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Thread: Why get DW735 planer?

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, ON Canada
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    1,215
    My experience is quite different than Julie's. I run 12" boards through my 735 quite often and can take 1/16" off on each pass without tripping the breaker. I do hone the blades from time to time, especially with hard maple, but that's about it. The Hammer is a great machine, but at somewhere around $5000 in Canada, it's way out of my snack bracket.
    Grant
    Ottawa ON

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Evanston, IL
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    1,200
    Quote Originally Posted by Grant Wilkinson View Post
    @Steve: That was the only issue that I had from time to time, Steve. I would get chips out the front of the machine, particularly if I was planing something quite thick so that the head and rollers were inches from the bed. I don't get that now at all. Since I see no downside and since it's a lot quieter, I figure that it's a win. (It's still loud, though.)
    This is interesting. No chips out the front and quieter? How hard is it to remove the impeller? Is it permanent, or can it be put back if I ever decide to sell my 735?

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley
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    79
    This is interesting. No chips out the front and quieter? How hard is it to remove the impeller? Is it permanent, or can it be put back if I ever decide to sell my 735?
    Jon: It's pretty easy to do (I just had to do it to repair the fan housing--which I referenced above). Here's a very easy-to-follow video that explains it.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=dXW0R4zZHck

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Punta Gorda, FL
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    2,703
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Lent View Post
    Did you try replacing the dull blades when this happened, or just continue to push the planer to do the work with the dull blades? When I notice that my 735 can't do the job the first thing that I try is replacing the blades. Some exotic woods will dull blades very quickly.

    Charley
    The blades were practically new. If they were dull, it happened in only a few passes.
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  5. #65
    It's that ultra slow feed , quick death to the knives.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Evanston, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Reich View Post
    Jon: It's pretty easy to do (I just had to do it to repair the fan housing--which I referenced above). Here's a very easy-to-follow video that explains it.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=dXW0R4zZHck
    Thanks, Steve!

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    TX Hill Country
    Posts
    549
    Wasn't there some recall or tech bulletin from Dewalt concerning slower feed rates being related to the chain / gears problems. I talked to their service rep about it and they sent me parts to repair the problem? This maybe over 10 years or more. I remember waxing the table, cleaning the feed roller with alcohol and working the lift mechanism and problem disappeared. I may still have parts somewhere in one of many spare parts boxes.

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    I didn't see anyone answer the question about missing out not having something beefier. In short, yes. The Dewalt is a really good portable planer, but it is just that. Any decent stationary machine is going to deliver better performance with less effort and fuss. Milling larger boards is going to be problematic with any portable, even the best one.
    I think the biggest issue is that the lunchbox planers can't feed long, heavy boards well. I used to have the Makita 212NB. I was a GREAT little machine. Easy to carry and it gave a dead-flat finish. However, I came into a huge stash of 10' - 12' rough-cut lumber and wanted to skip plane it all so asto be able to judge the grain. There was no way to use the Makita without constantly pushing the boards through, and it was a real workout.

    I was going to "upgrade" to a 735 with a helical head, but everyone here (wisely) warned me against this, so I found a nice used Powermatic PM100 12". OMG, what a difference! It took me a looong time to get it set "just right," but once I did, the finish quality was equal to the Makita, and even less snipe. (The Makita doesn't typically snipe, but it will sometimes with short boards or lousy technique.) I don't know if modern "hobbyist" priced stationary planers can be quite as good, but they probably come pretty close, if adjusted just right.

    I am still using regular blades on the PM100, though I am now considering a shelix upgrade.
    ------------

    Two important thoughts about folks that aren't 100% thrilled with helical heads:

    1: They require more power?
    The only type you should ever use is TRUE shelix. That is, where the indivdiual heads are skewed relative to the feed direction. That minimizes initial cut area, and thus does not bog down the motor much. There are plenty of cheaper heads out there which are only straight-oriented Helix, and my guess is that THOSE are typically the cause of "I need more power" complaints.
    Certainly with a low-powered unit like the DW735, you'd want to be sure and get the real thing, from Shelix.

    2: Wavy finish?
    Why this doesn't get mentioned more is a mystery: While I have yet to personally own a Shelix head, I have read numerous accounts of folks that were getting wavy finishes, who fixed this problem by simply correctly torquing-down the heads. - As in actually buying a good torque wrench & then following the manufacturer's spec.
    I have a feeling most users are not doing this.

