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Thread: The Hall of the Mountain King

  1. #76
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    8,056
    I'm a fan of muted earth tones. One way to get ideas is to find photos on the internet of buildings in somewhat similar environments.

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    The specific color is up to you because it's very subjective. "My" personal preferences are similar to what John mentions. I like a structure to "integrate" with its surroundings so I would likely do a single shade for the structure with a mildly contrasting trim color. If I wanted to put a highlight on the gable end, I'd put something artistic up there centered while leaving the background the same as the lower level. But that's me...and as I noted, it's a subjective thing.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #78
    Thanks all for the comments. I made the model to test the colors because I was not sure if it was too much red. I wanted something bold but it is hard to tell from just paint samples. These colors are the ones suggested by the designer at the paint store. I asked for mossy green, brick red, and tan. This is what she suggested. I think her green choice is more gray than mossy. She said she did not want the color scheme to look too Christmasy. I like the bold russet red but it might be a little too much in real life. If you want to look up the colors, they are from Benjamin Moore and the main color is Gloucester Sage, accent color is Earthly Russet, and the trim color is Bleeker Beige.


    My model is also not a perfect model of the color balance because it does not show the stone veneer, garage door and people door below the main shop level. Also, the areas of main color, accent color and trim are not proportional in size to the actual building. If the basement doors were russet, that might shift the color scheme from bold to gaudy. The good news is that I am not buying paint anytime soon. I have time to experiment and maybe walk it back a little. One other thing, this gable end has the most area of the accent color. The front will just have the double front door with the russet The other gable end has a stone chimney cutting through the gable section to reduce the russet and no doors.

    An interesting side note, my sister-in-law is building a timber frame barn. I really like her artistic sense and she independently picked colors very similar to mine. She did not paint as much of her building red as I did in this model.

    Here is a JamesHardie design scheme from their gallery that I used for inspiration. I will have the same style of siding, shingles, and stone. I even plan to have the roof shingle ledger dividing the main level from the gable. I just want to change the main color from dark tan to mossy green to be more woodsy.
    IMG_5404.jpg
    Here is a color design illustration I put together with Benjamin Moore's color designer using my colors applied to one of their stock photos. It shows some ways I might reduce the amount of the accent color by dividing the areas differently. Note the garage doors in their design are red. It is bold but not overpowering.
    IMG_5405.jpg

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    3,758
    Must be some difference in the way it shows on my monitor. I'm not seeing a hint of green in any of that. One thing I always consider, when trying to decide on colors, is that it has to be something that I'm sure I'll never get tired of looking at.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    SE Michigan
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    1,997
    It didn’t quite work for me in your model, but I like how it looks in the second photo. I think that would look great in your wooded setting.

  6. #81

    Week 11 Closed in

    Not much happening this week. The carpentry crew worked one day. The OSB and paper are on the roof and OSB and Tyvek on the gable ends and porch wall. The carpentry crew have been working on my job continuously since May 28. They left to get back to a job they were working on before my timber frame arrived. Their goal was to get the timber frame protected from the weather. Now, I have to be patient.

    HVAC, plumber, and electrician are starting next week. I have ordered cypress T&G for the porch floor and the same spruce 2x6 T&G as the shop ceiling for the ceiling of the porch. For those who wish that the shop did not have walls in this setting, I am with you. There will be a screened porch.

    I am working on a modification floor plan to add a half bath in the loft. It is tight but doable. It will be 50"x60" tucked into corner of the gable end next to the knee wall. Minimum height for a bathroom under a sloped roof is 6'8 in front of each bathroom fixture. With the knee wall at 42" and a 12:12 pitch this will just meet. The tank of the commode will be against the 42" knee wall.

    I went to get an oak beam to from the timber framer to use for the support post in the center of the basement room under the shop.

    IMG_2035.jpg
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  7. #82
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
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    236
    Actually seems like a lot. Looking good Thomas.

