Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18

Thread: 3d printer for organization?

  1. #1

    3d printer for organization?

    Dear Sawmill Creek,

    Do any of you use a 3d printer for organizing/building up a workshop?

    I just moved back to my old place on Saturday.
    After I get settled, I'm thinking of building up my long-neglected workshop.

    I might do another thread for ideas...

    -Matt

    ps. Here's some ideas that I was thinking about https://www.apartmenttherapy.com/mat...artment-229038

  2. #2
    Is that a plug for your blog? Where on LES? I live 4 hours north of you but still have my apartment off Hudson in W. Village. I find that the wife's Crickut (cricket??) printer machine is much better for labels/organization. It can do printable vinyl in different colors so run it through printer then she shops it into label strips in the cutter thing.

  3. #3
    No, not a plug for my (nonexistent) blog.

    I'm just thinking of 3d printing some holders for my Japanese chisels, gennou, saw, etc.
    I'm a pretty bad guitarmaker, but just can't quit.

    Just wondering if anyone has used a 3d printer for their workshop.

  4. #4
    FWIW, I'm thinking of getting a Prusa MK3 in the near future.

  5. #5
    No, I own a bandsaw, a 3D printer is just a device that prints disappointment in a variety of colors and sizes.

    All joking aside, I think it's good practice, and efficient use of scraps to just make holders from scraps.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,607
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Lau View Post
    I'm just thinking of 3d printing some holders for my Japanese chisels, gennou, saw, etc.
    I'm a pretty bad guitarmaker, but just can't quit.
    This was what I was missing for some reason in the original post. It's not a terrible idea if you are interested in it and want to add 3D printing to your arsenal. There obviously are many ways to create tool holding/storage solutions that leverage technology...I've been starting to use my CNC machine to create organizational things when I'm not cutting other projects, for example.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
    I'm surprised the cost isn't prohibitive?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Tippecanoe County, IN
    Posts
    443
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    I'm surprised the cost isn't prohibitive?
    Dan, midrange material cost for common filament types is about $20/kg. Further more, many parts are printed with a low density honeycomb type core. Material cost can actually be fairly reasonable.

    For example, an adapter I printed to connect a 4" jointer/planer dust port to a 6" hose fitting used 230g of filament, or about $5 worth. That's actually less than a roll of duct tape plus a tin HVAC adapter or a Fernco.

    The real cost is the time it takes to make the software model and then print the part. A quick trip to Menards and a bit of fooling around making things fit would have been much faster.

    To me, the main advantages to the printed approach are 1) I gained some valuable experience with both Fusion 360 and 3D printing, 2) The printed part is an exact fit for the J/P port and 6" S&D, and 3) IMO at least, it's a much cleaner and finished look (except for the hose clamp).

    JPAdapter2.jpg
    Beranek's Law:

    It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion.
    L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

  9. #9
    David, that's really cool! I especially like the latch.

    I'll have to look into this. I had considered 3D printing some DC fittings, too, but (at least when I last looked into it) thought the costs were too high to be reasonable.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Tippecanoe County, IN
    Posts
    443
    Thanks Dan. Funny you mentioned the latch. That's the one part I'm having problems with. It's designed to break away in case my feet tangle with the hose, and it does that. Turns out though that the material I used (PLA) is susceptible to creep and the spring tension is enough to pop it off after a few weeks.

    I originally bought the printer (ANET A-8) to make some cases for small electronic projects. Instead I've been having fun making DC fittings.
    Beranek's Law:

    It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion.
    L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley
    Posts
    80
    I came across this article the other night in which the author shared the files he made for some common workshop items---bandsaw plate inserts, dust collection fittings, Magswitch jig pieces, etc. I don't have a 3D printer, but my university does, and I'll try to dream up an educational purpose for using it to print out some of these.

    https://www.instructables.com/id/3D-...r-Woodworking/

  12. #12
    Yes! I have printed bit holders and such. Couple of corner guards and assorted little bits. Great for fixtures for a dial indicator. Made a nozzle that includes LED lights using a fan form a server. I have that mounted on my band saw. It blows the dust from the line and illuminates at the same time. Handy for little clips and things. I really enjoy having the printer in the shop. It does take a little time to build the models and printing is very slow. I just finished a bit holder for all the bits/drivers that I use the most. That was a worthwhile investment. It hangs on the wall above a bench with all of those bits well within reach. Nothing fancy and would be easy (perhaps easier?) to make in scrap wood, but the printer is there and now I have a base design I can modify and reprint as needed. Also made a dial indicator holder that mounts to my tenon jig so I could make tiny adjustments. That works great! Oh, just made some knobs for my drill press mobile base. So, maybe not so much organization as other stuff.

    Tony
    Last edited by Tony Leonard; 04-04-2019 at 4:53 PM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Sterling, Virginia
    Posts
    505
    I think there are some good ideas in this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8mzMDLqENA&t=447s

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Dawson Creek, BC
    Posts
    902
    3D printing is good for prototyping, and small items, but beyond that it is slooooowwwww. How many hours to print that fitting? Someone posted a similar one on another site and it took 8hours or more. We have a small printer we use from time to time, but it is basically a play toy.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Lau View Post
    No, not a plug for my (nonexistent) blog.

    I'm just thinking of 3d printing some holders for my Japanese chisels, gennou, saw, etc.
    I'm a pretty bad guitarmaker, but just can't quit.

    Just wondering if anyone has used a 3d printer for their workshop.
    How the heck do you have stuff like that in a nyc apartment?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •