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Thread: Oneida Silencers

  1. #1
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    Oneida Silencers

    Anyone using these? It's the type that bolt between the filter and the plenum. Thinking of adding it to my setup.

    I added a tables and added duct to my router table so I'm going to be running my collector a lot more often. I want to avoid annoying the people in my house anymore than I already do.

    I see some youtube videos showing 6-7 decibel's reduced.

    They also sell a drop in silencer which claims a much larger range (2-8Db), wondering if that can't also be added.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  2. #2
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    Some time back I read a lot about cyclone mufflers on the ClearVue and other sites. I put my entire cyclone in an insulate closet so I didn't try it may self, but from what I read insulating the exhaust is a great benefit.

    If you have room for a closet it can work well. I can hear a whisper outside the closet with the cyclone running. I built it with staggered stud walls to minimize transfer of sound. If your shop is in the house a combination of the muffler and a closet with insulation all around might make the family very happy!

    JKJ

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Anyone using these? It's the type that bolt between the filter and the plenum. Thinking of adding it to my setup.

    I added a tables and added duct to my router table so I'm going to be running my collector a lot more often. I want to avoid annoying the people in my house anymore than I already do.

    I see some youtube videos showing 6-7 decibel's reduced.

    They also sell a drop in silencer which claims a much larger range (2-8Db), wondering if that can't also be added.

  3. #3
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    Thanks John, appreciate your comment.

    Unfortunately the closet isn't possible in my current setup. I agree that is pretty much ideal, so I'm thinking the muffler(s) might be a good help.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  4. #4
    I installed one and didn't measure db, but it was noticeably and pleasantly quieter. The drop in style was part of original set up, so both in place now. I'd spend the money again, FWIW.

    Wish I could do similar with the screaming vacuum for CNC

  5. #5
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    I had an early version on my first Oneida cyclone and yes, it did reduce sound a little. In your particular setup, you might also consider hanging a blanket around the unit, particularly on the wall side to help reduce a little noise. That small garage is an echo chamber and adding some sound absorption/deflection can help a lot with machine noise.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    I have the grizzly version on my G0443. I cannot hear or measure a difference. For measurement I used a crappy cell phone app. I also don't think it matters than much, mine is relatively quiet at 78-82 dbs, while most of the tools make far more noise.

  7. #7
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    Thanks Gents! Much appreciated.

    Jim, that is a good idea, I think I'll hang a blanket on both sides to cut down on the deflection.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  8. #8
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    It made a noticeable difference in my cyclone installation.........Rod.

  9. #9
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    Glad to hear that, I bought one so I’m interested to see the effect first hand.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  10. #10
    am I in the wrong business. You woodworking people need to spend a little time over on the dark side. The world of race cars, burning fossil fuels, having things on your clothes or under your fingernails that cause fish-eyes or prevent paints/stains from adhering...

    I could sell you pretty much all of those at half of their retail list price (in stainless and tig welded). At those prices (markups) I could put 5 kids through private schools and Ivy colleges...


    https://www.oneida-air.com/ductwork/...haust-mufflers



    I just asked sawmillcreek for advice on improving a ---- HF DC that I bought used on CL with a Rikon impeller. Over the last week I built a scaled down version of Bill Pentz's cyclone. I have cars and have owned a race car so naturally I built and put a silencer/resonator (exactly like the brand OP mentioned) in my system. It cost me zero --I had it laying around in scrap. I've got a newborn and the old stock HF DC system would wake up the (then pregnant/not happy) wife every time it kicked on. I only have room for one angry female in my life... Daughter, wife, two female dogs.... I had to do something.

    My DC motor is mounted to a wall bracket I built with bmw transmission mounts between DC motor & housing and the bracket. And I put an inline (VERY EASY TO MAKE) silencer/resonator between the impeller exhaust and filter plenum. What I built is welded (gmaw) but you could easily drill and pop-rivet it with roofing caulk (density) or similar then wrap with lead/tar flashing.


    Here's an example:

    I own a small Coleman Powermate 5000W ER generator with a Techumseh 10hp 4stroke OHC motor. It comes with a spark arrestor on it --which means it's not even a muffler, it's just a contraption that prevents the engine from spitting out fire and burning stuff. (no sound considerations at all)

    They (Coleman, Tecumseh) sell a "muffler" for that motor. It's expensive, hard to find used, etc.

    Reality: You could spend a billion dollars on exhaust muffling but since most of the noise comes from the overhead cams/valves and the core of the motor --no amount of exhaust muffling is going to change the noise unless you put that thing in a soundproof box.