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    I am working on a modification floor plan to add a half bath in the loft. It is tight but doable. It will be 50"x60" tucked into corner of the gable end next to the knee wall. Minimum height for a bathroom under a sloped roof is 6'8 in front of each bathroom fixture. With the knee wall at 42" and a 12:12 pitch this will just meet. The tank of the commode will be against the 42" knee wall.
    I want to get back out there in the next week or two for the roof and wall experience!

    Our timber frame house has a couple of bathrooms upstairs under the 12/12 pitch roof, like that (but larger). We just remodeled one with a glass-wall walk-in shower with a bench at the low end with the ceiling sloping up to over 10' on the high end. With a skylight in the sink/commode part of the room the sunlight can light up the shower at certain times. Quite pleasant. (There are 6 skylights in the roof.)

    When do you think your porch will be decked? I want to see that too.

    JKJ

  9. #84
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    48,863
    Adding that half-bath is a really good idea, both for your own convenience, but also for future use by "whomever".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #85
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I want to get back out there in the next week or two for the roof and wall experience!

    Our timber frame house has a couple of bathrooms upstairs under the 12/12 pitch roof, like that (but larger). We just remodeled one with a glass-wall walk-in shower with a bench at the low end with the ceiling sloping up to over 10' on the high end. With a skylight in the sink/commode part of the room the sunlight can light up the shower at certain times. Quite pleasant. (There are 6 skylights in the roof.)

    When do you think your porch will be decked? I want to see that too.

    JKJ
    I will be back at the lake on Monday. I have appointments in Oak Ridge Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. The carpentry crew will not be back until week after next. Their first goal will be to get the front and and screened porches under roof. With that done, the roofers can put the shingles on the whole thing. I would guess no more than three weeks. I am sure the whole place got pretty wet yesterday.

    They won’t put the flooring on the screened porch (or inside) until near the end, after major work is finished, to protect it. Until then they will put down some temporary plywood to be able to work on the exterior from the porch. Screens will be the very last thing.

  11. #86

    Tool layout in the Hall

    Progress has been slow for the last two weeks. All that was built was the rough in of the loft walls and bathroom and basement stairs. That happened when the carpetry crew were rained out at the other job they are working. We have had lots of days of rain since but also flooding. The crew's shop and a few of the crew's homes were flooded so we have to be patient.

    In the meantime, I made a Sketchup drawing of the shop layout. I was able to find models in the Sketchup 3D Warehouse that are close in appearance to my power tools. Here are the current shop tools that I have in storage that will find a new home in the Hall.

    Delta Unisaw with 52" Unifence
    Powermatic 15" planer
    Powermatic 6" jointer
    Delta 14" bandsaw
    Delta 18" drill press
    Incra Router table and fence using a Porter Cable 3 hp router
    Dewalt 12" Sliding Compound Miter saw
    Performax 16/32 drum sander (it is the original model and is significantly underpowered compared to the succeeding Performax 16/32 models and the Jet and Supermax versions of the sander.
    Craftsman lathe (the old singe tube model)
    Craftsman belt disk sander (I forgot to add it) it will live beside the Performax
    Craftsman 10" radial arm saw. This is the original saw I bought for myself in 1972 while I was still in college. It will be in the basement and used for breaking down boards

    I also have a Delta 16" scroll saw. It is currently in the Cave of the Modern Neanderthal in Atlanta. I will probably keep it there to make puzzles and toys with the grandkids
    And, I have a Delta 10" miter saw. This saw has been largely replaced by the more versatile Delta SCMS but it does what it does extremely well. It was dead accurate right out of the box in ~1980 and the cut remains perfectly square 40 years later. I can't say that of the Dewalt. It also weighs a ton. I probably should give it to someone who needs it but it is hard to part with an old friend.

    I also have an old Craftsman workbench from the 60's that was my father's and some tools and tool box that were my grandfather's. They are special and worth a post later when I can take photos. They will go in the corner by the front door.

