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Thread: Laguna CFLUX-1 conversion from 110v to 220v?

  1. #1

    Question Laguna CFLUX-1 conversion from 110v to 220v?

    Anyone changed over from 110 to 220 on one of these? I知 contemplating it and wondering if it痴 within my capabilities vs. hiring an electrician as they seem to recommend. I can follow instructions, and I know a little about electrical work (I do my own switches and outlets and such). Thanks in advance,
    You can fix stupid, but there are often legal ramifications

  2. #2
    Rewiring the motor to 240 should be trivial (flip a few wires around inside the motor's junction box, likely per a diagram shown on the inside of said junction box), but I wonder if the remote control system would need to be replaced?

    In any case: are you sure you need to do this? It's a fairly small motor - it may be easier to run a larger (or separate) 120V circuit.

  3. #3
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    I think you need to replace the entire control panel switch.
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    Rewiring the motor to 240 should be trivial (flip a few wires around inside the motor's junction box, likely per a diagram shown on the inside of said junction box), but I wonder if the remote control system would need to be replaced?

    In any case: are you sure you need to do this? It's a fairly small motor - it may be easier to run a larger (or separate) 120V circuit.
    I知 not sure yet ... I知 trying to run on a tight electrical budget (I ran a 60 amp feed to my shop). It remains to be seen if the CFLUX causes me any trouble in that regard. I知 just trying to think ahead. Thanks for the reply.
    You can fix stupid, but there are often legal ramifications

  5. #5
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    It's doubtful that you'll see any real benefit from switching voltages on this particular tool and if there is a built-in remote control, that could require changing a potentially expensive part out, depending on how the machine is designed. As Tim mentioned, if the unit is designed to support 240v, too, there should be indications of that in the box where the line cord terminates or thereabouts. And, of course, contacting the vendor isn't a horrible idea, too. While over time there have been a few machines that offered slightly more power if rewired to 240v because of a special design in the motor wiring to support that, most tools have the same power at either voltage when they support both 120v and 240v.
    --

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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    It's doubtful that you'll see any real benefit from switching voltages on this particular tool and if there is a built-in remote control, that could require changing a potentially expensive part out, depending on how the machine is designed. As Tim mentioned, if the unit is designed to support 240v, too, there should be indications of that in the box where the line cord terminates or thereabouts. And, of course, contacting the vendor isn't a horrible idea, too. While over time there have been a few machines that offered slightly more power if rewired to 240v because of a special design in the motor wiring to support that, most tools have the same power at either voltage when they support both 120v and 240v.
    Not really looking for more power per se, looking to reduce the overall amperage draw on the shop line if I need to. The conversion to 220 from Laguna includes a new control board, which should take care of the remote issues. I really was just interested if my one had done this conversion on this machine and, if so, any watchouts or red flags.
    You can fix stupid, but there are often legal ramifications

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Cannon View Post
    Not really looking for more power per se, looking to reduce the overall amperage draw on the shop line if I need to. The conversion to 220 from Laguna includes a new control board, which should take care of the remote issues. I really was just interested if my one had done this conversion on this machine and, if so, any watchouts or red flags.
    Yes you need to swap out the control board (I have the Pflux and the electricals should be similar.) It's an 80 dollar part, expect potential delays. I've done the conversion. As to whether you should hire an electrician, it depends on whether you or the electrician are smarter, because you'll both be following the same instructions. Decent needle-nose pliers are advisable, because the enclosure for the control board is cramped. Taking pictures is probably a good idea. If you can confidently swap out a light fixture, then you can do this conversion.

    Standard caveats apply.
    Last edited by Doug Dawson; 04-18-2019 at 6:06 AM.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    Yes you need to swap out the control board (I have the Pflux and the electricals should be similar.) It's an 80 dollar part, expect potential delays. I've done the conversion. As to whether you should hire an electrician, it depends on whether you or the electrician are smarter, because you'll both be following the same instructions. Decent needle-nose pliers are advisable, because the enclosure for the control board is cramped. Taking pictures is probably a good idea. If you can confidently swap out a light fixture, then you can do this conversion.

    Standard caveats apply.
    I did the C flux-1 conversion to 220 based on instructions that Laguna emailed me, but haven't plugged it in yet. The instructions have labeled wires, but my junction box has terminals. I =think= I did it right. I've been trying to get in touch with Laguna's tech support to get confirmation of my wiring (ruining a $1200 unit because of a crossed wire worries me), but have had no no luck with them.

    For those who have successfully done this, can you share a wiring diagram?

    Thanks in advance

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Cannon View Post
    Not really looking for more power per se, looking to reduce the overall amperage draw on the shop line if I need to. The conversion to 220 from Laguna includes a new control board, which should take care of the remote issues. I really was just interested if my one had done this conversion on this machine and, if so, any watchouts or red flags.
    Tim

    The above that I have bolded in red is not going to happen. The amount of load, in current, will remain the same. ( You would need a lab setting to see any actual difference in switching from 120vac to 240 vac.)
    Your motor requires a certain amount of power in "Watts", regardless of the voltage input. The difference is in the application of voltage potential for the power legs.
    If it is a question of balancing the loads inside the panel, that does have a measurable value that would a significant consideration, and converting to 240vac will balance the panel, as far as the motor current draw is concerned.
    If converting to 240vac allows you to add the remote that has been referenced, that sounds worthwhile.
    You will not save anything in current/power draw.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 07-09-2019 at 10:56 AM.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    Tim

    The above that I have bolded in red is not going to happen. The amount of load, in current, will remain the same. ( You would need a lab setting to see any actual difference in switching from 120vac to 240 vac.)
    Your motor requires a certain amount of power in "Watts", regardless of the voltage input. The difference is in the application of voltage potential for the power legs.
    If it is a question of balancing the loads inside the panel, that does have a measurable value that would a significant consideration, and converting to 240vac will balance the panel, as far as the motor current draw is concerned.
    If converting to 240vac allows you to add the remote that has been referenced, that sounds worthwhile.
    You will not save anything in current/power draw.
    The bottom line for me (with the P|Flux 1) was that it's easier to run the unit off one of my many existing 220 outlets than to have to install 30 amp 120 outlets all over the place, which is kind of freakish.

