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Thread: IBILD 3D Scans USS NJ Bell

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    South Jersey
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    64

    IBILD 3D Scans USS NJ Bell

    I thought I'd post a recent project I did for the Battleship NJ Museum ( https://www.battleshipnewjersey.org/ ) I was commissioned to scan the ship's bell from BB16 from 1906, which you can read more about here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_New_J ... sey_(BB-16)

    Originally someone was unsuccessful using photogrammetry techniques to capture the shape of the bell and the slightly incised lettering (only about .05" deep), so I was called out to 3D scan the bell. After scanning the bell on site, the data was brought into Aspire and remastered using Aspire's vector and 3D modelling tools. Due to compound polar distortion in how the lettering wrapped onto the hourglass shape of the bell, the shape of the letters were surprisingly distorted when in their unwrapped state. However, the unique tools in Aspire allowed me to remaster the overall shape of the bell, as well as deepen the lettering in preparation for 3D printing.

    The overall diameter of the bell is about 34.5" in diameter and it is about 30.25" tall. Since this will most likely be 3D printed using a large orifice nozzle (probably 1mm or larger vs 0.4mm for most hobby printers), the fine hand-punched texture present in the original would not be resolved with the large layer thickness typical of a large format 3D printer using a 1mm+ nozzle. Instead, the letters were first removed from the face of the bell using Aspire, then deepened from 0.05" deep to about 0.1" deep. This will allow the finishers to smear a bit of putty into the letters and use a punch to reproduce the original authentic texture.

    Anyway, I thought you guys would appreciate seeing this project and how Aspire can be instrumental in creating parts that are a bit outside the box. See attached PDF press release & pics.
    Attached Images Attached Images
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    IBILD High Resolution 3D Scanning Services

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,212
    Totally kewel project Brady! I'm glad you got the call to participate.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    That's a great story and project, Brady! Good job.

    David
    David

    Nothing to do with woodworking at all, just our music at church (I'm the guy with the Koa Takamine)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    64

    Project Update

    For those interested, 3D scan data can be used on both CNC routers/milling machines AND 3D Printing. Attached is a pic of the USS NJ Bell 3D printed full scale using my scan data. Now off to the paint department. I hope to post some pics when it's complete.
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    IBILD High Resolution 3D Scanning Services

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    314
    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Watson View Post
    For those interested, 3D scan data can be used on both CNC routers/milling machines AND 3D Printing. Attached is a pic of the USS NJ Bell 3D printed full scale using my scan data. Now off to the paint department. I hope to post some pics when it's complete.
    Hi Brady,
    Very nice!! Could you please elaborate on the 3d scanning technique that you used for this project? I am very interested.
    Thanks,
    David

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    64
    Hi David,
    I'm not sure how much I can tell you that isn't obvious in terms of technique, but I transported one of my non-contact optical scanners to the site along with an enclosure so we weren't competing with the sun. A series of scans were taken with an overlap so that they were able to be aligned to one another to create the complete bell shape. This is typical for this type of work - and I am sure there are scores of videos on YT that show this process, so I won't bore you with the details of that here.

    It is noteworthy to mention that neither hardware nor software can make up for improper planning or poor technique when it comes to this work. It takes a well-thought out plan and working in a logical sequence, making necessary adjustments along the way, to be successful. In this case, the enclosure was pretty hot inside, thanks to the sun - so I was soaked pretty good at the end of the session.

    Once the scans were complete, I filled in any holes and 'remastered' the data so that it was ready for 3D printing. It was necessary to create some areas that were not accessible to the scanner, such as the internal portions of the bell and some light sculpting to remove peeling paint etc that were not desirable on the final model. Since the original model file was about 2GB in size, that was reduced (decimated) to prevent the slicer software for the 3D printer from getting bogged down.

    Thanks for your interest.
    IBILD High Resolution 3D Scanning Services

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    314
    Hi Brady,
    Thanks for you explanation. I will check out some of the videos to learn more.
    David

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