    The long term wood storage will be in the basement. The shop will just have materials for the current project. I envision materials for the current project coming out of the back of my truck, onto a low cart, and into the front door. I will stack it on the floor in front of the Dewalt to break down as needed. It will go onto carts for surfacing and machining. I will spend most of my time in the space on the left of the floor plan.

    Here are screen shots of the floor plan and the 3D perspective of the tools.

    Screen Shot 2019-06-23 at 12.39.42 PM.jpg
    Screen Shot 2019-06-23 at 12.37.50 PM.jpg

    The white boxes are future shop furniture that I need to build. The 4'x8' rectangle on the floor indicates where I would set up saw horses for my track saw or assemble cabinets. Clamps will be hung on the wall behind the SCMS.

    One of the challenges of the new shop design is the lack of wall space for wall hanging tool cabinets. The windows and diagonal braces for the timber frame fill all the rectangular wall spaces. I have a hand tool cabinet and a drill press cabinet that have no wall space on which to hang. I also have some boards for hanging the accessories for the bandsaw, lathe, extension cords. I can work around the braces for these.

    The shop is a nice size but none too big. It is like the standard two-car garage (~24' x ~24') with the extra 10' that everyone thinks would make their garage a dream shop. The tools are all in the space but the passages between them are not the 3' I want for rolling a tool/parts cart.

    I have a couple of challenges in the basement. The garage door occupies the upper left corner of the floor plan. The basement ceiling is 9' which is just exactly what a 8' high garage door needs. Very little room for duct work for either the HVAC or dust collection. I will have to see it in real life to figure out how to run the duct. The floor joists run the long dimension of the shop with a heavy beam in the center of the floor running the short dimension.

    All the subs will be working this week. I think the carpentry crew starts Tuesday. The HVAC is starting tomorrow. Plumber and electrician are supposed to start this week but were vague about when.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Thomas Wilson; 06-23-2019 at 5:48 PM.

  12. #87
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    48,863
    Consider putting your jointer and planer near each other as they are very often complimentary in work flow...along with the table saw. Saves on drops and leaves more space open for flexible assembly operations.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Consider putting your jointer and planer near each other as they are very often complimentary in work flow...along with the table saw. Saves on drops and leaves more space open for flexible assembly operations.
    Thanks, Jim. Good input. I was mainly looking to have an arrangement that allowed the tablesaw, jointer and planer to feed in the long dimension in the room. My memories are strong of trying to make 14 ft moldings for build-in cabinets in a shop that was 27 ft. It involved moving planer, table saw, and jointer sequentially into alignment with the outside door, all avoiding a lally column in the middle of the room when moving them about.

    My arrangement of the tablesaw in the center between the jointer and planer probably comes from not so meaingful experience. When I began in the 70's, no home woodworking shop could afford a planer. I took rough lumber from the mill to a cabinet shop or a high school woodworking shop and got it planed to 13/16 with one good side and just lived with that thickness. Portable, affordable lunchbox planers changed all that. However, borne of that early experience, I still tend to just surface all my material on 2 sides alternating sides at the start of a project on the planer to get to thickness without using a jointer to flatten one face. In that process, the jointer and table saw work together ripping and jointing edges but the planer is not so much involved.

    In truth, a 6 inch jointer like my Powermatic is too narrow for face jointing most lumber. I will give some thought to other arrangements and work flow that allows the stock to be flattened before thicknessing. I might get flatter material for rails and stiles for cabinet doors and stuff like that.

    With Sketchup, the layout is fairly easy to change. After the holes are cut in the floor for the DC not so much.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #89
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    1,106
    Looking very good. Why the insulation on the DC duct?

  15. #90
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    Looking very good. Why the insulation on the DC duct?
    Frank, this is the land of heat and humidity in La Follette, Tennessee. That is the HVAC ductwork. I will have to work around and under the HVAC duct to get the dust collector plumbed up. I am still working on the design of the DC ductwork.

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