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Thread: From W. Germany by way of Colorado.

  1. #16
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    Aug 2013
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    John, here’s the slider for the table;





    And the sliding arm;

    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  2. #17
    Wow, congrats Brian. Looks very refined and adjustable!

    I'm headed down to West Orange in a little while....hope it's warming up down there.

    B
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

  3. #18
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    Dec 2010
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    WNY
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    Thanks for the added photos Brian. I never knew there was such a saw like that. That thing is built like a battleship, yet looks very high precision. I wonder who the mad hatter was who did the original design, which likely preceded CAD?

    It looks like the saw was never used. Absolutely pristine.

    John

  4. #19
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    Jan 2004
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    Lewiston, Idaho
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    Wowser! That is one impressive machine! I have never seen one or photographs of one before but even the photos scream "QUALITY"! Congratulations! May it serve you well!
    Ken

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Huntington, Vermont
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    Nice saw. An acquaintance of mine has one, the only other I have seen.

    I note the "Masterpiece Machines" sticker on yours. They were importing for a while back in the 80's. I seem to remember the business disappeared in a cloud of lost deposits.

    How easy is it to remove the crosscut fence for ripping?

  6. #21
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    Nov 2007
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    Goleta / Santa Barbara
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    719
    couldn't help noticing the washers on the bolts underneath the ULMIA label . . . . I am sure Patrick Walsh will notice those too - seems like someone was discussing those just a few days ago.

    Excellent find Brian.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
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    I had one a few years back. I bought it to sell not to keep. It was set up for miter work only, no ripfence of additional crosscut table. It seems that they were quite popular for picture framers. The sliding top is great for mitres and joinery. Ulmia made a lot of different models beside this one. Up to a panel saw size. I really don't have any experience with it, i only cleaned it, checked it over and played with it for a bit. then sold it. But it was a very nice saw.

    CIMG0333.JPGCIMG0314.JPGCIMG0324.JPGCIMG0323.JPG

  8. #23
    FWW profiled Kevin Rodel's Ulmia:

    https://www.finewoodworking.com/2017...iding-tablesaw

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    49,236
    Wow, the fact that the actual table top can slide is a pretty kewel feature.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Putney, Vermont
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    It is a shame that American saws do not come with some of the features, and the quality, of the Ulmia.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    Thanks for the added photos Brian. I never knew there was such a saw like that. That thing is built like a battleship, yet looks very high precision. I wonder who the mad hatter was who did the original design, which likely preceded CAD?

    It looks like the saw was never used. Absolutely pristine.

    John
    Thank you! German engineering during the pre-CNC period really amazes me, as I explore it I see things that I would have never conjured up to complete a task and yet it makes good sense when I see it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fitzgerald View Post
    Wowser! That is one impressive machine! I have never seen one or photographs of one before but even the photos scream "QUALITY"! Congratulations! May it serve you well!
    Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    Nice saw. An acquaintance of mine has one, the only other I have seen.

    I note the "Masterpiece Machines" sticker on yours. They were importing for a while back in the 80's. I seem to remember the business disappeared in a cloud of lost deposits.

    How easy is it to remove the crosscut fence for ripping?
    Really quick, turn the knob for the miter block and and the adjustable rod and remove the whole fence. I imagine that makes some of the masterpiece items pretty hard to find as most of those manufacturers seemed to write off the US shortly thereafter. I didn't quite understand why originally (aside from damage to their reputation) but now I see that so many of them used standard sized arbors and installed standard motors, so the manufacturers must have had significant investments in the deal. I think it's a little easier now with so many of the metric motors being available for 60hz and so many US consumers buying metric saw blades and other equipment.

    Interestingly, the saw came with another arbor (20mm) so I can use 5/8" saw plates or 20mm. I'm planning to buy groovers for it so that I can cut out kumiko in a much more painless fashion than I had been previously. I had a shoji job earlier in the quarter and decided to cut out another couple shoji for another project and was pulling my hair out trying to manufacture the kumiko....ultimately that lead to this and the Omga.

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick McCarthy View Post
    couldn't help noticing the washers on the bolts underneath the ULMIA label . . . . I am sure Patrick Walsh will notice those too - seems like someone was discussing those just a few days ago.

    Excellent find Brian.
    Thank you! I think those were added after the fact, and I'm debating wether to do that with all of the panels on the machine and also replace these with smaller diameter, thicker and black oxide coated washers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hennebury View Post
    I had one a few years back. I bought it to sell not to keep. It was set up for miter work only, no ripfence of additional crosscut table. It seems that they were quite popular for picture framers. The sliding top is great for mitres and joinery. Ulmia made a lot of different models beside this one. Up to a panel saw size. I really don't have any experience with it, i only cleaned it, checked it over and played with it for a bit. then sold it. But it was a very nice saw.

    CIMG0333.JPGCIMG0314.JPGCIMG0324.JPGCIMG0323.JPG
    Nice machine! I could see where these would be a really nice saw for picture framers. The utility seems to be that you can set the stops for the legs of the frame and trim to size, rather than to measure twice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike King View Post
    I saw that video, thanks for posting it up here too. He has an extension that I like for longer work and his has a mortiser.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
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    There are all kinds of used Ulmia table saw variants available in Germany: https://www.machineseeker.com/mss/ulmia+1710

    John

  13. #28
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    When this saw arrived, along with cane two blades from Leitz which are an 80T crosscut, a 25T combination blade, a Stehle 100T crosscut and a Freud with the wrong arbor size.

    Ends up, all of them are bested by a Tenryuu miter pro plus 60T in crosscutting.

    Wgich brings up a thought of what do you guys prefer for combination blades in a 10” size?
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  14. #29
    Everlast.

    Extra characters

  15. #30
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    Thank you!
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

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