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Thread: 8" Jointer Options

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Central New Jersey
    Posts
    87
    I purchased the Laguna 6" model 2 years back. The difference between the Laguna and my 6" Delta with straight blades is like night and day. The machine is smooth, quite and leaves a great surface on the sides that are run through it. Plane the other side down to thickness and sand. If I was to do it again, i'd go for the 8". For about the same price, the GO858 looks like an amazing machine also . I just keep passing on Grizzly tools even though they are always in my consideration list when buying a new tool.

  2. #17
    I have a jointer with a helical head. I will say that not necessarily all of the so-called "advantages" of the helical head are quite what they are cracked up to be, or are a viable factor in acquiring one. Several of them though are in fact real advantages. I don't understand the comments above that "you will plane the board anyway".....I don't, at least not on the side I just flattened. It doesn't need to be run on the side that was just flattened on my jointer. It does get planed to thickness, but one side, the side I just did on the jointer is fine and does not get planed.
    Carbide insert cutters do a better job with figured wood or where the grain reverses for sure, but it is not always a cure all. I will say too that a helical head and carbide cutters cannot produce a better finer finish than straight HSS blades, if the blades are good and sharp and properly set up. The problem is that they don't stay good and sharp for long. Probably the biggest advantage of a helical head is not in the way it cuts or that it last longer sharpness wise, it's more in the ease with which you can quickly reset the inserts when they finally do get dull. Finally, there is always the consideration of resale value. A quick look at classifieds reveals that you might just as well buy a brand new Powermatic helical head jointer as to buy one used, yet they always sell.
    Like 'em or hate 'em...the helical head cutter is the "rage of the age" so to speak.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    4,924
    You should plane the jointed side because you want to try to take off equal amounts of material from both sides of the stock to reduce the chance of wood movement after milling. If there’s any reactions that are going to happen, equalizing the cut will reduce it.

    For example, if your rough board is 4/4 and you want a 3/4 board, you’d joint just enough to get it flat, plane to get parallel sides, then remove material equally from both sides to get down to 3/4. So you’d plane the jointed face.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Western, NY
    Posts
    53
    I was recently in the market for a used 8" Jointer to upgrade from my 6" Delta. I looked and almost bought a few local machines that were in the $500-$700 range for a used 8" dovetail jointer. I am happy I took the advice from several folks on this forum, and I searched for a few months for Jointer/Planers so I could go wider. I ended up finding a Robland 12" Jointer Planer with a 3HP motor for less than I was going to pay for an 8" jointer used, and I am so happy I waited. I just had a large oak log milled into quartersawn boards, and many are in the 10-11" wide range. If you are in the $1000-$2000 budget range, you can find used J/P that would get you a wider jointer, and you'd only have one cutter head to upgrade if segmented was something that you valued. You have to be patient as they don't come up as often, but my sense is that it will be worth it.

  5. #20
    For you folks in used tool heaven, remember that many of us live in used tool deserts. For example, in the Mpls area, on CL, there have been three. 8" jointers listed in the last 4 months. The first two were overpriced relative to new, and both were gone in a matter of days. The third got listed yesterday, a PJ882 "new in crate" for $2000. After that for the entire state of MN, there are currently 7 other jointers listed, three gad-awful 6" Craftsmans with the non adjustable outfeed table, three sub 6" jointers, and one awful jointer-planer-sander combo.

    For many of us, used just isn't an option, no matter how much we would like it to be

  6. Quote Originally Posted by Matt Day View Post
    You should plane the jointed side because you want to try to take off equal amounts of material from both sides of the stock to reduce the chance of wood movement after milling. If there’s any reactions that are going to happen, equalizing the cut will reduce it.

    For example, if your rough board is 4/4 and you want a 3/4 board, you’d joint just enough to get it flat, plane to get parallel sides, then remove material equally from both sides to get down to 3/4. So you’d plane the jointed face.
    I totally agree....with some of your post, but you failed to think out all your post.....so, if I face join away lets say, 1/8" on the side to get the board flat.......then.......I plane another 1/8" off the other side {of a 5/4 board} I now have my 3/4 board with equal amounts taken off either side for minimal "reaction", which side lost more to cause the faced side to have to be planed????
    I get what you are trying to say, nice try, but the fact is nobody really worries about it to the 1/8 of an inch.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,150
    New machines are freighted from all over the world. Freighting a used machine 1000 miles is no big deal, just needs to be factored into price. As to a finished surface from a jointer, I'd argue the inconsistency in feed rate, and downward pressure relative to a machine with multiple hold downs and variable feed speed will always make a planed surface superior to a jointed one. Dave

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,322
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Kalnasy View Post
    But with the 0855 vs 0857, you are talking $125 and gaining 4 inches and parallelogram bed. Thoughts there?
    No brainer. Go wider. Especially for that drop-in-a-bucket cost difference. And it helps with your figured stock question because you can skew the material in whatever way works best for flattening to get the cleanest cut. Wide isn't always for wide things.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #24
    As to the point to go ahead and just get a 12" jointer, they'll be someone who says you'll never be satisfied with a 12" jointer so go ahead and get a 20" jointer.

