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Thread: The Hall of the Mountain King

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    240
    Beautiful shop Thomas. Love how you sited it with the split level giving you great access to both levels. What are your structural floor specs?

  2. #62
    The floor system is 12” Wood-I’s on 12” centers. A triple 12” glue lam spans the narrow dimension (26’) in the middle of the shop. The Wood-I’s run the long dimension of the room in two 18’ spans and are attached to the center beam with metal hangers. They added blocking between the Wood-I’s made of leftover Wood-I every four feet. I will have two layers of 3/4 plywood and oak flooring on top.

    I told the designer I wanted to allow for 75-100 lb per square foot live load to account for machines and lumber. I don’t know what they actually figured it would hold. Still, it seemed springy to the GC’s head carpenter so he added a column made of a double 2x6’s in the center of the basement temporarily. I am going to make the column a permanent feature. The timber frame company offered a 8x8 oak rafter beam that was miscut on our job to use for the column. I think I will do that. With the double 2x6 column in place, the floor system seems solid.

    I will look through my photos (or take some more) so you can see what it looks like. Floor systems have really changed.

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    The floor system is 12” Wood-I’s on 12” centers. A triple 12” glue lam spans the narrow dimension (26’) in the middle of the shop. The Wood-I’s run the long dimension of the room in two 18’ spans and are attached to the center beam with metal hangers. They added blocking between the Wood-I’s made of leftover Wood-I every four feet. I will have two layers of 3/4 plywood and oak flooring on top.

    I told the designer I wanted to allow for 75-100 lb per square foot live load to account for machines and lumber. I don’t know what they actually figured it would hold. Still, it seemed springy to the GC’s head carpenter so he added a column made of a double 2x6’s in the center of the basement temporarily. I am going to make the column a permanent feature. The timber frame company offered a 8x8 oak rafter beam that was miscut on our job to use for the column. I think I will do that. With the double 2x6 column in place, the floor system seems solid.

    I will look through my photos (or take some more) so you can see what it looks like. Floor systems have really changed.
    Corner view of floor system. You can see the blocking between the joists and the central GlueLam beam. The temporary 2x6 is right there. At least it is not buckling. There is a big load of framing lumber on the floor directly above when this picture was taken.
    CornerView.jpg
    Column and blocking under timber frame side post. A fourth of the roof system load and a fourth of floor system load are concentrated on this column. I asked them to beef it up in this spot. Looks solid.
    ColumnandBlocking.jpg
    The end walls hold less concentrated load because the floor system distributes the floor load along the wall.
    ColumnsUnderEndwallPosts.jpg
    Here is the finishing room. I plan to be able to use it as a spray booth. I use mostly oil finishes on furniture but I have an Apollo HVLP system that I have not used yet. I want to set the spray room up with filters and fans and such. haven't done any calculations on air flow and filter area but I will. There is a bathroom and laundry room plumbed in this space so it can be used by a future owner as a bedroom. There will be double doors entering the space for large pieces
    .FinishingRoomBdrm.jpg
    BasementBath.jpg

  4. #64

    Week 10

    The framing crew have put in a five full days since the timber frame went up. Most of the work to get the building dry is done. The estimate is that they will finish up the main roof with felt and build the screened porch up to floor joists on Monday. They will leave then before finishing the front porch and screened porch roof. They will be back in 1 1/2 weeks. The house should be mostly dry when they leave.

    I ordered 5/4 cypress tongue and groove flooring for the screened porch today. I have taken to calling the screened porch the “Horse Barn” because I expect that is where the shaving horse will live. I also ordered the high bay lights and barn lights. I suffered some sticker shock when I looked at Juno track lights. I will have to get something for the perimeter but I could not make make myself order them today.

    I am considering 8” in white oak flooring for the main shop with countersunk screws and plugs. I think it would be spectacular.

    Here are some shots of the progress as of today. The standard exterior

    4751E884-5BC0-4801-B679-3C9AF1128B24.jpg
    View toward the Green Wall.
    2971D73E-4050-492B-8F50-E29B389FD3E4.jpg
    Bird’s eye view of the shop
    6989D2A8-6E0F-4AD0-8FE0-931C155C70DC.jpg
    Rafters in the loft
    0AD4126F-81AA-412B-87F4-7386DEAE1607.jpg

  5. #65
    Wow. I am filled with envy. Well, and joy for you!

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,001
    That space is oh-so-wonderful! Count me as jealous!!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,702
    This is the equivalent of a Martin T75 restoration if someone else was doing it instead of me.

    I want this structure. It’s to bad I can’t afford it so....

    But man good for you.

    I second you purchase Marks T17. Add a Snowflake to the mix and man o man....

    All that ground level space has me lusting.

    Beautiful, just beautiful...

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    This is the equivalent of a Martin T75 restoration if someone else was doing it instead of me.


    ...
    I second you purchase Marks T17. Add a Snowflake to the mix and man o man..
    Hey Patrick,

    I looked at your restoration. That is some impressive work. It is actually moving along very fast considering all the other work you do.

    I looked at Mark Hennebury’s classified ad. That is some saw. I have a Unisaw with Unifence that has been a member of the family since 1988. It is more my speed. I used to have a sock stuffed with cash in my sock drawer where I was saving up for a SawStop. I might still go that route.

    is a Snowflake a big ol’ bandsaw?

    Thomas

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,001
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    is a Snowflake a big ol’ bandsaw?

    Yup...so-named because of what the (exposed) wheels look like...from back in the time when industrial machinery not only was major-beefy and functional, but also made to be pleasing to the eye.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,702
    Thanks very much it quite a compliment.

    I was saying anything just pointing it out if it was your speed. Or confirming that I agree with the poster about that suggested the same.

    One of the things I have going on right now is a property line dispute with a developer that just finished building a townhouse next to me.

    I’m done and it’s decided I’m moving next spring. Maybe just maybe someday if I play my cards right I can have a shop as perfect as what you are doing.


    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    Hey Patrick,

    I looked at your restoration. That is some impressive work. It is actually moving along very fast considering all the other work you do.

    I looked at Mark Hennebury’s classified ad. That is some saw. I have a Unisaw with Unifence that has been a member of the family since 1988. It is more my speed. I used to have a sock stuffed with cash in my sock drawer where I was saving up for a SawStop. I might still go that route.

    is a Snowflake a big ol’ bandsaw?

    Thomas

  11. #71
    I made a model to test the color scheme. What do yo think?
    6E905116-6775-4549-9477-59A886355237.jpgDAF245AE-568B-46A9-BF9E-0B5981F82A7C.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,702
    It’s ok but you can do better..

    Imop only..

  13. #73
    I would not break up that nice tall look. Either color , plus one trim color

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    3,870
    You asked for opinions, so I'm going to do like my Mama taught me.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    240
    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    I would not break up that nice tall look. Either color , plus one trim color
    +1. Your shop is gorgeous, the timber framing and outdoor setting seems to me to call for more natural, simple colors, without the cross trim piece. My preference is slightly darker trim than wall colors but clearly this is all like asking what flavor of ice cream is best. Choose what makes you happy.

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