a 4tpi blade you had 12 teeth in the cut. The gullets were not deep enough to clear sawdust efficiently.

    Note: the 3/6 rule does not apply to certain blades like the carbide Lenox tri-master or woodslicer blades.

    If you are doing a tall resaw or working with thick stock and must violate the 3/6 rule, just use the lowest tpi you can. In a carbon steel blade this is probably going to be 3 tpi.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gaylin View Post

    Robet, what do you mean by “tight with their tooth set”? I thought 4 tpi on a bandsaw with a 5/8 deep blade and a resaw throat of 13” seemed like a lot of teeth. The blade I am thinking of changing to is a Timberwolf 1/2” deep 3 tpi. It’s a new model saw so I’m not sure how many folks might chime in.
    ************************************************** ************
    "tight" meaning not enough set in my opinion. Measure the kerf and the blade blank. Half of that difference will be the approximate set in a tooth.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Maryland
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    Quote Originally Posted by robert wiggins View Post
    ************************************************** ************
    "tight" meaning not enough set in my opinion. Measure the kerf and the blade blank. Half of that difference will be the approximate set in a tooth.
    Thanks! And sorry for misspelling your name

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Maryland
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    Thanks Edwin, thatís helpful. I was generally aware of this rule of thumb but the additional details are very useful. Why do you think the 116 is the way to go?

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gaylin View Post
    Thanks! And sorry for misspelling your name
    I didn't even notice. I have a niece that pronounced it like that when she was little so that really isn't new. Even being grown now she still remembers that and uses it once in awhile just to tease her uncle " Robet ".

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    7,865
    Do you have a bandsaw blade shop? One near here (in Knoxville, TN) will make blades to any length using Lennox stock. I take an existing blade and the guy duplicates the length. The cost is less than buying one elsewhere and he can usually make a blade while I wait. The Lennox web site will tell you if and what blade shops are closest to your area.

    I mostly use 1/2" 3tpi Lenox steel blades for preparing turning blanks of all sizes and types, from pen blanks up to 12" thick, green and dry, soft and very hard woods. The "rule" about the number of teeth in a cut is a guideline but not useful for cuts in 12" wood. It also doesn't work with my Woodmizer bandsaw mill since it would limit me to narrow logs. I've used 4tpi blades on 12" thick wood with no problems - might have to slow down a little.

    "Consistently" burning sounds really wrong. I would suspect not enough set in the teeth, dull blade, guides not adjusted properly, pushing too hard/fast, or tension too low. If tension is too low the blade can do a variety of bad things, for example bowing in the cut for thick wood. The tension indicator on most bandsaws is worthless - I use a blade tension gauge to be sure of the tension and I consistently have to use a much higher tension than indicated by the marks on every bandsaw I've had and tried. Before you do much else try increasing tension - for a 1/2" blade try the setting for a 3/4" or larger blade.

    If you are not yet experienced with bandsaws perhaps you could get someone to look and try yours.

    JKJ


    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gaylin View Post
    Hi all,

    i finally bit the bullet and got a new bandsaw, Jet JBS-14SFX. I am generally very happy with it but I have two questions:

    First the saw seems to burn hardwood of 2-3 thick. I’ve tried different feed rates but it seems to consistently cause some burning. Any thoughts about why this would be? The stock blade is 5/8” deep by 116.25 long, 4 tpi, hook type, 025” thick. Burning happens whether crosscutting or ripping, straight or curved cuts, although it’s worse on curves.

    Which brings me to question 2: thinking that the blade that came with the saw is probably not great, one thing I am going to try is replacing the blade. The spec sheet for the saw says it takes a 116” blade. But the owners manual says the blade is 116.25. I can find replacement blades that are 116.0 and 116.5. But not ones that are 116.25. My initial thought was to go with 116.5 to give me a little extra room, but then it occurred to me that since the spec sheet says 116, maybe 116 and 116.25 are interchangeable. Any thoughts here?

    I emailed the blade length question to Jet and they have not replied.

    thanks for your help!

    -dan
    Last edited by John K Jordan; 04-17-2019 at 9:56 PM. Reason: typo

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    156
    In my 18" Jet I use 132 and 133" blades, both work fine. I can't even recall which one it's supposed to have. There's a range of travel for the upper wheel, and whether your current blade is nearer the tighter or the looser end may help determine what length you want. I buy whichever length is cheaper when I'm buying on eBay or something like that.
    Zach

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Do you have a bandsaw blade shop? One near here (in Knoxville, TN) will make blades to any length using Lennox stock. I

    JKJ
    Can you tell me the bandsaw blade shop in Knoxville? I'm down I-75 S and have been ordering my Lenox blades from Bandsawdirect. They're good, but take about 10 days from order to delivery. Having someone closer might save me in a pinch.

    Thanks.
    "From the point of view of a tapeworm, man was created by God to serve the appetite of the tapeworm." Edward Abbey

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Maryland
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    This is all really helpful. Thanks for the replies.

    Carbide blades are tempting but so pricey!

    John, Iím not an expert but Iím also not new to setting up band saws, and Iím pretty certain I have it correct. In fact I did exactly what you indicated when I noticed blade deflection with resawing: the tension gauge is set at 3/4Ē for a 5/8Ē blade. Helped with the deflection but not the burning. Should note it is not a massive amount of burning but itís there.

    Im pretty sure the stock blade is really crappy so hopefully the new Timberwolf will solve the problem.

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