    You can fold tar paper in half and then wrap your DC pipes with it, then wrap tar flashing tape over that to keep it in place (density kills the sound). Then put your DC motor/impeller in a box with a couple layers of drywall (with ventilation) and Safe'nSound... and then worry about the filter/exhaust. Circles are circles, square inches are square inches. You could easily break out the flow of a DC exhaust pipe from 6" to 12" going through individually wrapped 2" I/O resonators then bundle them and wrap the bundle.... Feed that back down to what you need and I bet Autozone/O'Reilly could get you in & out for less than the brand name you listed (and you would be quieter).


    Gosh I'm in the wrong business... That's highway robbery...


    Go buy a race car and try to cheat. In many classes cheating means more noise. More power means more noise. So you work on resonators and silencers that keep quiet but don't inhibit air flow --so scumbags can cheat because they can't f'ing drive...


    There is millions of dollars being spent on exhaust silencing technology --all the way from airplanes (stealth bomber) to stupid NASCAR. For $600 I could build a part and possibly drive to you and install it. These companies are insane.
    Last edited by John K Jordan; 04-03-2019 at 4:54 PM. Reason: language

  11. #11
    How the cyclone is mounted is important as well. I have the factory wall mount bracket for 3 HP Dust Gorilla; it made mounting fast and simple. Unfortunately it also makes the entire wall the equivalent of a piano soundboard, transmitting the vibrations of the machine into the shop. I have a closet built around the machine filled with acoustical tile that pulls out most of the medium and high pitched frequencies, but the lower frequencies and rumble still come through the walls.

    On the list of things to do, is to build an insulated closet outside of the shop and build a freestanding stand to support the cyclone. That way I can duct the air back into the shop, but (hopefully) keep most of the noise outside. I have heard of people isolating the concrete that the cyclone stands on to reduce noise as well, not sure if I will go to that extent though. I'm hoping the freestanding support will make enough of a difference. Moving it outside the shop is really more to free up the space inside more than anything

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Singer View Post
    am I in the wrong business. You woodworking people need to spend a little time over on the dark side. The world of race cars, burning fossil fuels, having things on your clothes or under your fingernails that cause fish-eyes or prevent paints/stains from adhering...

    I could sell you pretty much all of those at half of their retail list price (in stainless and tig welded). At those prices (markups) I could put 5 kids through private schools and Ivy colleges...


    https://www.oneida-air.com/ductwork/...haust-mufflers
    Wow, that's pretty eye opening. The Grizzly version is like $50, which seems far more reasonable. I was going to make one, but my time's worth something. I suspect that you could easily install this same muffler on a Oneida cyclone and get similar results.

    https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...ollector/H8165
    Last edited by John K Jordan; 04-03-2019 at 4:54 PM.

  13. #13
    I don't know how much they help. We have a cyclone on our cnc and it has the foam pads inside the filters. I can't imagine they do a huge amount. I'm way too lazy to pull them out test it.

    I have wondered if coating the entire system, pipe and everything, in undercoating or bedliner material how much it would quiet things down.
    Wouldn't be cost effective, and the eventual alterations would be a pain in the rear. Just a curiosity.

  14. #14
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    The motor is not that noisy, it's mounted on a stand that isolates the DC from the ground so it doesn't vibrate anything. The noise is air. Wrapping an electric motor strikes me as being a way to greatly increase the amount of heat that builds up in the motor.

    Anywho, it's being delivered in a couple days, so I'll find out first hand.

    I didn't take $200 to be too outrageous considering what it would cost me to weld out it in stainless (I don't retain much in the way of scraps) and do the testing required to get a good result.

    Martin, that's my opposition to wrapping the duct as well, it's going to be hell to change anything and my shop does change from time to time.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Singer View Post
    am I in the wrong business. You woodworking people need to spend a little time over on the dark side. The world of race cars, burning fossil fuels, having things on your clothes or under your fingernails that cause fish-eyes or prevent paints/stains from adhering...

    I could sell you pretty much all of those at half of their retail list price (in stainless and tig welded). At those prices (markups) I could put 5 kids through private schools and Ivy colleges...


    https://www.oneida-air.com/ductwork/...haust-mufflers


    There is millions of dollars being spent on exhaust silencing technology --all the way from airplanes (stealth bomber) to stupid NASCAR. For $600 I could build a part and possibly drive to you and install it. These companies are insane.
    The dark side? How is racing the "dark side".

    Anyway, if you believe so strongly you could accomplish what you allude to, which is cut a fat hog in a fabrication business, more power to you. I'll be a customer. As will others here, I suspect.
    Last edited by John K Jordan; 04-03-2019 at 4:56 PM.

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