    Also, supposedly you can get fine dust under the heads and that can cause mis-alignment.
    Or something like that, it's been many years since I did the research......
    Last edited by Allan Speers; 04-13-2019 at 9:32 PM.

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Reich View Post
    Josh: Where does Dewalt make this recommendation? The manual explains that the machine comes with two dust ejection ports, one for connecting to a four-inch dust collector hose. So, where do they say that suction can cause damage?
    Sorry for the delayed response.


    In the operational steps, right after fig 8. Page 7 in my manual.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    395
    Drew,

    What did you end up doing concerning a planer? Given the variation of feedback, you may very well be confused about what to do. Regardless of my positive experiences with the Dewalt 735, I would opt for a larger helical head planer like a Jet, Powermatic, or other name brand if the cost wasn't so high and it would be easier to get down to my basement shop. Whether the 735 meets your needs really depends on what wood you want to plane and whether you are putting it to constant use or using it only when you begin a project (maybe doing a couple of larger projects a year). If your use is constant, I would, fore sure think about a floor standing planer in the 15" or 20" variety; a lot more money but, in the long run, probably worth it for heavy duty use. As for me, I most likely would buy a second 735 if my 10-year old 735 stopped working, possibly considering upgrading the head to Shelix after purchase. For my old 735, the cost is too high for a tool that is now over 10 years old.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    TX / LA border.. Toledo Bend
    Posts
    633
    Asking here about sanding effort /time after running through Dewalt on low speed w standard knives.

    I'm considering buying this... ? OR ? a great condition old Parks.

    I would only be running like 200 bf /month, mostly 1x6.

    Knotty Pine, Eastern Cedar, some Oak basic boards for my Caskets.

    Subjective I know but can you guys give me some idea on how nice the surface is after the machine ?

    I guess I'm concerned about any ripple and the labor time to correct it.

    My finish sanding is done w a Bosch 5" RO hand sander.

    Start and finish w 120 for my low line Sanded bare wood, and finish w 150 for my Stained/ Lacquered ones.

    Marc
    Last edited by Marc Jeske; 04-18-2019 at 4:05 PM.
    I'm pretty new here, not as as experienced as most. Please don't hesitate to correct me

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    6,129
    I kept my DW 734 box and put the planer on a wooden stand. I keep the planer in my Galveston County Texas workshop.
    I put the box on the planer when it is idle.
    No rust has appeared.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    395
    I have always been happy with the finish after the 735. Any ridges from nicks in the knives are usually easily removed although there can be an occasional larger ridge. Depends on how often you change knife edges and whether you ha e found an acceptable way to hone the 735 knives to get more than one cycle from a set.

    However, you are probably running more board feet through this planer than it meant to do. If your 200 board feet per month is going to be a consistent long-term need, I would recommend a heavier duty planer. I have never seen the 735 as anything but what it is; a great planer for the woodworking “hobbyist” or a woodworker who makes mostly small items- a Woodworker with a lower planer demand.

  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Jeske View Post
    Asking here about sanding effort /time after running through Dewalt on low speed w standard knives.

    I'm considering buying this... ? OR ? a great condition old Parks.....

    When I was researching quality, small planers, I found a lot of negatives concerning the Parks. Besides not giving a great surface, they have rather narrow heads, and most (maybe all) have babet bearings.

    I bought a used PM 100. LOVE it. The General 130 is also lovely, though hard to find.

    If you want a fairly inexpensive planer that can handle large boards & lots of BF, the Belsaw is theoretically not a bad choice. - But it will never give you the same finish as a Dewalt 735.

    And if you go portable, For even better finish consider the Makita 2012 NB.
    It only has 1 speed, but that's a LOVELY machine.
    Last edited by Allan Speers; Yesterday at 2:24 AM.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    TX / LA border.. Toledo Bend
    Posts
    633
    Looks like I may have to accept reality, though emotionally difficult.

    I am an Old Arn lover... but it seems in this case I may be better off w the Dewalt or makita new, rather than the Parks.

    I HATE buying chinese stuff, and own virtually none.

    Even though I would love a 30" capacity machine cause it would open up the world of quicker production glued up 16 - 28" ( in my case), that's not in the budget yet.

    So, I also use individual 1x6 for my low line units, and this sounds great for that.

    Marc
    Last edited by Marc Jeske; 04-20-2019 at 11:47 PM.
    I'm pretty new here, not as as experienced as most. Please don't hesitate to correct me

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