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Thread: Concrete block shed for DC and compressor?

  1. #1
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    Concrete block shed for DC and compressor?

    I have quite a number of concrete blocks....enough to build the walls for a small shed to house my DC.
    Are there any reasons why this might not be a good idea?
    I'm thinking I'll pour a small slab and wet set the bottom row, then mortar the rest.
    Any ideas or suggestions ?
    Not only would this eliminate much of the sound while in the shop but it might make it easier to quiet it down for the neighbors.
    We had a cold spell this winter with -35. Can a DC handle such temps?
    Would moisture be a bigger problem?

  2. #2
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    My own post spawned an idea for cheap, effective sound deadening.
    Suppose I build this shed. And every other layer or so use the half wide blocks, set them so the large end of the holes is in, then perhaps fill the gap in them with aucustic foam blocks.
    Thus, venting through the wall, but using a much broader area to vent the sound.
    What do you think?

  3. #3
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    I meant to point out that I was referring to the long half blocks, not the short, square blocks.
    And, another bonus...no costly 8" duct.

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    Sorry, no help on your questions, but I would think wet setting the first course would actually be more work than laying them on mortar after you have a level footing under them. With the first course nice, and level, it's easy to go up. If it's not, it will be a fight for several courses. It's also much, much faster to set corner guides, even if you make them out of wood, than using a level to try to keep the corners straight.

    Don't know what "long half blocks" are. Do you mean 4" blocks?

  5. #5
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    If you are venting to the outside, you will have to return air from outside back into the shop. That return air will have to be heated of course during the winter.
    Cheers,

    Tim

  6. #6
    Concrete does deaden sound. Not sure you need styrofoam blocks, unless for insulation. When I set up my cyclone to exhaust outside, I made an 8" gate, so I can close that gate and use the filter. There is a T on the exhaust. Be sure to use big enough footing. Not sure about setting the first row of block in the concrete, probably better to set on a solid footing. I am no block layer, if you are, use your own judgment.

  7. #7
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    Yes, I meant the 4" blocks.

    Now I'm confused. When I first considered a concrete pad I had second thoughts about that, thinking the slab would created more noise, someone wrote it would deaden it instead.
    Are you certain it would not reduce noise.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Janssen View Post
    If you are venting to the outside, you will have to return air from outside back into the shop. That return air will have to be heated of course during the winter.
    Cheers,

    Tim
    Yes, but I'm convinced venting outside is the healthiest way to go.
    And i think the block house would reduce some of the pollutants for me and my neighbors.
    Last edited by Bill Jobe; 04-04-2019 at 10:49 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Jobe View Post
    I have quite a number of concrete blocks....enough to build the walls for a small shed to house my DC.
    Are there any reasons why this might not be a good idea?
    Nope
    I'm thinking I'll pour a small slab and wet set the bottom row, then mortar the rest.
    Any ideas or suggestions ?
    Sounds like a plan to me. You might consider lining the inside with foam board to further damping the noise, and set the DC on a section of Stall Mat..
    Not only would this eliminate much of the sound while in the shop but it might make it easier to quiet it down for the neighbors.
    We had a cold spell this winter with -35. Can a DC handle such temps?
    It would be the grease in the bearings that would be the limiting factor. -35 degrees F is pretty cold. My DC starts to complain in the teens.
    Would moisture be a bigger problem?
    Could be depending on how tight the enclosure is.
    Bill
    I am with you. Get the DC out of the shop. Whatever losses would be incurred by having to heat the shop, would surely be offset to a large degree by not incurring the cost of filtration in a closed system.
    There is no perfect solution. Concrete does transmit sound, but it will also significantly diminish the amount of noise. I think you have a good idea personally, and have been slowly moving in that direction myself.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

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    Another duct question:
    In my new DC, the intake has an 11 angle where the duct connects. I know you are supposed to have a 6' straight run just prior to entering the Cyclone.
    I found an 11 6" drain fitting. Does it go at the entry point of the cyclone or back prior to the 6' straight run?

  11. #11
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    This is the style of block I was referring to.
    On the ones I have on hand, the hollow openings are much smaller on one side. I was thinking of laying several rows of these to spread out the exhaust. Also, I think the rough larger opening to the inside might obsorb more sound than a straight opening.
    I also wonder if using cotton batting in the cavities if these blocks might capture fines and reduce pollutants for both me and my neighbors. The batting could easily be tossed out when dirty and replaced. Not very expensive either.
    That might even cut down on noise a bit.
    What think ye?
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    As for the exhaust port, I'M thinking of taking a 5 or 6 ft. Section of 8" drain pipe, capping the end and drilling a large number of half or 3/4" holes in the pipe to further reduce sound coming from the exhaust.
    Any thoughts?

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    I purchased a Clearvue 1800.

  14. #14
    Are you considering laying the 4" blocks flat? I made a outlet for the 8" pipe like a dryer vent, the flapper is a piece of 1/4" ply, and I bent a piece of thin flat metal for the outside to protect it from rain.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Andrew View Post
    Are you considering laying the 4" blocks flat? I made a outlet for the 8" pipe like a dryer vent, the flapper is a piece of 1/4" ply, and I bent a piece of thin flat metal for the outside to protect it from rain.
    Yes, flat. With the larger cavity to the inside. I thought they look like that cavity with the smaller opening out. Would reduce sound levels....like a muffler only the size of a shed.
    Make any sense?

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