    Re the motor wiring, the instructions were sufficient to be able to identify which wire was which and where to connect it. I don't remember the details because my memory is going.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    Tim

    The above that I have bolded in red is not going to happen. The amount of load, in current, will remain the same. ( You would need a lab setting to see any actual difference in switching from 120vac to 240 vac.)
    Your motor requires a certain amount of power in "Watts", regardless of the voltage input. The difference is in the application of voltage potential for the power legs.
    If it is a question of balancing the loads inside the panel, that does have a measurable value that would a significant consideration, and converting to 240vac will balance the panel, as far as the motor current draw is concerned.
    If converting to 240vac allows you to add the remote that has been referenced, that sounds worthwhile.
    You will not save anything in current/power draw.
    I don't understand your comment here, Mike. Converting to 240 volts will certainly not change the power draw but it will change the current draw. Ignoring power factor issues, power is volts times current. If power stays the same and voltage is doubled, current has to be halved.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    I don't understand your comment here, Mike. Converting to 240 volts will certainly not change the power draw but it will change the current draw. Ignoring power factor issues, power is volts times current. If power stays the same and voltage is doubled, current has to be halved.

    Mike
    Mike
    Actual power stays the same. I agree that the current per conductor will be halved, but unless I am not understanding Tim's post, he is looking to decrease "overall amperage" on his "shop line". I did interpret "shop line", to be a 240vac feeder supply from a remote panel.

    The power in a 240vac circuit is the same for given load, as it would be for a 120vac load. Lets assume a 1-1/2HP motor. What is not the same is the current in each leg.
    If I am drawing 9 amps on the hot leg in a 120vac powered circuit for that motor, I will be drawing 4.5 amps in either leg of the 240 vac circuit powering that same motor. ( These are approximate values.)
    The current in each conductor in a 240vac circuit for that motor will be less, but the total amount will be the same for a given cycle period.
    I'm not trying to be contrary here. The cost, in KW/HR's,will be the same.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 07-09-2019 at 3:44 PM.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    Mike
    Actual power stays the same. I agree that the current per conductor will be halved, but unless I am not understanding Tim's post, he is looking to decrease "overall amperage" on his "shop line". I did interpret "shop line", to be a 240vac feeder supply from a remote panel.

    The power in a 240vac circuit is the same for given load, as it would be for a 120vac load. Lets assume a 1-1/2HP motor. What is not the same is the current in each leg.
    If I am drawing 9 amps on the hot leg in a 120vac powered circuit for that motor, I will be drawing 4.5 amps in either leg of the 240 vac circuit powering that same motor. ( These are approximate values.)
    The current in each conductor in a 240vac circuit for that motor will be less, but the total amount will be the same for a given cycle period.
    I'm not trying to be contrary here. The cost, in KW/HR's,will be the same.
    I'm afraid you're not correct on that amperage, Mike. Let's assume you have a residential 240 volt center-tapped electrical system and you have nothing else on that system but our example motor.

    For your 1-1/2HP motor operating at 120 volts, drawing 9 amps, your circuit will be one of the hot legs and the neutral and a total of 9 amps will flow through that circuit. That is, nine amps will flow through the hot leg and nine amps will flow through the neutral back to the transformer. You must have two wires and the same current must flow through both conductors.

    When you convert to 240V the only difference is that the two hot wires are used for the circuit. And since the motor is drawing the same power, the motor will draw 4.5 amps. Those 4.5 amps will flow from one hot to the motor, to the other hot, and back to the transformer.

    You cannot add the amperage in the two wires that make up a circuit - it's the same current.

    In your example, for the motor running at 120 volts, there will be 9 amps flowing from the transformer, through the motor. As far as the transformer is concerned, it's a 9 amp load.

    For the motor running at 240 volts there will be 4.5 amps flowing from the transformer through the motor. As far as the transformer is concerned, it's a 4.5 amp load.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  14. #14
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    Mike
    I agree with what you posted.No dispute there.
    My original point is that the power requirements must remain the same for a single cycle.
    If the power required remains the same, for a single cycle, there is no net savings. If I run that 1-1/2 hp motor at 15 cents per KW/HR, at either 120 or 240, the electric bill will be the same.
    In a single pole circuit, 120vac, in a given single cycle, I will have 9.5 amps for half of the cycle.
    In a two pole circuit, I will have two 4.5 amp periods,within a single cycle.
    The current in either leg/ pole of the 240 vac will absolutely be less than in the leg of a single pole circuit.
    In the end, the power required will be the same.
    I must not be expressing myself well. I don't really look at circuits from an amperage point. I tend to look at them from total load. The current just tells me what size wire and breaker to use. For that I apologize to the OP. I am just trying to emphasize that there is no net benefit swapping to 240vac from 120vac for the load, motor, itself.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 07-09-2019 at 7:11 PM.

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