    It becomes like someone who wants a bench-top drill press and someone says go ahead and get a used Bridgeport milling machine.

    It seems to me the OP expressed that he had room and the money for a new 8" Grizzly. I'm not second-guessing him as he seems to know what he wants, has done the research, and doesn't appear to want a used jointer for whatever reason.

    The Grizzly is a good jointer, at less money than other brand names and has great reviews from those that own or know about Grizzly jointers.

    Of course everyone has an opinion, but the only one with the money in the discussion is the OP.
    Once I was asked by a marriage councilor what changes I would have made in my past to be happier.

    "More dogs, fewer wives."

    The divorce papers were filed the following week. -Chapel Eastland

  10. #25
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Grassy Lake Alberta
    Posts
    786
    I am in the 12'' or bigger camp. My reasons are I have observed many woodworkers go from 6'' to 8'' ,12''. Why not just skip a step and get something you will not outgrow. A 12'' machine will have a footprint only slightly larger than most 8'' jointers and if it only costs $125 more what are we still talking about this for.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kees View Post
    I am in the 12'' or bigger camp. My reasons are I have observed many woodworkers go from 6'' to 8'' ,12''. Why not just skip a step and get something you will not outgrow. A 12'' machine will have a footprint only slightly larger than most 8'' jointers and if it only costs $125 more what are we still talking about this for.
    I assume you mean in the used market costing $125 more? I would love to find a 12" jointer, would have to be used, but a good brand for under $2000. I could only assume of the 'name brands' Grizzly would be the cheapest 12" option you can get new.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    395
    I have owned the Jet 8" helical head jointer for about 6 years. I think it is a great jointer and bought it when Jet equipment was on sale; at that time 15% off. Other than the difficulty in getting into my basement shop, it has been a great performer. I had two problems during the 5-year warranty: 1.The setscrew holding the cooling fan on the TEFC motor came loose and began rattling around inside the motor housing.; and 2. There was a short in the cord/plug which turned out to be caused by a cut in the cord's outer insulation at the connection to the plug (which by the way was wired by me since a plug was not included).

    In both cases, Jet contacted their local factory service contractor in my area who quickly scheduled an appointment for an onsite repair and repaired each within a couple of days after I reported it. to Jet. Given the fact that I had originally wired the plug, I don't think Jet was required to cover the service trip, but it wasn't an issue.

    Because of this response and the extremely high performance of the jointer, I recommend this jointer without question. Having an 8" jointer changed the quality of the planed/jointed wood I use for projects. Since I rarely find good wood wider than 8" these days, I can almost always flatten one side on the jointer first and then plane the other side to thickness. I always joint between rips when ripping the wood down to width and the jointer has always given me a flat, square edge for ripping and, then later, for gluing if necessary.

    I have nothing bad to say about the 8" Jet HH jointer.

    As an aside, it is my understanding that Grizzly does not provide onsite service regardless what the problem is.
    Last edited by Randy Heinemann; 04-15-2019 at 3:18 PM.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Evanston, IL
    Posts
    1,200
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kees View Post
    I am in the 12'' or bigger camp. My reasons are I have observed many woodworkers go from 6'' to 8'' ,12''. Why not just skip a step and get something you will not outgrow. A 12'' machine will have a footprint only slightly larger than most 8'' jointers and if it only costs $125 more what are we still talking about this for.
    Some confusion arose as a result of the OP's comparison of a 4" difference between Grizzly's 0855 and 0857. That is a 4" difference in length, not width. They are both 8" jointers.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    4,924
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Siebert View Post
    I totally agree....with some of your post, but you failed to think out all your post.....so, if I face join away lets say, 1/8" on the side to get the board flat.......then.......I plane another 1/8" off the other side {of a 5/4 board} I now have my 3/4 board with equal amounts taken off either side for minimal "reaction", which side lost more to cause the faced side to have to be planed????
    I get what you are trying to say, nice try, but the fact is nobody really worries about it to the 1/8 of an inch.
    Alright buddy, you da man.

    Yes of course there might be 1% of the time where to get two flat surface you can’t send the board through the planer on a light pass to remove jointer milling marks. The other 99% of the time you can easily flip the board and remove any tearout or milling marks from a standard knifed cutterhead. You go ahead and do what you do pal.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,462
    I did not know grizzly delivered outside of North America?
    Bil lD

    Quote Originally Posted by Chapel Eastland View Post
    The Italians also make some very good operas and pasta fagioli, but I'd go with the Grizzly 858.

    If you've got the money, the space, and that's what you want, get it. You'll have a nice tool that's new, well-made, and ready to go delivered to your shop.

    I understand those who say buy used, but you may be inheriting someone's problems and almost assuredly you will spend time and money bringing it up to snuff.

    Getting the helical cutter is a big plus and having it installed by the manufacturer instead of later getting a helical cutter installed is also a major consideration.

    The 8" size should suffice just fine for you.

    I think you already know you want the Grizzly so get it. Otherwise, you'll have buyer's remorse and still want the Grizzly.

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